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October 28, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GE TWO

'7,1 -MICIGAN DAILY

.......... ....... . ... ... . ........... . . . ....... . ............

GETTING BETTER:
Improved Frosh Display
Promise Against Jayvees

In another of their frequent
scrimmages, the freshman foot-
ball squad yesterday met the Jay-
vees and, in a skin-drenching rain,
held the B-squad to one end of the
fileld for 25 minutes.
The Jayvees, working from a
T-formation, were unable to get
an attack rolling against the
frosh, as the line, led by Charles
Cereski, John Powers, Dick Byce
and John Hess, swarmed into the
jayvee backfield time and again
to pull down the ball handler be-
fore he could get started.
Fast-Charging Line
Before they were through
for the day, Cereski and Powers,
the guards, were breaking
through to tackle jayvee quar-
terback, Irv Small, before he
could even hand off the ball.
The line-backing of Carl Kraeg-
er, Bob Lauer, and Amato Contino
matched the fine play of the line.
The freshman took the ball for
the last 10 minutes of play and
moved half the length of the field,
mainly on a long pass From Russ
Osterman to Hess. Like the Jay-
vees, the frosh ground game was
seriously hampered by the muddy
field, although they made many
short gains through the B-squad
line.
Unlike the Jayvees, who fum-
YOUR APPEARANCE
IS IMPORTANT!
We feature
for discriminating men:
* Personality styling
* Crew-cuts
" Scalp & Facial treatments
10 BARBERS, NO WAITING
"Tonsorial Queries Invited"
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State

bled the ball away once and lost it
twice on pass interceptions with-
in the first 10 minutes they had
the ball, the freshman did not lose
the ball once.
Frosh Hold Ball
Wally Weber, freshman football
coach, praised the spirit of his
squad and said that it has shown
great improvement in the past five
weeks, but added that the sloppy
condition of the field gave no true
indication of the ability of the two
teams.
Spartfans Seek
To Overcome
Guerre' s Loss
EAST LANSING, Oct. 27-(/P)-
Today was gloomy Monday at the
Michigan State College football
camp.
George Guerre, star Spartan
back, was in the college hospital,
listening to his bones knit. Guerre,
a fighter both off and on the
field, already is planning to try
out for track this winter after his
broken right leg heals so as to be
ready for another season of foot-
ball in 1948.
Head Coach Biggie Munn took
it easy on the rest of the squad
during the brief afternoon work-
out. Unavoidably, most of the ses-
sion was devoted to a post-mortem
on Saturday's 7-6 defeat by Ken-
tucky.
The Spartans are convinced
that's one game they should have
won. They figure they outplayed
Kentucky, as proven by the statis-
tics, and were victims of a series of
bad breaks that included a fumble
on the Wildcat six-inch line and
the crippling injury to. Guerre.

Cagers Stress
Offensive Play
In First Drills
There seems to be no doubt
that the current edition of the
Wolverine cagers are going to
feature the same sort of game
they did last year with the only
difference being that they now
have one valuable year of experi-
ence behind them.-
Cowles Likes Smooth Passes
In the workouts to date the
emphasis has been on atgood tight
defense and a steady, deliberate
offense. Coach Cowles is standing
pat on his belief that a smooth
passing team will whip the fire-
wagon sort of playing the cagers
come up against in most of their
games.
Yesterday the accent was on of-
fensive passing by the guards.
Varying pot-shots with fast passes
into the center and to the for-
wards Morrell, Mikulich and Har-
rison were scoring well consider-
ing that practice has just gotten
under way.
Practice on IM Courts
With the regular floor at Yost
Fieldhouse out of playing condi-
tion due to the installation of
glass backboards and relining of
the boards, the cagers are still
using one of the courts in the In-
tramural Building. It won't be
long, however, before the boys go
back "home." At that time the
call will go out for all prospec-
tive cagers to report for tryouts.

