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October 03, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-10-03

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THE 111CHfYAN 'IJAMtY

INFANTILE THEORY ADVANCED:
Syracuse Doctor Claims Cyanide Poisoning
FromUnripe Fruit Source of Poliomyelitis

SYRACUSE, N.Y., Oct. 2-(A)-
A Syracuse pediatrician, Dr. Ralph
R. Scobey, who firmly believes
cyanide poisoning causes infan-
tile paralysis, has put his finger
on unripe fruit, among other
things, as a source of the dread
disease.
Dr. Scobey's beliefs are publish-
ed in a series of articles in the
Archives of Pediatrics, a month-
ly publication of children's dis-
eases. He makes a double-barreled
claim:-
1. It never has been proved
tat the "virus" of poliomyeli-
05 can cause that disease in
human beings.
2. It has been proved that
polio can be caused by cyanide
poisoning.
His idea of how infantile para-
lysis is caused departs radically
from recognized polio research.
He says that cyanide not only can
SERVING HOURS:
11 A.M.-1:30 P.M. 5-7 P.M.
"Known for Good Food''
The TAVERN
CAFETERIA
338 Maynard Street

produce paralysis in human be-
ings and animals but that it re-
sults in a chemical imbalance in
the body that may have lasting
results. The functions of the thy-
roid gland and the liver are dis-
turbed, Dr. Scobey says.
He adds that polio is only one
of a group of diseases caused by
cyanide poisoning. In this group
he lists goiter and paralytic shell-
fish disease. He says it is possible
that rheumatic fever also results
from cyanide poisoning.
"I do not think," Dr. Scobey
says, "that a micro-organism ex-
ists that can be associated with
poliomyelitis as it affects hu-
man beings. The so-called virus
of poliomyelitis is doubtless a
by-product of the cyanide poi-
soning. This is probably a leu-
comaine or enzyme, which when
injected into experimental ani-
mals can produce or accelerate
the production of cyanide in the
body and thus produce a disease
similar to that resulting in hu-
mans from cyanide."
A major part of Dr. Scobey's
work has been tracing the sources
of cyanide that can affect humans.
He says it is present in varying
amounts in practically all foods.

It also is present in forage and in
polluted water. Some types of
bacteria can produce cyanide.
He says cabbage, cauliflower,
cereal and forage grasses, peach-
es, cherries, linseed, and even milk
contain cyanide. The source of
the cyanide in plants, he says, is
cyanogenic glucosides. These are
found in relatively large amounts
when plants are unripened. Also
he reports that cyanide content is
high during drouths.
There is little danger of polio,
he says, unless these cyanogenic
glucosides are acted upon by an
enzyme contained in the plant
or by an acid. However, he adds,
silver polish that contains cy-
anide may result in cyanide poi-
soning.
Organic matter, containing cy-
anogenic glucosides, carried into
streams and larger bodies of water,
breaks down into cyanide. This
vegetable matter furnishes food
for micro-organisms which like-
wise produce cyanide. Dr. Scobey
says the cyanide can be absorbed
through the skin and this possibly
explains why bathing beaches
have been suspected as sources of
infantile paralysis during epidem-
ics.
Dean Bennett Attends -
Regional Meeting Today
Wells I. Bennett, dean of the
College of Architecture and De-
sign, will attend the regional
meeting of the American Institute
of Architects today and tomorrow
at Dayton, Ohio.
Prof. Frederick C. O'Dell, of
the College of Architecture and
Design, will also attend the meet-
ing.

War Program
Will Be Cited
Here Monday
In recognition of the school's
services in the Navy war training
program, Rear Admiral J. Carey
Jones, commandant of the Ninth
Naval District, will present a
bronze plaque to the University in
ceremonies to be held here Mon-
day.
The award will be made on the
basis of the University's partici-
pation in the Naval Reserve Offi-
cers Unit, Navy V-12, Dental and
Medical programs.
Admiral Jones will be the guest
of theyUniversity at a luncheon
Monday noon in the Union.
Included in the luncheon group
will be: Prof. C. F. Kessler of the
mechanical engineering depart-
ment; Prof. M. H. Waterman of
business administration school;
Prof. Louis A. Baier, chairman of
the naval architecture and marine
engineering department; Captain
Homer B. Wheeler, of the naval
science and tactics department;
Lt. Col. Stephen Sabol, U.S. Mar-
ine Corps Executive officer to
Capt. Wheeler; and Col. Karl Hen-
ion, of the military science and
tactics department.

