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September 28, 1947 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-09-28

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28, 1947

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

'48 PRICES DOWN:
New Packards On Line
Without Production Delay

DROUGHT-STRICKEN CONTINENT:
European Governments Face Winter Privation

DETROIT, Sept. 27 -{A) -
Packard Motor Co. announced to-
day that along with the best out-
put month of the year to date it
had put its 1948 model line into
production without a single day's
stoppage of assembly lines.
George T. Christopher, Packard
president, described the accom-
plishment as "without precedent
in the industry," and disclosed
that the 1948 line will consist
mainly of three all-new eight cyl-
inder vehicles. They will include
17 different body types, .with new
"free flow" styling, four different
chassis and three new straight-
eight engines developing 130, 145
and 160 horsepower.
Discontinued are the "one
twenty" model and most of the
six cylinder units. Christopher
said production of some sixes
would continue, mainly f o r
taxicabs and for export.
Prices for some of the new mod-
els, Christopher said, are lower
than those of comparable 1947
types. He said the new 1948 super-
eight club sedan is priced at $2,665
delivered in Detroit, state taxes
extra, compared with $2,747 for
the 1947 similar model. The 1948
super-eight touring sedan is $2,-
Vet's Checks
At Post Office
Checks are being held at the
Ann Arbor Post Office for the fol-
lowing veterans:
Barrett, John W.; Barrett, Wil-
liam; Jr.; Bumns, James M.; Day-
idson, Wilbur S.; Garziere, Ernest
H.; Gryting, Loyal A.; Hooper,
George D.; Hoyt, Marian L.; Jac-
obs, Manuel; Jarvis, Willis A.;
Johnson, Edmund C.; Lamb, John
T.; Langschwager, Fred P.; Mar-
tin, William C.; Newcomb, Wil-
liam W. Jr.; Ross, Dorothy N.;
Smith, Dane E.; Seymour, George
D.; Steel, Archie; Ufford, Wil-
liam; Yaker, Charles; Zucker.
The checks listed above should
be picked up early tomorrow or
they will be returned to Colum-
b,0.
Veterans should pick up the
checks listed below by Monday,
Sept. 30.
Aliber, James A.; Bisdee,
Charles H.; Bourgeois, David J.;
Dorsett, Robert E.; Folkert, Mel-
vin B.; Hatch, Philip N.; Jenison,
Dantell A.; Landstra, Robert F.;
Mitchill, Patrick J.; McCormick,
George N.; Husk, Noyes G. 'Jr.;
Peller, James S.; Standen, Benja-
min J.; Sullivan, Roger D. (2);
Van Hock, Donald E.; Worobec,
Russell N.; Yates, Warren G.

690 compared with $2,772 for the
like 1947 vehicle.
Some prices remain unchanged.
he added, while others are in-
creased somewhat, particularly
those which did not figure in the
last announced increases.
Probably the most startling
change in the new Packard is
the "free flow" styling, in which
the lines run straight from front
to rear, with no bumps or pro-
trusions of any kind. None of
the new models has rear fend-
ers, the bodies extending over
the wheels.
Christopher said the new mod-
els, representing "the most dras-
tic change since the 'one twenty'
was brought out in 1935," origin-
ally were planned for introduction
in 1946, but were delayed a year
"because of market conditions".
Not yet ready for introduction,
the Packard president and gener-
al manager said, was a new auto-
matic transmission the company
has developed. "We know what we
want to make and the job now is
to process it," he said. He said he
believed "it might be quite a
while" before automatic trans-
missions are generally available.
Christopher said Packard re-
tailers have more than 100,000
signed orders on hand and that
the number would be higher if
the dealers "went after orders."
He reiterated that Packard
should produce 25,000 units from
Sept. 1 to the end of the year and
that its operators for the last half
of the year should show a profit
in contrast to the first six months
during which it reported a loss.
Packard's new line consists of
eights, super-eights and custom
eights and the change-over, ac-
cording to Christopher, represents
the "final fruits of the $20,000,-
000 program Packard studied at
the end of World War IL"
The new Packards, along with
prices, (delivered in Detroit, state
taxes extra) are: .
Eights, (130 horsepower, 120-
inch wheelbase) club sedan, $2,-
125 (previously $2,124); touring
sedan $2,150, (previously $2,149);
station sedan $3,350'; de luxe club
sedan $2,350; de luxe touring se-
dan $2,375. Theremwere no com-
parable previous models for the
latter three. Super-eights (145
'horsepower, 120-inch wheelbase) -
club sedan $2,665 (previously $2,-
747); touring sedan $2,690 (pre-
viously $2,772); convertible $3,-
175 (unchanged). (145 horsepow-
er, 141-inch wheelbase) -seven-
passenger sedan, $3,300; seven-
passenger limousine $3,450; de
luxe seven passenger sedan $3,650;
de luxe seven-passenger limousine
$3,800. There were no compar-
able models for the 141-inch line.