Tomasi, Wilkins, Weisenburger
Petersoll Out For Remainder of

Crisler Cites Illini Passing
As Gridders Drill for Game

Injured;
Season

"Purdue didn't make it any
easier for us by beating Illinois;
Saturday," declared Coach Fritz{
Crisler yesterday as he began to
prepare his Wolverine charges for
this week's invasion of Cham-
paign's Memorial Stadium.
"Illinois will probably be the
fastest team we will meet all sea-
son," continued the Wolverine
grid master. "It is a well-balanced
team, with fast, fine backs inj
Jack Pierce, Paul Patterson,.
Dwight Eddleman, and Art Dufel-?
Meier and an excellent passer in{
Perry Moss." '
Whether Michigan will em-
ploy a five-man backfield on de-
fense to thwart Moss' aerials as
did the Boilermakcrs, is not yet
known.
Coach Crisler stated that he was
mighty proud of the way his
Wolverines played against Min-
nesota. He said that Michigan's
tackling improved as compared
with the unimpressive showing
against Northwestern.
As all the 85,000 fans in the
jammed Michigan Stadium Satur-
day will attest, it was the Gopher
line that slowed down the Wol-
verine scoring machine which
romped to previous lop-sided de-

cisions over Michigan State, Stan-
ford, Pittsburgh. and Northwest-
ern.
And the Wolverine coach, who
directed the grid fortunes at
Minnesota several years ago,
also had nothing but praise for
the Gopher forward wall. "It
was the best line Minnesota has
thrown against us in ten years
of competition," said Crisler.
As a result of Minnesota's
straightaway power, three Wol-
verines were still nursing various
bruises and bumps. Dom Tomasi
and Stu Wilkins, first-string
guards, sustained minor shoulder
injuries while Jack Weisenburger,
hard-hitting fullback and leading
ground gainer, received a slight
knee injury. All are expected to
see action at Illinois.
But the biggest name on the
Wolverine injury list remained
Dick Kempthorn, the brilliant de-
fensive fullback who was injured
in the second quarter of the Pitt
game. He missed his second
straight game Saturday, but he
may be ready for the speedy Illi-
nois backs this week.
It was also announced yester-
day that Tom Peterson, the oth-
er Michigan fullback who suf-
fered a cracked rib in the
Northwestern battle, may be out
for the rest of theseason.
Bump Elliott, who scored the
first touchdown against the Goph-
ers on a pass from Bob Chappuis,
saw 49 minutes of action-more
than any other member of the
squad. Center J. T. White, whose
pass interception late in the game
completely sank Minnesota's scor-
ing opportunities, played one min-
ute less than Elliott.
. . . DO YOU KNOW that
Michigan's first All-American
was the incomparable Willie
Heston who was honored by
Walter Camp in 1903 and 1904.
The last Wolverines to be so
honored were Merv Pregulman
and Bill Daley who made it in
1943. Between these dates Mich-
igan has had 28 All-Americans.

Purdue Coach
Modest Over
Illini Triumph
By The Associated Press
CHICAGO, Oct. 27-Would Stu
Holcomb, whose Purdue Boiler-
makers upset Illinois, 14-7, last
Saturday, like another crack at
Notre Dame's fighting Irish, who
beat his club, 22-7, three Satur-
days ago?
"Hell, no," Holcomb told the'
Herald - American Quarterback
meeting today. "Once a season is
enough against that outfit."
Purdue "Talking Rose Bowl"
Holcomb, former aide to Earl
Blaik at Army and a strong can-
didate for Coach of the Year laur-
els in his first Purdue season, said
his Boilermakers emerged from
their triumph over favored Illinois
"talking Rose Bowl."
"But honestly, we're not that
good," he grinned, "and the dog-
gone balloon even may burst on
us this Saturday against Iowa."
Have Chance for Title
Should Illinois defeat Michigan
at Champaign this Saturday, and
Purdue beat Iowa, Minnesota and
Indiana in its remaining confer-
ence games, the Boilermakers
could finish in a title tie and get
Rose Bowl consideration.
Ilini To Make
LineupShifts
CHAMPAIGN, Ill., Oct. 27-(P)
-Several lineup changes may be
made by Coach Ray Eliot this
week as he prepares Illinois for its
big Homecoming game against un-
defeated Michigan Saturday.
Although hinting at a shakeup,
Eliot refused today to divulge any
specific shifts in- advance of the
game.
Many of his players are handi-
capped with minor injuries after
two successive weeks of battering
against formidable defenses set up
by Minnesota and Purdue. Lou
Levanti, Russ Steger, Perry Moss,
Jocko Wrenn and Lou Agase, all
varsity starters, are on the injury
list. Trainer Ike Hill said all prob-
ably would be in shape for the
Wolverines.