Home-Rolled
Fags Balance
WeakBudgets
(Continued from Page 1)

...
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Having a Dance
this weekend?

F

M

HAROLD WILSON-...
"BOY WONDER"-of British
Labor government, becomes the
president of England's Board of
Trade to succeed Sir Stafford
Cripps who was made Minister
of Economic Affairs. Wilson's
appointment was termed indica-
tive of decision to introduce new
blood into Labor regime.
Gaertner Will
Judge Exhibit
Carl F. Gaertner, painter, illus-
trator and etcher will judge the
local paintings to be exhibited by
the Ann Arbor Art Association
beginning Oct. 6.
Awards will be given for the
five paintings judged superior by
Mr. Gaertner. First prize will be
$75, the second prize $50, and $25
will be given as third prize. These
awards and the two smaller prizes
are private donations made to the
art association.

son says is that "you can get your
own custom-made cigarettes by
mixing different roll-your-own
brands."
"It's the biggest thing since the
five-cent cup of coffee," another
ardent enthusiast says.
Possibly the increase in pop-
ularity of the roll-your-own cig-
arette is what has prompted one
ready-made cigarette manufac-
tureer to send out a salesman,
equipped with technicolor film
and screen, to local drug stores
to present promotion shows and
hand out free samples.
Bill Later, '49Lit, is one man
the manufacturer needn't worry
about. Later scoffs at the whole
cigarette-rolling idea. He ,.declares,
"It's about as useful as a glass
eye in a keyhole, as practical as
raising chickens in an elevator,,
and more trouble than a $63 bill."
Read and Use
Daily Classifed Ads

You'll be needing some of the
new 'pop tunes.
SO FAR ........ ....Margaret Whiting
BODY AND SOUL Gordon McRea
LADY FROM 29 PALMS . . Pied Pipers
MINOR RIFF.....................Stan Kenton
TOO LATE ............. . ........ Tex Beneke
NEAR YOU .......Elliot Lawrence
MY FUTURE JUST PASSED........Harry James
STAN LEY STEAMER...............Dinah Shore
HURRY ON DOWN ... .... Nellie Lutcher
TOO MARVELOUS FOR WORDS Harry James
SENTIMENTAL RHAPSODY ........Les Brown
YOU DO ... ..................Vic Damone

And there are many many more at the

I

Rad1o

&

kecordShop
PHONE 2-0542

715 N. UNIVERSITY

L
f"

to

-

ART CINEMA and AVC return
by Popular Demand
" N ew p e ak! S up er b act i n g!"- L IFE
FRENCH DIALOGUE
Box Office Opens 2 P.M., Thursday, Oct. 2
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, OCT. 3, 4 - 8:30 P.M.
Tickets, Phone 4121, Ext. 479
HILL AUDITORIUM
PLAN NOW TO TRY OUR. DELICIOUS
CHICKEN CURRY this Sunday
IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWN

