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January 19, 1947 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

" .

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4

AME OLD STORY:
Financial Problems ContLin ne
To Harry State Legislature

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

By FRANCES PAINE
Financial dilemmas are nothing
new to the Michigan state legis-
lature.
The problems facing the pres-
ent session, as a result of the di-
version of one-sixth of sales tax
proceeds for public education, re-
call the struggle which took place
in Michigan 100 years ago to guar-
antee funds for the schools, ac-
cording to Claude R. Tharp, re-
search associate in the Univer'-
sity's Bureau of Government.
Veterans May
Study Abroad
Under GI Bill
Fulbtight Act Offers
Additional Assistance
Veterans who want to study
abroad may get help under the
Fulbright Act to supplement ben-
efits received from the GI Bill of
Rights, a State Department offi-
cial told the Daily yesterday.
Oliver J. Caldwell, acting as-
sistant chief of the Division of
International Exchange of. Per-
sons, said that this additional as-
sistance may take the form of
payment of transportation, tui-
tion, maintenance and "other ex-
penses incident to scholastic ac-
tivities."
Under provisions of the Ful-
bright Act, Public Law No. 584,
the State Department is author-
ized to utilize foreign currencies
and credit acquired through the
sale of surplus property abroad
for programs of student exchange.
Since this 'exchange must be
financed with foreign currencies,
travel expenss of students to
foreign countries can be paid on-
ly where currencies can be made
available.
Veterans of both world wars
will be given preference and the
selection in this country will be
made from students in all parts of
the United States, according to a
State Department circular.
It is anticipated that agreements
for administering the program will
be concluded in time to permit a
limited selection of students for
the academic year 1947-48.
Persons interested in. the pro-
gram are advised to communicate
with Dr. Walter C. Eells, Chief,
Foreign Education Division, Vet-
erans Administration, Washing-
ton, 25, D. C.
* *
Q.xford Offers
Summer Plan
A summer school for American
and other "overseas" students ex-
tending from July 2 to Aug. 13,
will be offered by the University
of Oxford, England, the Oxford
Delegacy for Extra-Mural Studies
announced.
The school is designed for men
and women who hold a B.A. de-
gree with a major in cultural sub-
jects but undergraduates with
special qualifications will be con-
sidered. Men and women will be
accepted in approximately equal
numbeis.
Approval has been granted for
veterans to attend the school us-
ing benefits of the G. L Bill.
The curriculum will be based on
a lecture course, "European Civ-
ilization in the 20th Century,"
and students will also attend lec-
tures and seminars in "Litera-
ture in the 20th Century," De-
veopments in Contemporary Phil-
osophy" or "The Political and
"EconomicB~ackgrounct."

Iowever, in the early history
of the state it was the legislature
which created financial embar-
rassment, but the more recent
chaotic conditions must be laid at
the doorstep of the electorate it-
self," Tharp said.
Michigan was bankrupt in 1846
following an orgy of speculation
in railroad building and the issu-
ance of notes which had been dis-
credited by the public. The state
legislature solved its problem by
borrowing from the public schools
the funds which had been created
by the sale of federal land set
aside for educational purposes by
the Northwest Ordinance of 1787,
and by selling the railroads, which
were then state-owned.
Railroads Taxed
Auditor-General Bell recom-
mended to the Legislature of 1847
that the interest on the state's
loan from the school land fund be
paid by taxing the railroads, now
privately owned. This was only
proper since the funds borrowed
werenused to finance the railroads
when they were state-owned,
Tharp pointed out.
Use of railroad taxes for public
education was authorized by the
legislature, and a provision requir-
ing it was incorporated into the
Constitution of 1850. This provi-
sion was continued in the Consti-
tution of 1908.
Taxes Continued
Although the Supreme Court de-
clared the state's debt to the
schools null in 1881, use of certain
specific taxes for educational pur-
poses has been continued to the
present, and these taxes have con-
stituted a large proportion of state
aid to the schools.
"Thus after the lapse of a cen-
tury, the partisans of education
have sought to guarantee its finan-
cial support by placing in the fun-
damental law of the state a pro-
vision for earmarking another of
the specific taxes for use of the
public schools," Tharp said.
Problem Not New
"The present effort of the legis-
lature to find means of financing
the $270,000,000 bond issue for a
veterans' bonus reminds us that
the problem of paying for debts
growing out of war is not new to
Michigan," Tharp said.
The legislature made its first
use of credit in 1838 to finance a
threatened war with the state of
Ohio over a boundary dispute.
This was the occasion for calling
two extra conventions, three ses-
sions of the legislature and an
army of 1,300 men to guard the
southern border.,
'Revelry in Credit'
The state's bankruptcy in 1846,
resulting from what Tharp called
"revelry in credit," led to consti-
tutional safeguards against the is-
suing of unmanageable debts.
Thus, a century later it was neces-
sary to amend the state constitu-
tion to authorize the issuance of
the $270,000,000 bond issue for the
veterans' bonus.
"The same electorate that au-
thorized the divergence by the
sales tax amendment of large por-
tions of the revenue upon which
the state was relying, authorized
the issuance of the bonus bonds,"
Tharp pointed out.
Senior Dues Must Be
Paid To Insure Listing
Dues collection for second se-
mester seniors is now underway
and must be paid promptly by
each prospective graduate in ord-
er to insure the listing of his name
on the graduation list, Joan Wilk,
senior class treasurer, said yester-
day.
Amounting to $1, the dues are
to be sent to Barbara Raymer,
finance chairman, at 407 N. In-
galls.

