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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 01, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN D OAILY E

POSSIBLE EPIDEMIC:
Students Advised To Build
Up Resistance Against Colds

By JIM MARCHEWKA
Sufficient rest and the avoid-
ance of overheated rooms during
sudden chilly spells will insure re-
istance against a cold, Dr. War-
zen E, Forsythe, Director of the
health Service, advised yesterday
in the face of a possible cold epi-
demic on the campus.
-4 "If possible, duck out of the
"'verheated room and keep well
Llothed while outdoors," he ad-
'vised. "Irregularities in the tem-
erature will contribute to the
"dangers of a cold. The outdoor
type of person seldom catches
.cold in spite of freezing tempera-
" tures," he added.
For fortification against fa-
tige,it is highly recommended
Sthat students remain on the cam-
pus over the weekend as often as
t possible. The extra rest that is
gained in this healthmeasure is
essential in preparing for the bur-
dening school week, Dr. Forsythe
explained.
It is difficult to avoid
crowde buildings in view of the
STechcni' Asks
For Writers
Six student writers and a car-
toonist, preferably with engineer-
r ing or technical backgrounds, are
needed immediately for work on
the features staff of the Michigan
7 Technic, the monthly student
publication of the Engineering
College.
f The work will include original
technical writing and cartooning,
:evaluation and selection of mate-
rial from other sources for use in
the magazine, and interviews with
outstanding faculty members and
students.
f Interested students are asked by
the staff to contact Ken Allison at
8747 or at the Michigan Technic
office, 205 West Engineering
Building.
SERVING HOURS:
0 11 A.M.-1:30 P.M. 5-7 P.M.
M' "Known for Good Food"'
The TAVERN
CAFETERIA
338 Maynard Street
"It's the TalI of thi
for your week-end
TOM McNALL'
feah
Vocals by JA
Audition This week-end:
Records Friday Nigh
A Available After the
Sat. Ni
CJIAN
512 East W

congested dining rooms and res-
taurants on the campus but stu-
dents should sacrifice a few mov-
ies to evade infection, he stressed.
Football games were excused
because of the reduced menace
of germ spreading in the open
air.
Explaining that influenza shots
produced little results last year,
the health service director an-
nounced that the shots may be
discontinued this year. If another
experiment is made this year, in-
fluenza shots will be given either
late in November or early in De-
cember, Dr. Forsythe said.
'Marshall Plan'
Seen as Topic
For own Hall
Tentative arrangements f o r
campus forums on the Marshall
plan and the current inflation
were made yesterday at the first
fall semester meeting of Town
Hall by delegates from six spon-
soring groups.
The organizations represented
were the Interguild, the Union,
the AVC, the ADA, the Newman
Club and the League Council. An-
other meeting scheduled for next
week to map out further plans is
expected to be attended by repre-
sentatives of most of the organiza-
tions on campus.
The Town Hall which came into
being two years ago, was founded
by the Student Religious Associa-
tion and The Daily. It has sought
to offer all campus groups an op-
portunity to discuss pertinent is-
sues on a campus-wide basis, and
to sponsor prominent speakers.
Grad Writes Book
"The Merry Innocents," a novel
about a professor and his family,
by Nolan Milller, who won a Hop-
wood fiction award in 1943, will
be released for sale by Harper and
Brothers today
Miller, author of "Moth of
Time," which was published last
year, is now teaching at Antioch
College, Yellow Springs, Ohio.
Town"
parties
S ORCHIESTRA
wring ...
CKIE WARD
Booked
t-OPEN ONLY thru
Game-Phi Psi Phone 2-3021
ght-Theta Xi