Denison College will be the
sponsoring school in the Midwest
Collegiate Sailing Association re-
gatta that will be held this Satur-
day and Sunday on the waters of
Whitmore Lake.
Called the Denison Invitational
Trophy Regatta, it will be spon-
sored annually by Denison and the
winning college will receive a per-
petual trophy, while individual
cups will be given to the crews of
the boats finishing first, second
and third in the race.
The meet will be open to all
schools in the midwest who wish
to participate regardless of
whether they are members of
the Association. At present
there :are five member schools,
Michigan, Denison, Michigan
State, Northwestern and
Youngstown.
On Saturday night, the Associ-
ation will hold its annual meeting
and election of officers at a ban-
quet. The time and location will
be announced later.
SERVING HOURS:
11 A.M.-1:30 P.M. 5-7 P.M.
"Known for Good Food"
The TAVERN
CAFETERIA
338 Maynard Street
REEDS -- STR INGS
We carry VAN DORN REEDS
Complete
Musical Repair
PAUL'S
MUSICAL REPAIR
209 E. Washington Ph. 8132

Up to now, the Michigan Sail-
ing Club has borne the brunt of
the responsibility for promoting
interest in collegiate sailing in the
midwest.
The greatest difficulty con-
fronting the Michigan Club is
one of finance. The club re-
ceives no money from the Uni-
versity although it has always
represented the school in na-
tional regattas. As a result, the
number of boats that the club is
able to have is dependent on the
dues which it receives from its
members.
The great interest in sailing
here at the University is shown by
the large number of applications
that the club has received from
students thus far this term. The
club, however, is forced to restrict
membership in direct proportion
to the number of boats available.
At present there are about seven
dinghies for the 60 members of the
club.

Denison To Sponsor Sailing
Regatta at Whitmore Lake
______ 0

Heyliger Sees Winning Year
With 12 Pucksters Returning
21 Game Schedule Tentatively Arranged;
Practice Drills Begin Monday at Coliseum

STATE
Friday, Oct. 31
at 12 midnight
2 Horror Shows
"BLACK CAT"

B

I

'r
r

rl

and
"BLACK FRIDAY"I

EVERYBODY!
FRATERNITIES! SORORITIES!
DANCING PICNICS
SUSTERKA LAKE
West of Belleville on Huron River Drive
Hay Rides by Arrangement
50660 Huron River Drive Call Ypsi 1038-W2
THOMPSON BARBERS
announce the winnahs of last week's
football score guessing contest.
Each Winnalh Receives $5.00 Cash
CHARLES MONTGOMERY
MARTIN S. MAYER
You may be the lucky one this week. Come in
and guess on the Michigan-Illinois' game. It's
for free.
THOMPSON BARBERS
Liberty at Maynard

r'