By ALVIN J. STEINKOPF
LONDON, Sept. 26-(P)-The
governments and peoples of most
of Europe look forward to a win-
ter which will bring hunger and
privation to millions, an Associ-
ated Press survey indicated today.
As the drought-stricken conti-
nent gathers in the last of its har-
vcsts-officially estimated to be
subnormal in most cases-state-
ments from many quarters stress
the need for help from abroad.
America is on almost everyone's
tongue. It is emphasized that the
need is likely to increase when
snow begins to fall.
The AP's continent-wide
survey indicated that shortages
are expected to be most acute in
16 Western European States
banded together in the Marshall
Plan for economic recovery.
Some of these countries re-
ported small surpluses of some
kinds of food which might help
their neighbors through the cold
months ahead, but in general they
appeared to be the least able to
help each other.
AgriculturalrMinisters in many
countries were saying that pros-

pects were either just "fair" or
positively discouraging, and in
some regions there were predic-
tions that millions will be fed as
poorly next winter as they were in
the most unsettled years of the
war.
In mid-September, with the
sun still shining and the gar-
dens still yielding produce, sev-
eral countries were announcing
substantial reductions in food
rations. Many careful observ-
ers said such cuts were merely
a beginning of what is in store
for Europe.
Food is only a part of the
dreary prospect. Millions will be
cold because of the fuel shortage.
In many parts of Germany
there will be no fuel for homes
except such wood as householders
are able to gather from forests
and trash heaps.
In Sweden governmental agen-
cies were able to make a precise
calculation-living rooms may be
heated to 6 degrees Fahrenheit if
the winter is mild, 50 decrees if it
is severe.
In Czechoslovakia, a house-

holder will be permitted to heat
two rooms, and other countries
were prescribing similar restric-
tions.
Privations due to cold and hun-
ger are linked with growing con-
cern over the continent's health,
and country after country re-
ported an increase in diseases as-
sociated with malnutrition and
bad housing.
Typhus, health authorities'
said, is sure to be a middle Eu-
ropean problem next winter,
infantile paralysis is alarming
but apparently is being brought
under control. But that could
not be said of tuberculosis,
which in Austria is being called
the "Vienna disease" because
of its prevalence in the nation's
capital.
Most of all, the nations are con-
cerned about food. Several which
have been comparatively well off
-Czechoslavakia, Holland, Spain
and Britain, which is pinched not
only by skimpy harvests but by
an economic crisis as well-are

f _,

reducing the rations allowed to
their populations. In virtually
every country the level of nutri-
tion is sinking.
A few countries of Eastern Eu-M
rope reported they are actually a
little better off than they were a
year ago.
Russia is supplying some grain
to Poland, Czechoslovakia, and
other eastern lands and is offer-
ing some, in exchange for other
food products, to Denmark and
Norway.
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Bought,
Rented,
Repaired,
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
0. D. MORIILL
314 South State St.
G. I. Requisitions Accepted

M'aiistream'
Offers Prizes
A series of annual literary
awards, offering this year four
award of $150 each, was announ-
ced by the editors of "Main-
stream," literary quarterly.
Of the four awards, two will
be given for the best unpublished
short story and poem or group of
poems submitted by students in
American colleges and universi-
ties. The other two awards will
go to the best story and poem sub-
mitted by trade union members.

MESSERSMITH TESTIFIES-
George S. Messersmith (above),
former secretary of state, testi-
fies before the House Un-Amer-
ican ActivitiesaCommittee in
Washington, that he wrote the
American Consul General at
Havana in 1939 urging prompt
and personal consideration of
Hann Eisler's application for a
visa to reside in the United
States.

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