MID-WESTERN REGIONAL CHAIRMAN-idwestern Regional
chairman of the Chicago Student Conference are shown here in
meeting. From left to right they are: Paul Kirk, DePaul Univer-
sity; Patricia Groom, Maryvile College; John P. hunter, Univer-
sity of Wisconsin; Eugene Berman, University of Nebraska; TER-
RELL WHITSITT, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN; Leo Rattay,
Western Reserve University. Whitsitt is vice-president of the
Michigan Regional Committee.
Japanese Linguists Are Sought

(Continued from Page 1)
tions outside of Rm. 104 W. Engine
Bldg.
English 228-Psychology and
Analysis of Literature: In the
Time Schedule, the hour and room
assignment is wrong on page 16.
The assignment under Psychology
on page 36 is correct.
Psychology 31: The room as-
signments for the final examina-
tion which were announced in dis-
cussion section have been posted
on the departmental bulletin
board across from room 2127 NS.
Concerts
The Budapest Quartet, Josef
Roismann and Edgar Ortenberg,
violinists; Boris Kroyt, viola; and
Mischa Schneider, violoncello, will
participate in the Seventh An-
nual Chamber Music Festival in
three concerts in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall in programs as follows:
Friday, January 24, 8:30 p.m.:
Mozart Quartet in A major; Hin-
demith Quartet in B-flat; and
Beethoven Quartet in E-minor.
Saturday, January 25, 2:30 p.m.:
Haydn Quartet in C major; Debus-
sy Quartet in G minor; and Sme-
tana Quartet in E-minor.
Saturday, January 25, 8:30 p.m.:
Beethoven Quartet in D major,
Prokofioff Quartet No. 2; and
Brahms Quartet in B-flat major.
A very limited number of tickets
are still available at the offices of
the University Musical Society in
Burton Memorial Tower. One hour
before each performance tickets
will be on sale in the lobby of the
Rackham Building.
Organ. Recital: Richard Ross.
guest organist, will be heard in
the first recital of the semester,
at 8:30 Wednesday evening, Jan-
uary 22, in Hill Auditorium. Mr.
Ross is a faculty member of Pea-
body Conservatory of Music, Bal-
timor. Program: compositions
by Bach, Handel, Brhams, Franck,

Dupre,
Vierne,
public.

Purvis, Bingham
and will be open to

Men with a basic knowledge of
Japanese are urgently needed by
the Army to take care of the criti-
cal shortage of linguists in the Pa-
cific area, according to M/Sgt.
George Danneffel.
Qualified men may enroll in the
Army Military Intelligence Serv-
ice Language School to be trained
in oral and written Japanese.

and
the

Rapid promotions are guaranteed
to those who successfully complete
the courses.
Veterans may re-enlist with the
rank of Sergeant Technicians or
discharge grade (whichever is
higher), and will be sent immedi-
ately to Presidio, Calif., to Mili-
tary Intelligence Language School.

Exhibitions
The Museum of Art presents
The New Spirit (the art of Le
Corbusier), and Art of the Mid-
dle Ages, in the galleries of Alum-
ni Memorial Hall, current through
January 26. Week days, except
Monday, 10-12 and 2-5; Wednes-
day evenings 7-9; Sundays, 2-5.
The public is cordially invited.
Events Today
Veterans Concert Orchestra Re-
hearsal: 3 p.m., West Lodge.
Thomas E. Wilson, Conductor.
Coming Events
Michigan Chapter AAUP: 6:15
p.m., Wed., Jan. 22, Union Cafe-
teria. Dr. James P. Adams, Provost
of the University, will speak on
"Academic Administration, a dis-
cussion of principles and their ap-
plication."
American Folk and Ballad Sing-
ers, sponsored by AVC: 8:15 p.m.,
Tues., Feb. 11, Rackham Hall.
Tickets are now on sale at the Un-
ion, the League, and bookstores.
The Christian Science OrganI-
zation will meet January 21 but
not January 28 or February 4. The
next meeting after January 21 will
be held at 7:30 p.m., Tues., Feb. 11,
Upper Room, Lane Hall.
Churches
First Presbyterian Church:
10:00 a.m.: Reception of new
members, Lewis Parlor. 10:45
a.m.: Anniversary Communion
Service. Morning Worship. Ser-
mon Topic: "At-on-ment," by
Dr. Lemon. 5:00 p.m.: Westmin-
ster Guild. Professor Sam Dean,
School of Engineering at Yen-
ching, China, will speak. Supper
will follow meeting.

