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October 03, 1946 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-03

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THtRS DA-Y, OCTOBERL 3,1946

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TM

__.. _ __y_

Hawkeyes

Loom

Dangerous

After

Impressive

Victories

c

Surprising Iowa Boasts
Flashy Back in Tunnell
Hoerner, Sullivan, Smith Also Provide
Power Punch for Strong Anderson Eleven
By DES HOWARTH
Just two short weeks ago the Iowa game was regarded as probably tlh
softest touch on a none too soft Wolverine grid schedule. Now, however, the
Hawkeyes are regarded with more respect by Coach Fritz Crisler and his
boys, for the men from the tall corn country have since played two ball
games and won both in an impressive manner.
Eddie Anderson's outfit got off to a ;--

AP Sport Flashes

Dodgers, Cards Clash In Important
Playoff Game At Eb bets Field Today

Series Date

Set

good start with an overwhelming
39-0 win over North Dakota. That
in itself didn't mean much, but when
the Hawks pulled the Big Nine's sur-
prise of the week by dumping Pur-
due, 16-0, fans and writers began to
take notice.
Not that we're trying to beat the
drum to stir up ticket sales for
this Saturday's set-to, but we do
think that this game may prove
highly interesting. Michigan
should win but will probably be
hard pressed-much more so than
was previously expected.
e
The main reason for this conclu-
sion is the fact that Anderson is back
at the helm after three years ab-
sence. During those three years the
Hawks won only one Conference
game. Like all teams this year no
one could say with certainty just
which teams would be -"weak and
which would be strong because of the
returning veterans situation. From
all indications it would seem that
the early season dope was slightly
off, failing to take Anderson's return
into account and picking Iowa to
play doormat for the Big Nine again
this year.
It's doubtful if Anderson has the
makings of another 1939 team which
was the surprise of the Conference
and lost only one game-that to
Michigan. However, the Iowans
have a quartet of good backs and a
beefy line averaging 208 pounds
which may continue to cause trouble
for everybody this year.
In the Purdue game the Hawk-
eyes uncovered a pair of potential
stars in Bob Sullivan an'd Negro
Emlen Tunnell, both tailbacks. To-
gether they were personally res-
ponsible for Iowa's 16 points, Tun-
nell tallying- the two touchdowns
While Sullivan booted a field goal
and converted once.
Another back to bear watching is
Bob Smith who spearheaded the
North Dakota game victory. Smith
has been around in a football way of

speaking, Last year he played ball
at Tulsa and also gained experience
with the Iowa Seahawks, as did Sul-
livan. Dick Hoerner, first string full-
back may be remembered for his
stellar play here in Ann Arbor four
years ago.
In the twelve game series to date
the Wolverines have a wide advan-
tage. The Iowans won the initial en-
counter in 1900, 28-5. But they paid
dearly for it as they were thumped
50-0 the following year and then.
slaughtered 107-0 in 1902. Those
were the first of "Hurry-Up" Yost's
point-a-minute teams.
After a long lapse, the two
schools resumed hostilities in 1923.
Since then the scores have been,
pretty close. Iowa won again 9-3
in 24 and played a scoreless tie
with the Wolverines in '29.
Probably the most exciting game in
the series occurred in the '37 game de-
spite the fact neither team was a
threat in the Conference race. Fred-
dy Trosko's placekick climaxed an
uphill fight and 7-6 victory for the
Maize and Blue.
Tom Harmon and company spoiled
an otherwise perfect year for the
Hawks in '39. With Nile Kinnick
pitching one of the longest passes
thrown in the stadium;, the Iowans
took an early lead. Then the Wolver-
ines capitalized on four breaks and
scored each time with the All-Ameri-
can Harmon scoring all the points
for a 27-7 win. Iowa's last hope was
shattered when Tom grabbed a Kin-
nick pass on his own five and scamp-
ered the remaining 95 for his final
touchdown.
In 1941 the Hawks came within an
ace of upsetting a highly favored
Michigan squad in the rain.
All second-semester freshmen
and sophomores interested in
working on The-Daily sports staff,
report at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow to
The Daily sport staff.

