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September 23, 1947 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1947,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

150-PoundGriddersStart
Practice for First Time

Fifty-eight miniature Hilkenes,
Fords, and Elliots reported to
Coach Cliff Keen yesterday after-
noon for the opening practice ses-
sion of Michigan's new 150-pound
football team.
AiLtiougn only a small percent-
age of the lightweights reported
any previous varsity experience in
high school or college, the new
mentor was confident of the ulti-
mate success of the experiment.
Right to Work
Keen, who is alsoshead wres-
tling coach, and his assistant,
George Allen, put the newcomers
through light calisthenics, basic
blocking drills and endurance
races during tis first session.
Four contests have been sched-
uled for the lightweights for the
coming pigskin season beginning
with a Saturday morning clash
with the University of Illinois 150
pounders on November 1 in the
Michigan stadium. On the fol-
lowing Friday the "little Wol-
verines" will play host to Ohio

State- and then willtravel with
the varsity squad to Madison,
Wisconsin where they will meet
the Badger lightweights on Nov.
14. The season finale will be
played at Columbus, Ohio on Nov.
22 while our varsity squad is en-
tertaining the Buckeyes here in
Ann Arbor.
Something New
Although Michigan has long
been prominent in intercollegiate
footballl it is the first time in its
All men interested in playing
150-pound foobtall should re-
port to Cliff Keen in Yost Field
House at 3 o'clock this after-
noon.
athletic history that it has fielded
a 150 pound team. The athletic
staff has long wanted to experi-
ment with lightweight football
but this is the first year that it
has gained the cooperation of
other Western Conference schools.

MAKES YOUR
BIKE A
MOTOR BIKE
Walking Whizzer
Time Time
Union to Golf Course........15 min. 3 mi".
Union to Stadium...........15 min. 3 min.

JUST KIBITZING
By PICK KR AUS
Daily Sports Efitr
As AP columnist Whitney Martin pointed out, the football sea-
on is already over and Notre Dame is the National champ. By the
ame token Michigan has already won the Big Nine Title, naturally
:cing unbeaten in the process.
But the rest of the Conference stubbornly insists on playing out
he schedule - just for kicks, of course. Iowa, Indiana, Illinois and
Northwestern go into the Conference mele strictly looking for second
)lace money.
The customary procedure from now on calls for Eddie Anderson,
Ray Elliot and Fritz Crisler's other Big Nine coaching breathren to
shake their collective heads sadly, mutter broken-heartedly, "I ain't
got a thing", and then point vigorously toward Ann Arbor and scream
"look at Fritz". And there's nothing Crisler can do about getting off
the hot seat, except point out weakly that his pint-sized 182 pound
offensive line is too small to deal with the big boys. He might venture
a word at the rest of the league's power, but since the pre-season
dopesters have already crowned Michigan, no-one would pay much
attention.
At Iowa, Anderson hung together a line last season that woke up
halfway through the Michigan game and nearly chased the Wol-
verines out of their own stadium. After trailing 14-0, at the half,
Iowa pushed over one score and very nearly tied things up. That
same line is back, anchored by All-Conference, Earl Banks at guard,
Bill Kay at one tackle, flanked by the Schoener twins at the ends.
The latter pair looked like the finest set of defensive ends Michigan
faced last season. In the backfield, Ron Headington should move
into Dick Hoerner's fullback post while Emlin Tunnel and Bob Smith
will handle the halves again. The quarterback spot has been bolster-
ed considerably. Last's year's green pilot, Lou King, has help now
from Bob Dimarco and Johnny Estes.
Indiana, and Illinois aren't exactly in the hapless class either,
The Hoosiers lost Ben Raimondi and Pete Pihos, but Bob Ravens-
berg, an All-American nominee at end two years ago is back,
and a complete new backfield named George Taliaferro is out of
the service rejoining Bo McMillen. Nick Sobek, a football pitch-
ing quarterback who flashed promise a few years back will fill
Raimondi's shoes. Guard Howard Brown and tackle John Golds-
berry are back to give the Hoosiers front line brilliance.
The Illini, even without Alex Agase,' Buddy Young, and Julie
Rykovich, are loaded. Perry Moss, Art Duffelmeir, Paul Patterson,
and Russ Steger, make up a talent loaded backfield and they are
backed up with plenty of reserves such as Chick Maggioli, a practice
session standout, and Dike Eddelman. The line is big and deep in
reserves and a scholastic convalescent named Lou Levanti has made
Champaign quit worrying about Mac Wenskunas' old center post.
And for a dark horse in the second place fight how about
Northwestern and a new coach, Bob Voights, formerly Paul
Brown's assistant with the Cleveland Browns. The Wildcats
probably lack good reserves in the line, a weakness they appear
to share with Indiana, but the first unit even without "Buckets"
Hirsch is big and tough, bulwarked by center Alex Sarkesian, who
rated rave notices in his first season of conference competition.
Captain Vince DeFrancesca at guard is another line standout, and
Jim Farrar, back from the service, should give the Wildcats a
fine passing T-formation quarterback to supplement a running
attack spearheaded by Frank Aschenbrenner, Ralph Everist, and
Art Murakowski.
This all makes for interesting speculation. It looks like it would
have been a very spectacular football season if Michigan hadn't
already been awarded the Big Nine title.
By the way, don't apply for your Rose Bowl tickets yet. The Con-
ference stubbornly insists on playing out the schedule-just for kicks
of course.