First. Congregational Church:
10:45 a.m.: Dr. Parr subject is
"Building In Silence".
6:00 p.m.: Student Guild. Me-
morial Christian Church. Sup-
per and Program.
First Baptist Church:
C. H. Loucks, Minister
10:00 a.m.: Student Class of the
Church School meet in guild house
to discuss "Forgiveness and Sal-
vation," lead by Mr. Loucks.
11:00 a.m.: Sermon topic "Cre-
ative Faith".
6 to 8 p.m.: Roger Williams
Guild meet in guild house. Will
Erickson will talk on "My Reac-
tion to Indian Missions."
University Lutheran Chapel:
9:45 and 11 a.m., Worship Serv-
ice, with the pastor preaching on
the subject, "Invite Jesus to Your
Marriage!"
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club: regular supper meet-
ing,, 5:15 p.m. at the Center.
Lutheran Student Association:
5:30 p.m., Zion Lutheran Par-
ish Hall. A short devotional
service will follow the supper hour.
Bible hour~ will be held as usual
at the Center at 9:15 but the
Church History Class wil not meet
this Tuesday.
Zion Lutheran Church and
Trinity Lutheran Church will
have their regular morning wor-
ship services at 10:30 a.m.

F'renehYou
Five years ago Ple rya
and his friends were painti
Cross of Lorraine all over
blanca and tossing home.
bombs into German occupati
fices in French Morocco,
Now, at the age of 21, Ra3
one of several students se
by the French government to
engineering in the United
in preparation for the recon
tion of France, is enterin
senior year in mechanical
neering at the University.
Raynaudtarrived in thest
States in time to start stu
here the summer term of 19
French Government Plan
Originally the French gc
ment agreed to provide a fou
education course in the i
States for the prospective
neers, with the stipulation
graduates would work five
for the French government a
of the reconstruction progr
After a year of school, ho
the regular flow of checks c
and Raynaud received notic
his scholarship had been d
tinued. "At first I thought
a change in policy by the nev
ernment,." he says, "but evi(
it is due to lack of funds to
on the program."
Since then the immediate :
has been just one big qu
mark for Raynaud. He wa
to obtain a tuition scholarsh
der the Wagner Fund for' F
Students. By working at a
ternity house for his meals ai
ing on duty at the Interna
Center three times a week, I
been able to make both ends
so far. During the summi
worked in the metal processi
partment and supplemented l
come during the past ter
teaching French classes.
Born in France, Raynaud :
with his family to Morocco
he received all his schoolin
cluding a year and a half o:
versity credits before leavir
country. He became we
quainted with Americans anc
customs after the Allied lar
in Morocco, though he di
dream at the time that hi;
you in the States" might son
come true.
Probably their most ing
achievement was obtainin
key to the office of the Vich
gion, a group formed to c
the underground, and literall
ering the office with Free .
posters and slogans.

FIRST SEMESTER EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
January 20-31, 1947
NOTE: For courses having both lecture: and quizzes, the time of
exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of the
first quiz period. Certain courses will be examined at special per-
iods as noted below the regular schedule. 12 o'clock classes,
5 o'clock classes, and other "irregular" classes may use any
of the periods marked * provided there is no conflict with the reg-
ular printed schedule. To avoid misunderstandings and errors,
each student should receive notification from his instructor of the
time and place of his examination. In the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts no date of examination may be changed
without the consent of the Examination Committee.

First Church of Christ Scientist:
409 S. Division St.
Sunday .morning service a
10:30. Subject, "Life".
Sunday School at 11:45.
Wednesday evening service a
8 p.m.

t
A

Time of Exercise
Monday at 8
" at 9
" at10
" at 11
" at2.
" at 3
" at 4

Time of Examination

, ..........................

Fri.,
Mon.,
Mon.,
Wed.,
Sat.,
Tues.,
Fri.,
Wed.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

24,
27,
20,
22,
25
28,
31
29,

...........................

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

Universitiy of Michigan
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
January 20 to January 31, 1947
Note: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time of
exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of the
first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the ex-
amination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to such
work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted be-
low the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned
examination periods must be reported for adjustment. See bulle-
tin board outside of Room 3223 East Engineering Building between
January 6 and January 11 for instruction. To avoid misunderstand-
ings and errors, each student should receive notification from his
instructor of the time and place of his appearance in each course
during the period January 20 to January 31.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee.

