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January 06, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TW0~ 'rn~M~cnGA_ ..IE

TUESDAY, JANUARY

Chappuis Turns in Brilliant
Performance To Pace Stars

71

-- - ---------- --------

_ __

all

Team Sets Nine
Bowl Records
(Continued from Page 1)
a decoy, and highly destructive as
a blocker.
And Weisenburger seemed to
run with added power against the
Trojans. His magnificent spinning
and faking split the Southern
California line as efficiently as
if he used an axe.
In all Fritz Crisler's Wolver-
ines established nine modern
Rose Bowl records. They were:
1. Largest point - total 49,
equalling own 1902 mark.
2. Greatest margin of victory
49 joints.
3. 491 yards total offense,
eclipsing Southern California's
42i of 1930.
4. 17 completed passes, break-
Lug old shark of 16 set by Navy
in 1924.
5. Chappuis, total offense,
6. Chappuis, most completed
pases, 14, surpassing Frank Al-
bert, Stanford and Ernie Case,
UCLA, 12.
7. Jim Brieske, seven conver-
sions, old record of four shared
by 'Ernie Smith, Southern Cali-
fornia, Hugh Morrow, Alabama,
and Don Maecitle, linois.
8. Brieske tied record for
points made by kicking, held by
Ambrose of the Mare Island,
Marines in 1918.
9. Jack Weisenburger tied El-
mer Layden's 18 point scoring
total.
From any standpoint Michigan
turned in an amazing perform-
ance. Defensively they were al-
most as good as when they had
the ball. Led by Len Ford and
Al Wistert, who smashed into the
Troy backfield, and Ed McNeil
who drifted, turned plays in and
stripped away the blockers, the'
defensive unit permitted only one
sustained drive by SC.
Dick Kempthorn broke that one
up after the men of Troy had
marched to Michigan's 13 yard
line. On sheer power the Trojans

marched down the field only to be
thwarted as Kempthorn leaped up
and intercepted George Murphy's
toss and that was the only threat-
ening gesture the Californian's
made all afternoon.
Not only did Michigan run
roughshod over the Trojans but
they made a mockery of the here-
tofore first rate pass defense
Cravath's outfit had boasted.
For the first time all season
Southern California's goal line
was crossed by the overhead
route. In the second quarter,
Chappuis busted up to the cen-
ter of the line leaped and lobbed
a toss to Bump Elliott, who
caught it on the six and breezed
in for the third Michigan score.
(see cut page 3)..
That was only the first; three
more times Michigan struck

through the air for the touch-
down. Chappuis raced to his right,
wheeled and pitched a toss in the
opposite corner to Yerges for 18
yards and a touchdown.
In the last quarter a couple of
relief pitchers took over. Hank
Fonde, flipped his second pass of
the year to Gene Derricotte for a
45 yard touchdown. Yerges, who
hadn't completed a throw all sea-
son, arched a long pass into the
corner and Dick Rifenburg outran
everybody to make a circus catch.
The play traveled 29 yards.
Weisenburger and Brieske took
care of the rest of the scoring.
And now it's all over and you
can say what you've been think-
ing all year without danger of
putting a curse on them, "that's
one of the greatest football
teams anybody ever saw."

mq

£ rtlwicA Seru
WVISHES YOU
and
LPPj few Ya.

lice

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WORTH REMEMBERING:
Squad Takes Time Out
STo Enjoy Themselves

il. L. SPITZLEY
HEATING COMPANY

(Continued from Page 1)
master of the airways, Coach Cris-
ler participated in a football tet-
a-tete with Trojan mentor Jeff
Cravath on the Hope program.
In addition to Hope's broadcast,
the nation's top gridiron visited
his home lot, Paramount Studios,
where they saw some scenes being
shot of pictures starring Ray Mil-
land, Jean Arthur, John Lund,
and Marlene Dietrich.
Jim Brieske, the most regular
subsitute, remarked that the mov-
ies are comparable to football-
"Being a stand-in is just like play-
ing third string."
Elliotts Golf With Bing
Bing Crosby, who handles a
mean golf stick as well as his vo-
cal chords, matched strokes with
Bump and Pete Elliott at the Bel-
Aire Country Club early one Sun-
day morning. A member of the
varsity links squad, Pete proved
his prowess when the chips were

down - or rather - they started
falling his way after the halfway
mark.
He seared the fairways with a
second nine two under par to take
the last eight holes from Crosby,
while the Bumper kept Bing com-
pany with two strokes over. After
the watch, Crosby was wondering
if it were true that the Elliotts
were battered up from football
practice as Pete had told him
when the match was arranged.
Another fairway duo comprised
of 190 pound tackle Captain Bruce
Hilkene and 105 pound jockey Ed-
die Arcaro looked like a slaughter.
But Arcaro knows how to whip
'em in on a golf course as well as
a race track, according to Hil-
kene.
Rifenburg Visits Santa Anita
Dick Rifenburg figured he knew
his race tracks better than the
average two-dollar laymen. Oin
opening day at Santa Anita, Rife
swore that the third in the first
was a sure bet. He knew some-
body who personally gave the
steed a shot but it must have been
a knock-out powder cause the
"sure thing" was a poor fourth.
California can boast, in addition
to Santa Anita, some of the pret-
tiest scenery in the world. A tour
on the "train of tomorrow" took
the team up to Saugus, through
mountain and desert country. As
a special treat, each player called
his home long distance from the
train's rail to short telephone. "It
certainly "seemed remarkable to
talk to my folks, while traveling
on train.