With the start of the 1947-48
hockey season only five weeks
away, Coach Vic Heyliger an-
nounced today that practice at the
Coliseum for the approaching sea-
son would begin next Monday.
A tentative 21 game schedule
has been planned for the Michigan
pucksters and its final approval
and subsequent publication is ex-
pected within the next two weeks.
Sounding an optimistic note,
Heyliger explained that his
fourth year at Michigan as head
mentor of the ice sport would be
greatly facilitated by the nu-
cleus of veteran players that will
be on hand for the first practice
session.
The forward line boasts such
stalwarts as Gordon MacMillan.
high-scorer for the Michigan six
in the past two years. Al Renfrew,
who shared the scoring honors
with MacMillan last year, Walter
Gacek, Bill Jacobson, Ted Greer,'
and Sam Steadman, while the de-
fense presents an imposing wall
of experience in Capt. Connie Hill,
Bob Marshall, Ross Smith, Herb
Upton, and Dick Starrack.
The cage will again be tended
by Jack MacDonald whose bril-
liant saves and otherwise stellar
defensive action in the past have
made him an integral part of the
Blue and Gold aggregation.
Augmenting this powerful
array in the second half of the
season will be Neil Celley and
Wally Grant, whose return from
service is expected momentarily.
Hleyliger placed the utmost im-
portance on these two men, ex-
plaining that their brief stay on
the Michigan rinks has con-
vinced him of their capable
prowess in handling the elu-
sive puck.
Newcomers to the Wolverine
squad will include Owen McAr-
die, Al Nadeau, Dave Krumma and
Paul Fontane, all of whom are ex-
pected to bolster the fordward
wall.
An exhibition match with Jack
Adams' Detroit Red Wings has
been set for November 27 at the
Coliseum, and the game will offer

a good indication of the ability of
the Heyligermen. Last year the
Wolverines dropped a hard-fought
contest to the Detroit profession-
als by a 7-5 county.
Last year's team had a record of
13 victories, eight losses, and one
tie, winning ten games in succes-
sion in the middle of the season.
The aggregation piled up a total of
111 goals and 124 assists for a
grand total of 235 points.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

I

FULLEST MEASURE
OF DI N I NG PLEASURE
BREAKFAST, LUNCHEON,
and DINNER
AFTER-THEATRE SNACKS
OPEN 7:30 A.M.-11:30 P.M.
S313SOUTH STATE

EXCHANGE
HAVE TWO FRED WARING tickets for
Saturday night. Would like totWex-
change them for two on Friday. Call
25-8433. )78
BUSINESS SERVICES
DANCE BAND; social chairmen, the
Uptown Six, is now available for
dancing engagements. Call H. Jack-
son. 23189. )76
BY ESTABLISHED tradition we do all
types of sewing, alterations, formal
restyling. Hildegarde Sewing Shop.
116 E. Huron. Phone 24669. )29
HOOVER SPECIALIST, SERVICE and
sales. Buy through Goodyear store.
For service call A. A. 2-0298. W. O.
Taylor, 1612 Brooklyn, Ann Arbor.)32
HELP WANTED
CHOOSE a position in the telephone
company friendly employment. Ad-
visors will be glad to talk it over
with you. Apply employment office,
2nd floor; 321 E. Washington. )14
BOY FOR SERVING and dishwashing
in private homerinmreturn for 2
meals daily and room with private

I

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Eversharp pencil, varsity night.
Row 12, Hill Auditorium. Call 2-2620,
after 5. Reward. )22
LOST: Single strand pearls, knotted
separately. Friday night. Really great
sentimental value. Cash reward. Call
367 Jordan Hall if you have them-
please!.)5
BROWN BRIEF case containing books
in Michigan Union last Tuesday. Re-
ward. Phone 5093. Robert Pagenkopf.
)42
LOST-Defender watch. Sweep-second
hand in Union Friday. Liberal Re-
ward. 24471, room 3059. )52
BLUE AND GOLD Eversharp ball point
pen. Between Mary Lee and E. Uni-
versity. Call 21146. )91
LOST: Small green alligator purse.
Containing sorority and fraternity
pins. Reward. Call Jan Farley, 2-
3159. ).55
LOST: A'black leather zipper notebook.
Keep book but return notes please.
Reward. Phone 2-2036. )18
LOST: Thursday Parker '51, black sil-
yer pen between Jordan and campus.
Call 2-4561, room 581. Reward. )3
LOST: Beagle hound, female called
"Sad" wearing collar with broken
chain. 13 inches high, markings of
black, white, tan. $10.00 reward. Call
2-5225. )69
WHOEVER borrowed the black Raleigh
bicycle Sunday night from- the rack
at the League Building - I wish
you'd please put the thing back. And
the camera in the basket, too. )53
Continuous from 1 P.M.
-----NOW - --- -

U

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PASSENGERS RELY
ON COCA-COLA AND
TRAVEL REFRESH-ED

bath. Cali 7380, after 7 p.m.