'Ensian Seeks
Villagers for
New Section
Willow Run Review
Featured in '48 Issue
The 1948 Michiganensian will
feature a new section, "Willow
Village, America's Most Unusual
College Campus,"-that is, if stu-
dents in the Village will tryout for
the 'Ensian staff and help on the
project.
"At present, we just don't have
enough village students to do the
job," Buck Dawson, 'Ensian man-
aging editor, pointed out. "WeI
need more writers, photograpners
and salesmen."
Nothing has ever been done in
the University, to give the village,
adequate representation in the
yearbook, according to Dawson.
The section will cover social and
extra-curricular activities of both
the married and unmarried resi-
dents, Dawson said.
"Report to the 'Eensian office in
the Student Publications Building
any time in the afternoon, we need
you," Dawson pleaded.
Last Chance
For 'Ensian Pix
The remaining 5 per cent of the
Senior class will have a last
chance to make appointments for
pictures in the 1948 Michigan-
ensian, according to Buck Dawson,
'Ensian managing editor.
"The 'Ensian business office on
the second floor of the Student
Publication Building will be open
from 2 to 5 p.m. today, tomorrow
and Friday to make appointments.
We want all seniors to sign up
so that the yearbook will be a
complete record of the 1947-48
year at the University," Dawsonj
commented.

Campus
Highlights
British Statesman . ..
Henry Usborne, British Labour
MP will deliver an address on
"The International Crisis," tomor-
row, at 8 p.m. in the Rackham
Building. The speech is spon-
sored by the Michigan Chapter of
the United World Federalists.
A * -
Student Legislature ...
Committee reorganization will
be the prime consideration of
the Student Legislature in its
first meeting of the semester at
7:30 p.m. today in the Grand
Rapids Room of the League.
* + +
Spanish Club ....
"La Sociedad Hispanica," the
Spanish Club, will hold its first
meeting of the fall semester at 8
p.m., today in the Michigan Un-
ion.
* * *
A VC Meeting .. .
A survey of Jim Crowism in
the Willow Run school system
will be made by George Mutnick
of the Village AVC at the cam-
pus chapter's meeting to be held
at 7:30 p.m. today in the Union
Nominations for fall semester
officers of the campus chapter
are also on the agenda.
* **
Eta Kappa Nu..
The campus chapter of Eta
Kappa Nu. the national electrical
engineering honor society, will
hold its first meeting of the semes-
ter at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in Rm.
247 West Engineering Building.
Chess Club .. .
The Student Chess Club will
meet at 7:30 p.m. today in Room
308 of the Union. All students are
welcome to attend.

Regents Meet
Here for 3-Day
Conference
National Body Probes
Education, Athletics
About 120 regents and trustees
of state colleges and universities
throughout the nation will gather
at the University tomorrow forthe
opening session of a three-day
meeting of the Association of Gov-
erning Boards of State Universi-
ties and Allied Institutions.
Principal features of the pro-
gram will be the presentation of
a report on a national study of
higher education by the Very Rev.
Charles E. McAllister, of Spokane,
Wash., a discussion of intercolle-
giate ahtletics by three officers
of the Western Conference; and
an address by William T. Gossett,
vice-president and general coun-
sel of the Ford Motor Company.
Regent Alfred B. Connable, Jr.,
of Kalamazoo, is acting as host
for the meeting.
First session of the group will
be held at 9:30 Thursday morning
in the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Regent Connable and President
Alexander G. Ruthven will ex-
tend the greetings of the Univer-
sity to the conference delegates,
and Phillip F. Whitmore, trustee
of the University of Massachu-
setts, will respond on behalf of the
Association.
U' Doctor To
Be Honored
Marking the 20th anniversary
of Dr. Cyrus C. Sturgis' chairman-
ship of the internal medicine de-
partment of University Hospital,
will be a banquet'to be given in his
honor at 6 p.m. today in the Al-
lenel Hotel.
Some 100 medical doctors who
have served under Dr. Sturgis in
the department through the years,
have come from all over the coun-
try to attend the banquet. Toast-
master for the occasion will be
Dean Albert C. Furstenberg of the
Medical School.
Dr. Sturgis, also director of the
Simpson Memorial Institute, came
to University Hospital in 1927,
after teaching at Harvard Medi-
cal School. He earned his bache-
lor's degree at the University of
Washington, and his doctorate at
the Johns Hopkins University
Medical School.
Continuous from 1 P.M.