CINCINNATI, Oct. 2-(P)-The
World Series will open in the Na-
tional League entry's ballpark on
Sunday, Oct. 6, weather permitting,
the office of Baseball Commissioner
A. B. Chandler announced today.
Walter M. Mulbry, secretary-treas-
urer of baseball, said the commis-
sioner decided on the opening date
after the St. Louis-Brooklyn dead-
lockfor the pennant made the two-
cut-of-three playoff series necessary.
The series was originally scheduled
to open Oct. 1.
If St. Louis wins the National
League pennant, Mulbry said, there
will be a day off allowed for travel
to Boston following the first two
games at Sportsman's Park. If a
sixth game is necessary, another day
cff will be allowed for travel back to
St. Louis.
Should Brooklyn win,aMulbry con-
tinued, the first six games will be
played on consecutive days.
* *
Texas Open Starts
FORT WORTH, Tex., Oct. 2-()
-Playing the course they learned by
every weary yard as caddies, wee
Ben Hogan and tall Byron Nelson
start tomorrow as favorites in the
second annual $10,000 Fort Worth
open golf tournament.
Hogan, winner of twelve tourna-
ments this year while amassing $37,-

877 as the game's top money-winner,
comes here fresh fromvictory in the
Dallas open last'week-end.
Nelson, the Denton, Tex., farmer,
who hasn't played in a tournament
since the National PGA some six
weeks ago, having quit the regular
tournament trail, has been practic-
ing on the par 37-34--71 6,350-yard
Glen Garden course and shading
regulations figures easily.
Cronin Wans Limit
BOSTON, Oct. 2-(A)-Manager
Joe Cronin of the Champion Boston
Red Sox today called for the limiting
of any major league penant race
play-offs in the future to one game.
Cronin, who is having headaches
trying to keep his Red Sox keyed up
for the world series, said a lesson
could be learned from the injury to
Ted Williams in an exhibition game
with American League All Stars yes-
terday, which the Sox won 2-0.
Williams, who suffered a bruised
right elbow after being hit by a
pitched ball, was reported recovering
sufficiently so that he would be ready
for the blue-ribbon classic.
But, Cronin asserted, Williams
probably would never have been hurt
if the Dodgers-Cardinals playoff had
been held to one game.
Cronin declared it was time the
club owners did something about re-
vising some uniform play-off sys-
tem and suggested one game would
be enough to decide ties.

Hatten or Highe Will
Try To Even Series
By The Associated Press
BROOKLYN, Oct. 2 - A chast-
ened but still combative bunch of
Brooklyn Dodgers rolled back, to
their home park today for their date
with destiny and the St. Louis Card-
inals at 12:30 p.m. (CST) tomor-
row.
Walloped 4 to 2 in the opening
tussle of their epic best of three
playoff for the National League pen-
nant, the "Ferocious Gentlemen"
from Flatbush face sudden extinc-
tion unless they can come back and
square the set at Ebbets Field.
Cards Need Only One
The Cardinals, hot and rolling and
feeling their collective oats after
smacking five Dodger hurlers for a
dozen hits in yesterday's fray, need
only to. repeat the dose to win the
flag they virtually were conceded at
the season's beginning.
Both clubs reached here in mid-
afternoon yesterday after making the
long overnight ride from the banks
of the Mississippi. Perhaps signifi-
cantly, the Cardinal Special was a
little in the lead all the way.
Dodgers Still Confident
Although the Dodgers engaged in
no whooping and hollering in the
aisles, they were not as gloomy a
set of young men as might have
seemed justified by the jolting they

received from Howie Pollett and the
rest of the Cards in the opener.
Whatever else might be said about
them, they still have remarkable
faith in their abilities.
"What's the use in moaning?"
asked Leo Durocher, the old dugout
philosopher. "We've felt like this
AU-Stars- Top Bosox
In Second Contest
BOSTON, Oct. 2- (P) -Scoring
once in the second, twice in the sixth
and again in the seventh an Ameri-
can League all-star team today de-
feated the pennant winning Red Sox
4-2 to even their three game exhibi-
tion series at one victory apiece.
The last of the three games, ar-
ranged in a hurry to keep the Sox
sharp for the World Series will end
tomorrow.

before, but things have always turned
out to be better the next day. Things
will look a lot different tomorrow
night."
Hatten or Higbe To Start
Leo claimed today he was unde-
cided whether to throw his veteran
ace, Kirby Higbe, or the rookie left
hander, Joe Hatten, at the Red Birds
tomorrow, but Leo was not believed
to be as undecided as he made out.
Although Manager Eddie Dyer of
the Cards was supposed to be wa-
vering between Murray Dickson, a
right hander, and Harry (The Cat)
Brecheen, a portsider, as the man
to go out tomorrow and pitch his
club into the World Series, the Dodg-
ers themselves fully expected to face
Brecheen.
Most of today's second guessing
concerned Durocher's choice of the
I college kid, Branca, to pitch the op-
ener.