) 62

WANTED TO RENT
ROOM for medical student near cam-
pus. Call 2-0421. )79

FOR RENT
$1.00 RENTS big utility trailer at East
Ann Arbor Trailer Co. Open evenings,
3304 Platt Rd., 25-9931. )33
WANTED
THREE TICKETS for Illinois game. Call
Glenn Carpenter, 2-3172 around 6.
) 85
ONE OR MORE TICKETS to Illinois
football game. Phone 2-6616. )11
SIX UNEMPLOYED Bongo drummers
want to see Stan Kenton. Call "Bull"
Zerman, 2-2926. )72
FOR SALE
"CONN" E flat alto silver saxophone.
Standard case and two mouthpieces.
Excellent condition $125 cash. Call
Bev. Hawes, 25570. )63
TYPEWRITER-Corona portable. Excel-
lent condition. Best offer! Portable
self-charging plug-in radio. Perfect
condition. $30. 2-8250 or come to 1113
Packard. )22
WHIZZER motor bike. New, save! Light
and generator. Basket. Best offer!
2-8250 or come to 1113 Packard. )47
CANARIES, certified singers, $10 up.
Parakeets, Finches, bird supplies,
cages.' 562 South Seventh. Phone
5330. )40
WHITE BROADCLOTH SHIRTS - All
standard sizes. 4 for $9.00. Striped pa-
jamas, 3 for $10.00. Excellent quality.
Sorry, no smaller quantities at these
low prices. Call Arnold. 8768. )92
GIRL'S BICYCLE: Good condition. 1105
Oakland. Phone 7664. )67
HOUSE TRAILER 27 foot, 3-room, de-
luxe tandem. Bottle gas, oil heat, easy
chair, studio couch, inner spring bed,
venetian blinds, drapes, 1000 S. Main
Evenings and weekends. )10
LATE '45 Cushman motor scooter, side-
kar, windshield; recently overhauled;
economical and fast transportation.
Box 20, Daily. )19
MADE IN ITALY: Accordian. 120 bass
Italian "Moreschi", 4 shift, beauti-
ful tone. Sacrifice for $200.00 this
week only. Phone 2-2366. )73
TABLECLOTHS, aprons, bridge table
covers, colorful patterns in dirt-proof
plastic. Ideal for gifts. 2-4270, eve-
nings. )38
[ONE cabinet. model radio, one table
model combination, one cabinet mod-
el combination. Call 4489. )15
Give Now-To Your
Community Fund

proach under store-trained faculty.
Classes are combined with paid store
work. Students are usually placed be-
fore graduation. Co-educational. Mas-
ter's degree. Approved by Veterans
Administration. Four full-tuition schol-
arships available. Limited enrollment,
apply early. Write for Bureau Bulletin C.
RESEARCH BUREAU QR RETAIL TRAINING
UNIVERSITY OF PITTSB tH . Pittsburgh It, Pa.

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PLAN A CAREER
IN RETAILING
One-year Course
for College Graduates

" Prepare to step into a responsible
executive position in the retailing field:
buying, advertising, fashion, personnel.
Specialized training, exclusively for col-
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personnel management, textiles, store
organization, sales promotion, and all
phases of store activity. Realistic ap-

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GOOD SEATS LEFTr..
Fri., Oct. 31 Sat., Nov. 1
BOX OFFICE SALES
Daily 11-12; 2-5
at
Hill Auditorium Box Office

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