By J. M. ROBERTS, JR.
AP Foreign Affairs Analyst
Whether it is a formal policy or
not, representatives of the United
States government and diplomatic
corps have started making regular
replies to Russia's propaganda and
name calling. There is a strong
question whether, in doing so, they
are not inadvertently playing the,
Russian game.
One of the chief weapons of to-
talitarian regimes always has been
the cloak of disturbance by which
attention is directed to the trivial
and away from the material. The
Communist always accuses his en-
emy of what he is doing himself,
in the hope that the noise of con-
sequent recriminations will drown
out the real blows he is striking
for revolution.
U. S. Justified
Because the Russian press is
strictly controlled, so that its ex-I
pressions are accepted as being
approved by the government, the
United States feels justified in
asking for an accounting when a
Russian writer compares Truman
with Hitler. And Molotov is given
a perfect situation in which to
plant the propaganda that his
government is not responsible for,
everything an individual may say
or write, and to claim that the sit-
uation is just the same as in
America. His reply is much the
same as the one he would have
received from the U. S. in similar
circumstances.One can almost
see the supercilious grin with
which he answered.
At the same time the State De-
partment is reported preparing to
put the clamps on all visiting writ-
ers for Communist organs abroad.
Under the program being consid-
ered, they are to receive about the
same, treatment as do American
correspondents in Russia. Tit for
tat, etc. Yet United States au-
thorities have-put the bee on Rus-
sian and other foreign officials

more than once in behalf of free-
dom of movement and expression
for some Americans who were only
very thinly disguised as report-
ers.
No Serious Damage
If the United States has a sys-
tem worth selling the world-as
we believe and are making strenu-
ous attempts to prove-it will not
be seriously damaged by a few ly-
ing writers. Instead, if the system
really is worth exporting, these
men will not fail to be impressed
by it. Their reports, for the bene-
fit of their masters, may not be
appreciably changed, but their
convictions and their belief in
what they have been told are
bound to be weakened.
That is less important than
whether the State Department,
having hitherto joined in the gen-
eral opinion that free communi-
cation between peoples is a prere-
quisite to peace, will now under-
cut that whole principle. Whether
taken in retaliation or defense,
measures of this type create a
chain reaction.
Russian secretiveness is fre-
quently cited by American ob-
servers as evidence that her system
will not stand the light or day, or

that her people would revolt if
subjected to the full play of
knowledge of the world, or that
she is hiding war preparations.
That is the impression always giv-
en by barriers to a free press, do-
mestic or foreign.
The United States, standing
however sternly and uncompro-
misingly against the spread of to-
talitarian communism, is one
thing. Engaging in small-time re-
criminations and retaliations, tak-
ing chances with press freedom
and crying "you're another," is
quite something else.
Bennett To Attend
Meeting atDayton

'YOU'RE ANOTHER' ATTITUDE:
U.S. Seen Playinig Into Russian Hands

- .-J

Prof. Wells I. Bennett, Dean of
the College of Architecture, will
attend the regional meeting of the
American Institute of Architects,
to be held in Dayton Friday and
Saturday.
Dean Bennett, will be a repre-
sentative of the Detroit Chapter of
AIA, of which he is the president.
He will be accompanied to the
meeting by Prof. F. C. Odell, also
of the art school.

:.

--- - - - -
SECRETARIAL and
BUSINESS TRAINING
Enter Any Time - Day and Evening Classes
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE

Founded 1915

William at State

ART CINEMA and AVC return
by Popular Demand

+ Classified Advertising +

i

HELP WANTED
BABY SITTERS wanted. Call 7253, 6-7
p.m. ) 25
WAITRESS-Full and part time. No
evening or Sunday work. Apply Nut
& Nibble Shop, 339 S. Main St. )16
ATTENTION-Former telephone opera-
tors, we have a limited number of
part time jobs to offer. Apply Michi-
gan Bell Telephone Co., 323 E. Wash-
ington St. )22
SODA BAR
FULL OR PART TIMh
Days only. Apply in person. Witham's
Drug. Corner of Forest and South
University. )20
FOR SALE
"CONN" tenor saxophone. Gold lac-
quer. "Conn Steelay" mouthpiece.
Standard2case. Excellent condition.
Phone 6326. ) 50
ROYAL STANDARD typewriter. Excel-
lent condition. Fully equipped. For
cash $50. Call 2-4401. Rm. 206 Allen-
Rumsey. )48

