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October 04, 1946 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-04

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FUJDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1946

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY ~

PAGE THREE

Cards Stave Off inth Inning Rally

To Cop Flag

NO JOY IN FLATBUSH:
Cardinal Dressing Room
In Bedlam After Win

By CLARK BAKER
Daily Sports Editor

Dickson Pitches Brilliantly For Eight
Stanzas In 8-4 Victory Over Brooklyn

EBBETS FIELD, Brooklyn, Oct. 3
--(P)-It was nice and quiet in the
Cardinal dugout about 4:30 p.m. to-
day-like a working boiler factory
being hit by an atom bomb-but even
over the National League champion-
ship roar you could hear rookie
catcher Joe Garagiola hollering the
victory cry.
Clad only in a towel that flapped
off his shoulder, husky Joe stomped
The first Friday night open
house at the Sports Building for
Veterans and their wives will take
place tonight from 7:00 to 9:30.
The program whichproved so pop-
ular last term will' be resumed as
a weekly feature with facilities
provided in the following sports:
basketball, volleyball, tennis, bad-
minton, paddleball, and swim-
ming.

bare-foot through the dressing room

from the shower yelling:
"There'll be no joy in Flatbush to-
night."
And eventhough a chorus was giv-
ing out with "I Want A Girl Just
Like The Girl Who Married Dear Old
Dad" in one corner, and assorted rebel
yells were floating around from all
sides, from such citizens asCountry
Slaughter and Ernie Dusak, Joe
managed to make himself heard.
But no one cared, least of all Man-
ager' Eddie Dyer and his conquering
Cardinal crew who poured it on the
Dodgers 8-4 today, with Murry Dick-
son serving up a two-hitter for eight
innings and Harry (The Cat) Bre-
cheen coming on to put out the fire
in the ninth, when the Brooklyns fin-
ally came to life.
"They've got a lot of guts, those
Dodgers," Dyer admitted afterward.

There has been a little question bothering us for some time. Just how
many persons will Michigan Stadium accommodate between the goal lines?
We have heard all sorts of guesses, most of them somewhat larger than the
figure we arrived at after a half-hour of on-the-spot calculations.
According to our figures and we now advance them as the last word
(until a better one comes along, anyway), the 14 sections of Michigan
Stadium located between the goal lines will hold 25,267 persons. (When
the bleachers are erected, there are an additional 2,218 seats.)
That means that the Michigan student body numbering over 18,000
were it to be entirely seated between the goal lines, would have to be seated
on both sides of the field. Okay, there's room for the entire student body be-
tween the goal lines. Why aren't they sitting there? For that answer we
went to Mr. Andrew Baker, ticket manager.
Mr. Baker informed us that the student seats started with half of sec-
tion 24 and proceeded well around into the end zone. The remainder of sec-
tion 24 and the other four sections on the Michigan side of the field are
occupied by Stadium bond-holders who still retain their privileges in the
best seats and the Michigan faculty and administrative officials.
On the far side of the field the seven sections between the goal
lines are held by the visiting teams, Wolverine M-winners and season
ticket holders. It might also be mentioned that the bond-holders have
a choice of the best seats on either a season or individual ticket basis.
Much of the student objection to the present seating plan has stem-
med from the mistaken belief of many that there are more than 25,000
seats, between the goal lines. In order to get better seats for the student
body, one or more of the above-mentioned groups must be pushed into the
end zone.
Individual griping and bitter letters will not do the trick. There
must be an organized effort, an effort that has complete knowledge of
the entire seating problem. Mr. Baker has stated that there are no hid-
den facts about the seating question and that all the facts are open to
the public.
Last spring the student body elected a Student Legislature. So far this
body has spent much time splitting hairs about whether senior John Jones
should be stuck in section 33 or section 27 and threatening everything but
corporeal punishment for a group of bewildered underclassmen. That will
hardly alleviate the problem in 1947.
We propose, therefore, that the Student Legislature appoint a
committee to delve into the student seating problem immediately, to
get all the details available, and then to work out a new arrangement
for a better student section to be presented no later than this spring to
the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics.
It is obvious that nothing can be done'to alter the 1946 situation.
It is probable that the problem will not be solved to the satisfaction of
the student body next year, either, but the Student Legislature has it
within its power to start the ball rolling.
Let's not spend our time quibbling about whether the seniors should
get goal-line or end zone seats. Let's get the whole student body the best
seats in the stadium.
Final Major League Standings