Amazindw trtwsperhta,

DAILY OFFICIAL

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DO-RO"THY MAYNOR
I N EX T RA C ONC ER T
MONDAY, OCT. 28 --8:30
.4 ..
HILL AUITORIU

(Continued, from Page 2)
HOUSE DIRECTORS AND SO-
CIAL CHAIRMEN are reminded that
requests for social events must be
filed in the Office of the Dean of
Students not later than the Monday
before the event for which approval
is requested. It should be accompan-
ied by written acceptance from two
sets of APPROVED CHAPERONS
and, in the case of fraternities and
sororities, by approval from the fi-
nancial adviser. APPROVED CHAP-
ERONS may be: 1) parents of ac-
tive members or pledges, 2) profes-
sors, associate professors, or assistant
professors, or 3) couples already ap-
proved by the Committee on Student
Affairs. A list of the third group is
available at the OFFICE OF THE
DEAN OF STUDENTS.
SENIORS IN AERONAUTICAL
AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING:
The Douglas Aircraft Company,
Inc. has established a scholarship of
$500 to be used during the current
school year. The scholarship will be
awarded to a highly recommended
student in Aeronautical or Mechani-
cal Engineering who has completed
his Junior year at the University. Ap-
plications should be in letter form,
giving a brief statement of qualifi-
cations and experience in regard to
both scholastic work and any outside
experience they may have had. The
present draft classification and any
service record should be mentioned.
Senior Mechanicals will address their
letters of application to Prof. R.
S. Hawley, Rm. 221 W. Eng. Bldg.,
senior Aeronauticals will send their
applications to Prof. E. W. Con-
lon, B-47 E. Eng. Bldg. Applications
will be received up to Oct. 9.
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

STUDENTS: There is available one
$500 Robert L. Perry Memorial Fel-
lowship to students in Aeronautical
Engineering who are in need of fi-
nancial assistance and who show
definite promise in this field.
In the selection of a candidate pref-
erence will be given to veteran
pilots. Applications should be in
letter form, giving a statement of
services in the armed forces, and ad-
dressed to Prof. E. W. Conlon,
B-47 E. Eng. Bldg. Applications will
be received up to Oct. 5.
SCHOLARSHIP OPEN TO SEN-
IOR MECHANICAL, AERONAUTI-
CAL AND ELECTRICAL ENGI-
NEERING STUDENTS: Consolidated
Vultee Aircraft corporation has es-
tablished an annual scholarship of
$250 which is available to students
who are in their Junior year in the
above fields of engineering and who
are highly recommended by their
faculty Scholarship Committee. The
student will be employed by the Com-
pany the first semester after the
award. Application forms for this
scholarship may be obtained in the
Aeronautical Eng. Office.
CONSOLIDATED VULTEE GRAD-
UATE FELLOWSHIP: The Consoli-
dated Vultee Aircraft Corporation has
established two annual Graduate Fel-
lowships -of $750 each, available to
graduates of accredited engineering,
metallurgy, physics or mathematics
schools who are highly recommended
by their faculty Scholarship Com-
mittee, for graduate study -and re-
search in the fields included in aero-
nautical engineering. The students
will be employed by the Company
the first summer after the awards.
Applications available in Aero. Eng.
Office.
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

i

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wmmml

JUNIORS, SENIORS AND GRADU-
ATES: Four Frank P. Sheehan schol-
arships are available. The selection of
candidates for these scholarships is
made very largely on the basis of
scholastic standing. Applicants
should address letters to Prof.
E. W. Conlon, B-47 E. Eng.
Bldg. giving a brief statement of
their qualifications and experience
(Continued on Page 4)
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Be sure to get The Chicago Sun
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