MISCELLANEOUS
WILL EXCHANGE 4 remaining stu-
dent tickets for 1 ticket to Minne-
sota game. Any section. Call Jean,
9158. )21
NEED GARAGE for my car relatively
near Law Club. Liberal Rental. Phone
Joe Lackey at 4145.If not in leave
number and I will call. )32
WANTED
WANTED: A Frenchman. No substi-
tutes acceptable. For conversational
purposes only. Write Box 17." )52
WANTED single garage space to rent
-preferably Liberty Street area. Call
Mr. Howland, 20720 and leave num-
ber. ) 44
WANTED: 6 foot man for size 11 hand-
knit Argyle socks. State qualifica-
tions. References not required. Box 2.
Michigan Daily. )42
DO YOU HAVE A BABY BED for sale?
I need one! Phone 2-6845. Mrs. L. M.
Bouise. )33

FRENCH DIALOGUE
Box Office Opens 2 P.M., Thursday, Oct. 2
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, OCT. 3, 4 - 8:30 P.M.
Tickets, Phone 4121, Ext. 479
HILL AUDITORIUM

ni*versity of Michigan Oratorical Association
1948 UEURSE

- Last Times

Today -

Sixth Number

35 HARLEY "74" S.V. A-1 shape. $295. WILL PAY for ride to Detroit every
Call 26824. Ask for Hopps. )4 Tuesday and, or Friday afternoon.
Call Mr. Graham, 2-3460. )12

DAN'S
illiam Street

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
LUNCHEON SPECIALS
for Wednesday, Oct. 1st
1. Chicken Pie, soup, mashed potatoes, cauli-
flower, coffee and dessert ................. 65c
2. Hamburger de Luxe, soup, french fries,
coffee and dessert ........................ 60c
3. Cold Plate, soup, cold cuts, salad, coffee
and dessert ................................55c
SOURS: 11:30 A.M. - 1:30 P.M. - 5:00 - 8:00 P.M.
O NEDAYONLY
Wed., Oct. 15
MAIL ORDERS NOW
For Best Choice of Seats
21
2 PERFORMANCES.
Matinee 3:15 Evening 8:00n
The THEATRE GUILD presents
LAU RENCE
O LIVIJER1Z ,

I

FORD-1939 convertible coupe, me-
chanically sound, radio, heater, good
tires, economical. Ladd, 1231 Olivia.
)46
REMINGTON noiseless typewriter, desk
model. Excellent condition, $55.00.
27285. )43
FOR SALE-Girl's Schwinn bike, 1 pr.
ice skates, Roller skates, riding boots.
All size 5. 2 garment bags. Phone
4973, evenings. )2
1931 BUICK-Good running condition,
$200. After 7 p.m. Phone 4583, Ad-
dress 326 E. Liberty. )40
COLLAPSIBLE BABY carriage. Prac-
tically new. $23. Call 8842. Address
1151 W. Huron. )141
SINGLE-BREASTED Kuppenheimer tux
--size 36-37; white Palm Beach suit,
size 36-37. Call Jim 7098. )26
BLANKETS: Navy surplus grey blan-
kets. All wool, new, $7.95. 12 or more,
$7.50 each. Army 100 per cent wool,
new, khaki blankets, $5.95. 12 or more,
$5.50 each. Daily, Box 15. ) 23
GAS STOVE, $5.00. Coil springs for
double bed, $2.00. Pair French doors,
$40. Phone 2-6943. }13
3 TWEED SUITS. Size 35-36. Good con-
dition. 417 E. Liberty. 2-3776, after
7 p.m. Ask for Harry. )7
FOR SALE: Baby grand piano. Kohler
& Campbell. Good condition. Phone
24394, 1722 Shadford. )17
MID-NITE BLUE formal, tails. Size 38-
40. Worn three times. Complete with
shirt and white vest. Very reason-
ably priced. Dr. W. S. Clifford. Phone
2-1487. )10
TAILS AND TUXEDO 38 long, like new,
$50. 1117 Southwick Court, Willow
village. )34
MAN'S BIKE! English three speeds.
Good condition. $43. Call Dezso Sek-
ely, 5806. )1
BICYCLE, 2 months old, 28inch wheels,
hand brakes. Phone Howard Baum-
garten, 24401. )6
Z.OYAL PORTABLE Typewriter, only
70.00 Call 8600. D. R. Anderson. )24
SCOOTER with side car, Lauson engine,