CONCERTS
UI it ue rJi/ tIc c / Soc

1,

+ Classified Advertising

+

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WANTED
WANTED-Young man with some sales
ability who is interested to do work
after classes. Work will consist of
calling on restaurants, sororities, and
fraternities selling china, glass, sil-
ver, kitchen utensils and equipment.
For full particulars write the Great
Lakes Hotel Supply Company, 1961
Grand River, Detroit 26, Michigan.
) 25
WANTED single garage space to rent
.-preferably Liberty Street area. Call
Mr. Howland, 20720 and leave num-
ber. )44
DO YOU HAVE A BABY BED for sale?
I need one? Phone 2-6845. Mrs. L. M.
Boulse. )33
FOR SALE
TUX, single-breasted, size 37, $20, fine
condition, call Herb 5372, 1003 E. Uni-
versity. )57
ONE UNDERWOOD portable typewriter,
13 years old, still usable, $13.00. One
Smith Corona, 1938 model recently
overhauled, good condition, $40.00.
Phone 6118 noon or. evenings. )7
1937 WILLYS sedan. Carries its age
well. Mechanically sound. Best offer
takes it. John Boenke, Dorm 19,
Room 97 West Lodge. Phone 9255 eve-
nings. )17
WHIZZER MOTOR BIKE. Perfect con-
dition. Completely equipped. 609 W.
Madison. Call 2-2331. )23
COLLAPSIBLE BABY CARRIAGE. Prac-
tically new. $23. Call 8842. Address
115% W. Huron. )44
'PORTABLE RADIO second hand Zen-
ith 6-tube. Call 9280 after 5 p.m. Ask
for resident Apt. 71. )56
FOR SALE: 3 white suits, a combina-
tion tux, one pair riding breeches.
Phone 8000. ) 55
BIKE: New tires, new paint, basket,
lock, chain guard. $20. Phone 8030.
544 S. First. )54
ANN ARBOR'S HILLS are a cinch with
three-speed English bike. Speedy, de-
pendable transportation. Recently
overhauled. Phone 6582 on Saturday.
Bob Shugart, 431 Fountain St. )42
NEW, light-weight, 6x30 binoculars, ex-
cellent for football games. Universal
Geneva Chronograph. 300 Tyler House
phone 2-4591. )52
FEW CHOICE CHORAL UNION PAT-
RON'S SEATS, phone 2-5152. )36
RADIO PORTABLE, slightly used. Call
Lawrence Niblett between 12 and 1
or 6 and 7, 1014 Church. )43
"CONN" tenor saxophone. Gold lac-
quer. "Conn Steelay" mouthpiece.
Standard case. Excellent condition.
Phone 6326. )50
'35 HARLEY "74" S.V. A-1 shape. $295.
Call 26824. As1 for Hopps. )47
FORD-1939 convertible coube, me-
chanically sound, radio, heater, good
tires, economical. Ladd, 1231 Olivia.
)46
FOR SALE-Girl's Schwinn bike, 1 pr.
ice skates, Roller skates, riding boots.
All size 5. 2 garment bags. Phone
4973, evenings. )2
1931 BUICK-Good running condition,
$200. After 7 p.m. Phone 4583, Ad-
dress. 326 E. Liberty. )40
SINGLE-BREASTED Kuppenheimer tux
-size 36-37; white Palm Beach suit,
size 36-37. Call Jim 7098. )26
MID-NITE BLUE formal, tails. Size 38-
40. Worn three times. Complete with
shirt and white vest. Very reason-
ably priced. Dr. W. S. Clifford. Phone
2-1487. )10

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Elgin wrist watch with gold ex-
pansion bracelet. If found leave at
main desk of East Quadrangle or
contact Harold A. Singer. 24591. )34
LOST: Parker 51 pencil with name
"Jean Rae." Please phone at 24471,
Room 3504. Reward. )13
LADIES BULOVA watch with sweep
second-hand and brown cord band.
Lost near stadium on Saturday at
game. Reward. Phone 8776. )49
GOLD football pendant lost. Sentimen-
tal value. Deward. Phone 20720. Hank
Klauke. )51
LOST: Lady's black and gold fountain
pen. Sentimental value. Reward. Call
2-3797. )45
LADIES WRIST WATCH. Girard Perre-
gaux, somewhere near Stadium. Re-
ward. Write, Berna Hicks, 1328 Oak-
ham Court, Willow Run, Ypsilanti,
Michigan. )30
LOST: Student football ticket, section
25, Row 72, seat 26. Reward. Call El-
ton Price, Ypsilanti, 9216. )19
ALPHA XI DELTA sorority pin, vicin-
ity Rackham around Sept. 17. Pleasea
call Mary Ann Harris, 2-5570. )6
TOPCOAT lost at State game Satur-
day. Hurd's lable. Write W. D. Weav-
er, 104 S. Logan St., Lansing. )14
SAD SACK lost season football ticket,
Section 30, Row 33, Seat 4, reward.
Phone 8221. )33
MISCELLANEOUS
IF THE GAME you want to see leave
your little child with me. Mrs. Aut-
en, R.N., Call 2-3697 after 5 or Sat.
a.m. )8
DRIVING TO CALIFORNIA next week.
Would like passenger to share ex-
penses. Call 4315. )12
HELP WANTED
SODA BAR
FULL OR PART T=~f
Days only. Apply in person. Witham's
Drug. Corner of Forest and South
University. ) 20
ATTENTION-Former telephone opera-
tors, we have a limited number of
part time jobs to offer. Apply Michi-
gan Bell Telephone Co., 323 E. Wash-
ington St. )22
FOR RENT
DOUBLE ROOM availabl for two male
students, 2 blocks from campus. 726
Packard. )
MALE STUDENTS interested in rooms
on campus be at 538 N. Division Sat.
10-12 a.m. )48
ROOMS for football weekend guests in
private homes. Phone Student Room
Bureau. 22239, 6-8 p.m. )18
BUSINESS SERVICES
BY ESTABLISHED tradition we do all
types of sewing, alterations, formal
restyling.Hildegarde Sewing Shop.
116 E. Huron. Phone 24669. )29
HOOVER SPECIALIST, SERVICE and
sales. Buy through Goodyear store.
For service call A. A. 2-0298. W. O.
Taylor, 1612 Brooklyn, Ann Arbor.)32
PHOTOSTATIC COPYING, discharges,
birth certificates, drawings enlarged
or reduced. Leave your work at Wikel
Drug Co. )21
MOVING? Rent big trailers for a dol-
lar at East Ann Arbor Trailer Co.
3304 Platt Rd., 25-9931. )5
RADIOS REPAIRED. Careful work
reasonable prices. Open evenings for

