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September 23, 1947 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.' F THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TTJE STMT, S P!'MII ,

CONVENTION OUTCOME:
Results Seen by NSA Despite Conflicts

By TOM WALSH

EDITOR'S NOTE: Tbic is the fi'ct
in a series of interpretative articles
by a staff correspondent who was a
University delegate to the consti-
tutional convention of the National
Student Association and chairman
of the Michigan Region's delegation
during the convention.
Seven hundred delegates repre-
senting more than one million col-
lege students meeting at the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin early this
month, planned, discussed, dis-
agreed and compromised for eight
days, emerging in the end wiui an

astonishing degree of unanimity
and a constitution and program
"or the National Student Associ-
ation.
The constitutional convention
established a Student Bill of
Rights which will be presented to
all college campuses and admin-
istrations for adoption, applied for
one of the three student seats on
the United States Commission for
UNESCO, and set forth a broad
program of activities designed to
further educational standards,
foster the development of stuaenm

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governments, improve students'
living and studying conditions,
and better inform students on
national and world problems by
promoting student travel and ex-
panding of two-way international
student exchange.
Wide Representation
The full range of political, sec-
tarian, sectional, and racial
groups which were on hand at
Madison presented the convention
with many of the basic problems
which confront the nation as a
whole.
It was a favorable commentary
upon the future of our country
and a tribute to the sincerity with
which they approached those
problems, that delegates from 350
widely scattered campuses could
agree almost unanimously, in the
face of apparently insoluble con-
flicts, in order to form the NSA
as a, non-partisan organization
through which all students can
work for progress in America and
peace in the world.
Conflicts Arise
Twice the convention was in
immediate danger of breaking up,
once over the stand that the NSA
would take regarding racial dis-
crimination in education and,
again, in the international field,
over the relationship of the NSA
to the International Union of Stu-
dents which is admittedly politi-
cal and far to the left of the bulk
of American students. In these
crises, as in a. number of other
controversial measures, the fine
line of compromise at which vir-
tually all of the delegates could
agree to work together was found.
The convention was well at-
tended by the educational press
and by members of a number of
university administrations.
While the NSA is pledged to re-
frain from political activity ex-
cept in matters which directly
pertain to students, intra-mural
politics were very much in order
and in operation.
The extremes of both the right
and left were exceedingly active
but the NSA succeeded in follow-
ing a middle-of-the-road policy
representative of the bulk of
American students.
Tomorrow: The International
Union of Students

WINE - CHAMPAGNE - MIXERS
CONVENIENT DRIVE-THRU SERVICE

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Hig~h Output
Of Cars Still
Is Untcertain
Steel Production
Is Deciding Factor
DETROIT, Sept. 22 - (A) -
Prospects for continued high level
output in the car industry's as-
sembly plants are about as uncer-
tain today as they were six months
ago, with sheet steel the still un-
determined factor in schedule
planning.
The car makers will set their
schedules high for the remainder
of the year-and hope that they
will be able to fill them. It is no
secret that the supply of sheet
steel from the industry's regular
sources is inadequate for the as-
sembly plant needs.
The shortage of carburetors,
due to a strike in the Carter Car-
buretor Co. plants continues to
bother production processes, al-
though there is no indication that
immediate output curtailments
are planned in any of the car as-
sembly plants.
'Ensian Tryouts
A meeting for tryouts for
the 'Ensian business staff will
be held at 4:30 p.m. tomorrow
in the Student Publications
Building.
All eligible second semester
freshmen and upperclassmen
may apply for positions on the
staff.
Awards Made
In Hopwoods
Eight Receive Cash
For Creative Writing
Prizes totaling $475 were
awarded Aug. 14 to eight Univer-
sity students in the summer Avery
and Jule Hopwood Contest in Cre-
ative Writing.
Awards of $75 were given to
Arthur S. Postle, of Dexter, for
the essay "Admiral from Ala-
bama"; Maizie Gusakoff, of New
York City, for the fiction entry
"Dark Hour of Growth"; and
Everett W. Bovard, Jr., of Ann
Arbor, for "Poems 1940-1947."
Prizes of $50 were awarded
Vance Simonds, of Willow Run,
winner of a freshman prize in
poetry in 1943, for the play "All
This and Red Tape Too," and the
poem, "Logbook Returning";
James S. Irwin, of Detroit, for the
essay "Home-Going"; Gerald J.
Hoag, of Ann Arbor, for the es-
say "Frontier and New Frontier";
Joe H. Knox, of Newton, N. C.,
winner of a minor prize in fiction
in the spring semester, for the fic-
tion entry "The Curly Maple";
and Simonds, for the poem "Log-
book Returning."
Contest judges were as follows:
drama: Margaret A. Dewey, Rich-
ard McKelvey and Bethany L.
Wilson; essay: Richard C. Boys,
Deterhy Donfielly and Grace Pot-
ter; fiction: Rosamond Haas,
Richard McKelvey and Marianne
Meisel; poetry: John Arthos,
Rosamond Haas and Norman Nel-
son.

i

A HEARTY WELCOME
TO ALL MICHIGAN
STUDENTS NEW AND OLD
The Allenel Hotel
Invites You to Use its
Excellent Dining Facilities
DISTINCTIVELY DELICIOUS MEALS
Then P//eel o tel
126 East Huron Phone 4241

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512 E. William Call 2-0671
OPEN EVENINGS

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he. Michigan Daily
offers Practical Experience
to students in
Reporting
Organization and
Analysis of News
The Michigan Daily offers tryouts exceptional opportuni-
ties to gain practical training and experience in news-
writing, feature writing, headine writing, page make-up
and editorial work. All eligbile second-semester freshmen,
sophomores and upperclassmen interested in trying out
for The Daily editorial, womep's or sports staff should
attend a meeting to be held Thursday at 4:00 P.M. No

Freshmen!
Upperclassmen
New Students!
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RABIDEAU-
HARRIS

Wish to extend a cordial
welcome to Michigan's Old
and New Students and to
wish them sucecess in the
coming year.

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Former Michigan men have
learned the value of Rabi-
deau-Harris Clothes.

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previous experience necessary.

We invite the new men to
come down and become
acquainted, and learn why.

B. DM. 0. C.'s

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