FOR RENT
ROOM and board and transportation
for male student. 21 miles from
campus. Call 27930, after 6:00. )8
ROOMS for football weekend guests in
private homes. Phone Student Room
Bureau. 22239, 6-8 p.m. )18
STUDENT will pay reasonable price
for single room in or out of town.
Call Kardy. Between 6 and 7 p.m.
)36
BUSINESS SERVICES t
BY ESTABLISHED tradition, we do all
types of sewing, alterations, formal
restyling. Hildegarde Sewing Shop,
116 E. Huron. Phone 24669. ) 29
CLOCKS-Repaired. Week service. SMS
MOVING? Rent big trailers for a dol-
lar at East Ann Arbor Trailer Co.
3304 Platt Rd., 25-9931. )5
Products. 210 N. Fourth Ave. Tel.
7082.9
RADIOS REPAIRED. Careful work
reasonable prices. Open evenings for
convenience of students. Radio Doc-
tors, 512 E. William, 2-0671. )15
FOR BEST DANCING this -fall, it's
music by TOM McNALL'S ORCH.
featuring vocals by JACKIE WARD.
Phone 2-3021 for record audition. )4
TYPING: Theses, term papers, address-
es, etc. Duplicating: Notices, form>
letters, programs. A2 Typing Service,
208 Nickels Arcade, phone 9811. )38
LOST AND FOUND
LADIES BULOVA watch with sweep
second-hand and brown cord band.
Lost near stadium on Saturday at
game. Reward. Phone 8776. )49
GOLD football pendant lost. Sentimen-
tal value. Reward. Phone 20720. Hank
Klauke. . ) 51
LOST: Lady's black and gold fountain
pen. Sentimental value. Reward. Call
2-3797. )45
SAD SACK LOST season footbpll ticket,
Section 30, Row 33. Seat 4. Reward.

- Starts Thursday -
Also
MARCH OF TIME
Cartoon - News

I

JOHN MASON BROWN, Associate
Editor of The Saturday Review of
Literature and leading Broadway
critic, appeared on the last sea-
son's Oratorical Association Lecture
Course. His first lecture here con-
firmed his national reputation as
one of the most brilliant and elo-
quent speakers on the American
platform today. Never have patrons
of the series made such urgent re-
quests for the return of any speaker
for another year. In respons to
these requests, the Oratorical Asso-
ciation is happy to announce his
agreement to come again this sea-
son. The audience is assured of a
genuine platform treat when Mr.
Brown speaks on "Broadway in
Review"-an exciting and penetrat-
ing story of the latest plays.

RETURN ENGAGEMENT
BY REQUEST!

i

COMPLETE SCHEDULE - 7 OUTSTANDING NUMBERS

Oct. 23-WALTER DURANTY and H. R. Jan. 13--JULIEN BRYAN
KNICKERBOCKER The leading creator of documentary
Two famous journalists, winners of Pul- of hisg he m , re-
itzer Prizes in Journalism, will discuss films of history in the making, will pre-
one of the vital questions of the day. sent the greatest film and lecture of his
I,)ebate: "CAN RUSSIA BE PART OF career.
ONE WORLD?" "RUSSIA REVISITED" with Motion
Pictures
Nov. 3-JACQUES CARTIER
America's unique one-man theatre, will
present a gallery of portraits, in cos- Jan. 22-JOHN MASON BROWN
tume, of the world's great actors and Associate Editor of The Saturday Ie-
their styles of acting. view of Literature and leading Broad-
"THEATRE CAVALCADE" way dramatic critic.
Nov. 20-REAR-ADM. RICHARD E. BYRD "BROADWAY IN REVIEW"
Intrepid explorer and colorful pioneer
in the world of adventure. Feb. 10-HON. ARTHUR BLISS LANE
"DISCOVERY" with Motion Pictures United States Ambassador to Poland
N a wlIT TA eV F'dhI rnt ri- . m n+ .ana

isn William Saaesfeare 's
In Technicolor

I

a

atv nu:"tnlr

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