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I ii c o r p o r a t e d
Incrpoate

I

SPITZLEY-RETTENMIER
SHEET METAL COMPANY
Subsidiary

PLUMBING - HEATING - REFRIGERATION
VENTILATING - INDUSTRIAL PIPING
AIR CONDITIONING

A

-Courtesy Los Angeles Examiner.
TALENTED TOSSER-Bouncing Bob Chappuis deftly displays jump-pass form that accounted for
a potent weapon in versatile Michigan offensive that completely smothered USC. Co-star Bump
Elliott snared the heave for an appreciable gain.
Thirty-ive 'Awards Given Gridders-
Jayvees Receive Thir tv-Four Numerals

Tel. Cadillac 0840

1200 Fort St. West

Detroit 26, Michigan

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EXCLUSIVELY
IN
ANN ARBOR

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D R u 19,ULRY
ENDS HERE

Coach Fritz Crisler announced
yesterday that thirty-five mem-
bers of Michigan's all-conquering
football squad received major let-
ter awards.
Thirteen of the 'M' winners are
seniors, and nine of these were
members of Michigan's "starting
team" of twenty-two men. Elec-
tion of a team captain for the 1948
season has been postponed for two
or three weeks.
Thirty-four men received re-
serve awards, Crisler announced,
and five manager's letters were
given.
Letter-winners follow:
Jim. Brieske,. Harbor. Beach;
Bob Chappiuis, Toledo, O.;
Gene I}erricotte, Defiance, O.;
Pete Dendrinos, Muskegon; Dan
Dworsky, Sioux Falls, S.D.; Chal-
mers (Bump) and Pete Elliott,
Bloomington, Ind.; Henry Fonde,
Knoxville, Tenn.; Len Ford, Wash-
ington, D.C.; Lloyd Henneveld,
Hollanl; Donn Hershberger, Free-
port, Ill.; Bruce Hilkene, Indian-
apolis, Ind., Bob Hollway, Ann
Arbor; George Johnson, Colum-
bus, 0.; Kurt Kampe, Detroit;
Dick Kempthorn, Canton, O.;
George Kiesl, Ferndale; Ralph
Kohl, Cleveland, O.; Don Kuick,
Midland; Bob Mann, New Bern,
N.C.; Don MeClelland,NCalumet;
Ed McNeill, Toledo, 0.; Tom Pet-
erson, Racine, Wis.; Bill Pritula,
Detroit; Dick Rifenburg, Saginaw;
Quentin Sickles, Benton Harbor;
Joe. Soboleski,. Grand. Rapids;
Wally. Teninga, .Chicago,. Ill.;
Dominic. Tomasi,. Flint;. Jack
Weisenburger,. Muskegon;. J. . T.
White, River Rouge; Stu Wilkins,
Canton, 0.; Irv Wisniewski, Lam-
bertville, Alvin Wistert, Chicago,

and Howard Yerges, Pt. Pleasant,
W. Va.
Reserve awards went to:
John M. Anderson, Manistee;
L. Atchison, North Olmsted, 0.;
Robert M. Ballou, Chester, Vt.,
Richard S. Brown, Detroit; John
D. Combes, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.;
John F. Eizonas, Detroit; Robert
F. Erben, Akron, 0.; Alan Fitch,
Kensington, Md.; Daniel G. Frank,
Detroit; John Ghindia, Ecorse;
David L. Gomberg, Chicago, Ill.;
Norman Jackson, Canton, 0.;
Donald A. Jones, Detroit; John J.
Kulpinski, Detroit; Conrad B.
Kuzma, Gary, Ind.; Charles W.
Lentz, Toledo, 0.; John C. Lin-
ville, Elyria, 0.; Hugh R. Mack,
Jr., Birmingham; John E. Ma-
turo, Jr., Hamden, Conn.; James
A. Morrish, Pleasant Ridge; Frank
Nakamura, Ann Arbor; Donald

M. Nichols, Allegan; Alton S. No-
ble, Detroit; John Padjen, Jr.,
Lansing; James H. Poppy, Iron
Mountain; Prentice U. Ryan,
Grand Rapids; Ralph Salucci,
Dearborn; Irwin Small, Tarry-
town, N.Y.; Kenneth L. Smith,
Owosso; Richard Strauss, Lan-
sing; Robert E. Twining, Ann Ar-
bor; KennethJ. Varrige, Chicago,
Ill.; Edward W. Wedge, Port
Huron; John H. Wilcox, Detroit.
Manager awards went to: Wil-
liam S. Hickey (St. Man.) Grosse
Pointe; Albert R. Collins, Jr.,
Whitehall, Mont.; Howard J.
Cooper, Kalamazoo; Howard H.
Stephenson, Park Ridge, Ill.; Wal-
ter F. Yates, Lexington, Ky.
Hold Those Bonds!

R. L. Spitzley, 1911 E

GENERAL SERVICE BUILDING
ENGINEERING COLLEGE ADDITION
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
CHEMISTRY BUILDING ADDITION

IL

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AU

J. H. Spitzley, 1938E

irom

Cxperience

0 0 .

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SECETARIALand
BUSINESS TRAINING
APPROVED VETERAN'S TRAINING
THOROUGH PRACTICAL COURSES
INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION
'y HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
Founded 1915 Ann Arbor, Mich.

WE KNOW
THE &fe~t IN SPORTS

.A

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The best colors-Maize and Blue
The best nickname-Wolverines

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The ingredients of

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It's personality perfection when these three
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The best coach-Fritz Crisler
The best conference-Big Nine
The best in the Big Nine- Mic higan
The best Bowl-The Rose Bowl
The best in the Rose Bowl-Michigan
THAT'S THE BEST IN SPORTS

1 a\a.ii.! Va asa\ ! sT 1 11 111

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