KARIN BRANZELL, Contralto.......October

8

CHANDAN'S

COTTAG E UN
512 E. William - One block from State St.
CHEF'S LUNCHEON SPECIALS
Meat Loaf, soup, scalloped potatoes, green
peas, coffee and dessert ............75c
Liver and Bacon, soup, mashed potatoes,
green beans, coffee and dessert ......90c
Pork Chop, soup, mashed potatoes, green
peas, coffee and dessert ............90c
Deliciously different Indian foods served every evening
in addition to tasty, home-cooked American meals.

Hours 1 1:30 to 1:30, 5:00 to 8:00

Closed Mondays

PATRICE MUNSEL, Soprano ........October 18
CHICAGO SYMPHONY .... October 26-7 P.M.
Artur Rodzinski, Conductor
DANIEL ERICOURT, Pianist . .... November 4
CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA . . November 9-7 P.M.
George Szell, Conductor
SET SVANHOLM, Tenor ...........November 14
WESTMINSTER CHOIR ..........November 24
John Finley Williamson, Conductor
DON COSSACK CHORUS .........December 2
Serge Jaroff, Conductor
BOSTON SYMPHONY . .........December 8
Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor
MYRA HESS, Pianist ..............January 10
MINNEAPOLIS SYMPHONY. February 15-7 P.M.
Dimitri Mitropoulos, Condutor
DETROIT SYMPHONY........ .. February 23
Karl Krueger, Conductor
GEORGES ENESCO, Violinist.........March Z
ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY, Pianist.. Marci 10
CINCINNATI SYMPHONY . ...... .. March 18
Thor Johnson, Conductor

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COMING!!

IN PERSON!!

FRED WARING

AND HIS
PENNSYLVANIANS

I1

sponsored by the
University of Michigan Men's Glee Club
at Dill Auditorium
October 31 and November 1, 1947 8:30 P.M.
(Use this convenient form for ordering concert tickets)
University of Michigan
Men's GleeClub
Michigan Union
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Enclosed find check or money order for $..............
for tickets to the Fred Waring concert-number, performance
and section as indicated below.
Friday, Oct. 31, 8:30 P.M. Saturday, Nov. 1, 8:30 P.M.

Main Floor ($2.40).......
1st Balcony ($1.80).......

Main Floor ($2.40).......
1st Balcony ($1.80).......

ON E DAY ON LY k

2nd Balcony ($1.50) ........ 2nd Balcony ($1.50).......
(Prices are tax-included)
MAIL TICKETS TO-
Name .........................................................
Address.......................................................
City...........................................................
(If the choice of tickets as indicated is not available when
this order is received, the order will be returned to the sender
promptly to allow for re-submission.)
(ENCLOSE A SELF-ADDRESSED, STAMPED ENVELOPE!)

TICKETS for most of the Individual Concerts
are available, at $3.00 - $2.40 - $1.80 - $1.50
(incl. tax) at Offices of the University Musical
Society, Charles A. Sink, President, Burton
Memorial Tower.

Wed., Oct. 15
MAIL ORDERS NOW
For Best Choice of Seats

1I.

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2 PERFORMANCES
Matinee 3:15 Evening 8:00

T7e THEATRE GUILD presentn
LAU RENCE
OLIVI!$R
SWiliam S/akespfare's
ENRY V"

nUSSIA IN THE NEWS
1947-48 LECTURE COURS
Presents Leading Authorities on the Vital Russian
Question and Russia Today - In Pictures f
Oct. 23-Walter DURANTY and H. R. KNICKERBOCKER ..
Debate-"Can Russia Be Part of One World"

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