Brecheen Fans Two
To Halt Dodger Threat
By The Associated Press
BROOKLYN, Oct. 3-A hair-rais-
ing ninth inning rally by Brooklyn's
battling Dodgers fell short today and
the St. Louis Cardinals wrapped up
their fourth National League Pen-
nant in five years by taking the sec-
ond and deciding game of their un-
precedented play-off series, 8 to 4,
before a heart-broken throng of 31,-
875 at Ebbets Field.
Held to two hits by Murry Dick-
son, a trim righthander, for the first
eight frames, Leo Durocher's scrap-
pers slugged the pride of Tracy, Mo.,
from the hill with their final gasp
in the last inning and rushed three
runs across before Harry (The Cat)
Brecheen finally stunned them into
submission with two season-ending
strikeouts.
Schultz Fans
The bases still were filled with
Dodgers when Howie Schultz, tall
Dodger pinch-hitter who had clouted
a home run in the opening game of
the play-off at St. Louis, swung from
his heels at a third strike-and
missed.
Up to the time the Dodgers put on
their delayed explosion, Dickson had
hurled masterful ball and appeared to
have the situation entirely in hand.
After yielding two singles-one of
them very scratchy-in the opening
round, he had set the Brooklyns down
without a semblance of a safety in
the seven succeeding innings. Only
one Dodger hit a ball out of the in-
field during that brilliant stretch.
Cards Get 13 Hits
The Cardinals in the meantime
had pounded six Brooklyn chunkers
for 13 solid blows, including three
fence-busting triples and a brace of
doubles, and had piled up a com-
manding 8-1 lead. Many fans began
leaving the park well before the home
team faced Dickson for the last time.
Nobody expected anything to happen,
really.
Augie Galan, who had snared one
of the first-inning hits off Dickson,
opened the excitement with a two-
bagger into right center field to bring
the crowd to its feet, but they all sat
right down again when Dixie Walker,
who failed to get a hit in the play-off,
lofted to center.

At that juncture Ed Stevens, who
had knocked Galan in with Brook-
lyn's run in the first, swatted a ter-
rific triple deep into the corner be-
tween right and centerfield to drive
Augie in again. Carl Furillo followed
with a clean single to center which
counted Stevens, and when Dickson
wavered and walked Pee Wee Reese,
Manager Eddie Dyer reluctantly
waved Brecheen in from the bull pen.

Bruce Edwards, husky young Dodg-
er catcher, greeted the Card south-
paw with a ringing blow into left to
bring Furillo home, and by that time
the stands were a bedlam. The roar
probably could have been heard the
other side of the East River when
Cookie Lavagetto batted for Harry
Taylor, sixth of the Brooklyn twirl-
ers, and worked Brecheen for a walk
to load the bases.

r

NEW STYLES FIRST AT WILD'S

PLEATED
TAPE RED
TROUSERS

N , LONG LOW
INSIDE PEN AND
PENCIL POCKET

ROLL LAPELS

LOW SET POCKETS
BROAD SHOULDERS
-
(7

TRIFLES MAKE DISTINCTION
BUT DISTINCTION IS NO TRiFLE
ai liff :rmlw DETAILED
FOR DISTINCTION

Wild's
STATE STREET ON THE CAMPUS

;m-

F

The Original B-15 FLIGHT JACKET, Mouton Collar
Alpaca Lining, Including Sleeves
GALEY & LORD GABARDINE
Color: Taupe Only. Sizes 36-46 $I
Also Cotton and Flannel Pajamas
Ann Arbor CUT-RATE Clothing
113 South Main Street

NATIONAL LEAGUE

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Last
W L Pet. GB Seas.
St. Louis ... 98 58 .628 '.. 2
Brooklyn .. 96 60 .615 2 3
Chicago .... 82 71 .536 141 1
Boston ......81 72 .529 15z 6
Philadel. .. 69 85 .448 28 8
Cincinnati .. 67 87 .435 30 7
Pittsburgh .. 63 91 .409 34 4
New York .. 61 93 .396 36 5

WL
Boston .... 104 50
Detroit .... 92 62
New York .. 87 67
Washington. 76 78
Chicago ... 74 80
Cleveland .. 68 86
St. Louis .. 66 88
Philadel. .. 49 105

Pct.
.675
.597
.565
.494
.481
.442
.429
.318

GB
12
17
28
30
36
38
55

Last
Seas.
7
1
4
2
6
5
3
8

BOOKS ANE.
THE PRESENT BOOK SHORTAGE CAN BE HELPED
IF YOU WILL SELL ALL OF THE TEXTBOOKS YOU

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BICYCLE BICYCLES NEW AND
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