By BEV BUSSEY
Getting into the swing of the
'47 Grid season, class four-ites ex-
pressed their feelings on the new
method of football ticket distribu-
tion with mixed cheers and jeers,
comparable to last year's situa-
tion.
The loudest complaint heard
by your roving reporter rang
out from the ball and chain so-
ciety, the married students.
According to Mr. Murray Stod-
dird, in charge of distribution
at Waterman Gym, there were
twice as many married men
than anticipated which slowed
up the proceedings considerably.
That was no consolation, how-
ever, to Bob Gage, Phys. Ed.
senior, whose dogs were putting
up a stiff yowl sweating out the
line.
More than 75 per cent of the
first day business was dispatched'
in the initialthree hours, but the
tickets were staggered in order to I
give students who turn in stubs at
any time of the day a good chance
for good tickets. Those caught in
between, however, ended up in the
end (zone).
Jerry Lipnik, law student and

third man in the mass produc-
tion picture, grinned: "I was
ly waved a section 23 ducat. "Al-
ly waved a section 23 ducat. Al-
though distribution started late,
the lines moved along rapidly."
Irate Frances Culbertson, grad
student, glared: "It's absolutely
inefficient. After three hours I
wound up in the fifteen yard line,
simply because the signs weren't
placed properly. I waited in line
one hour before discovering that I
was in the wrong pew, so I had to
begin all over again."
Thad Joos and Herb Spencer,
Medical School sophs were very
disgruntled. Spencer believes
that after nine semesters he be-
longs in the press box, while
Joos a transfer student said
that we shouid follow his for-
mer brethren at Miami U.
where it was first come first
serve.
From the faculty viewpoint,
Thomas Geis, economics instruc-
tor, said. "Distribution was poor-
ly handled for married veterans.
We were given no choice in the
matter of seats in the sections
near the end zones."

ONE YEAR LATER:
Grid Ticket Distribution
Brings Mixed Emotions

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By The Associated Press
COLUMBUS, O.-Ohio State's
scouts believe Missouri will pose a
pretty problem for the Bucks in
Saturday's opener, but Wesleyf
Fesler had his eagle eyes on "Old
Mizzou" Saturday as the "show
me" boys waltzed over St. Louis
U. by 10 to 0.
EVANSTON, Ill. - Center Alex
Sarkisian and fullback Ralph Ec-
erist returned from the crippled
list today, but Coach Bob Voights
slowed up Northwestern's prep-
aration for Saturday's opener here
against Vanderbilt to avoid fur-
ther injuries.
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. - Four
reserves moved into the University
of Minnesota first string today as
head coach Bernie Bierman

stepped up preparations for next
Saturday's football opener with
Washington. The four are Mike
Bissel and Harry Hendrickson,
guards, Anonsen, quarterback, and
Bill Marcotte, end.
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