First Unitarian Church:
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 a.m.: Unitarian-Friends'
Church School.
10:00 a.m.: Adult Study Group.
Mr. Don G. Campbell's discussion
on Northrup's "Meeting of East
and West."
11:00 a.m.: Service of Worship.
Rev. Edward H. Redman preach-
ing on "Belief in Man-Criticism
and Affirmation."
There will be no meeting of the
Unitarian Student Group this
week.
Friends; 4 p.m., 3d floor, First
Presbyterian Church. At the close
of the meeting for worship there
will be a talk by Dr. Stephen Yang
on "Religion of the Chinese Peo-
ple." Visitors are invited to at-
tend and take part iri the discus-
sion. There will be no meeting
of Young Friends.

Tuesday at 8 ................. .........Thurs., Jan. 30,
" at 9 ........................... Tues., Jan. 28,
"5 at 10.............. ............Tues., Jan. 21,
" at 11 .......................... ..Thurs., Jan. '23,
"5 at 1 ............................. Fri., Jan. 31,
"5 at 2 ............................Thurs., Jan. 30,
"5 at 3 ..................... ..... Wed., Jan. 22,
"5 at 4 ............................ Fri., Jan. 24,
Evening classes ..........................,Mon., Jan. 27,
SPECIAL PERIODS

For Really Good Food

Ec. 51, 52, 53, 54, 101, 153 ..........
History 11, Lecture Group 2 ........ .
Botany 1 )
Zoology 1 ) ......................
Speech 35 )
Chemistry 55 )
English 1, 2 ) ...................
Russian 31 )
French 1, 2, 11, 31, 32,)
61, 62, 91, 92, 93, 153)
Speech 31, 32 )
Psychology 31 ...................
Soc. 51, 54.......................
German 1, 2, 31, 32)
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 ) .............. .
Chem. 3, 4, 5, 5e, 41 ................
Pol. Sci. 1, 2, 51 ....................

*Mon., Jan. 20,

2-5

.Mon., Jan. 20, 2-5
..... .'Tues., Jan. 21, 2-5
.....*Wed., Jan. 22, 2-5

come to the

*Thurs., Jan. 23,

.Fri., Jan.
......Fri., Jan.

24,
24,
25,
27,
29,

2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

Time
(
(
Monday (
(
(
(
(
(
(
(
Tuesday (
(
(
(
(

*Sat.,
. Mon.,
. Wed.,

of Exercise
at 8
at 9
at 10
at 11
at 1
at 2
at 3
at 4

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
4

Time of Examination
Fri., Jan. 24.............
Mon., Jan. 27..........
Mon., Jan. 20..........
W ed., Jan. 22 ...........
Sat., Jan. 25 ............
Tues., Jan. 28 ............
Fri., Jan. 31 ............
Wed., Jan. 29, ..........
Thurs., Jan. 30 ..........
Tues., Jan. 28.........
Tues., Jan. 21.........
Thurs., Jan. 23 ..........
Fri., Jan., 31 ..........
Thurs., Jan. 30 ..........
W ed., Jan. 22 ...........
Fri., Jan. 24 ............
Mon., Jan. 27 ............
*Mon., Jan. 20............
' Tues., Jan. 21.........
*Wed., Jan. 22 ..........
nct *Thurs., Jan. 23..........
"'Fri., Jan. 24 ...........
"'Sat, Jan. 25 ............
*Mon., Jan. 27 ..........
*Wed., Jan. 29 ............
'Wed., Jan. 29 ...........

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5

11:00 A.M.-2:00 P.M.

MASONIC TEMPLE CAFETERIA
Located in the basement of the Masonic Temple
327 South Fourth Avenue
Meals served Monday through Saturday

5:00 P.M.-7:00 P.M.

,1

School of Business Administration
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Forestry and Conservation
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Music: Individual Instruction in Applied Music
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit
in any unit of the University. For time and place of examinations,
see bulletin board at the School of Music.
School of Public Health
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.

Evening classes
Ec. 53, 54, 153; Draw 1
M.P. 2, 3, 4
Eng. 11, C.E. 21
Draw. 2; Phys. 46; E.E. 5, Fre]
M.E. 3; Phys. 45
E.M. 1, 2, 6; Span.; German
Chem. 3, 4, 5E; Surv. 1, 4
Draw. 3
Ch-Met. 1

NEW STYLES FIRST

AT WIL D'S

*This may also be used as an irregular period, provided there is no
conflict with the regular printed schedule above.

The Corduroy Sport Coat
you want!
It's great to be able to offer you these

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

r Lr jLf-L{1-LJ-Lf ri1 F1TF F l FL~LFFLhFLF
71 LL
ENCORE
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9 C and up

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We're
Not as

FICTION

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as glad about it as you will be.

many as we want but your size will be
here if you buy early.

REFERENCE TITLES

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