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October 01, 1946 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TEMEE

,,

Crisler Likes
'M'Showing
Deelares Wolverine
Passing Attack Good
Coach "Fritz" Crisler, at his usual
Monday quarter-back session yes-
terday, declared he was very pleased
with the general showing of his Wol-
verine eleven in their initial 1946
grid battle, despite some obvious
rough spots common to opening day
tilts.
He pointed out that the line
wasn't boxing in Ben Raimondi
and' the other Hoosier aerialists
properly in the early part of the
game, but after the half-time rest
they came back to rush the passers
into hurried and inaccurate tosses.
"Speaking of passing," Crisler
commented, "I thought ours were
pretty accurate." Two of Michigan's
scores were achieved by way of the
air-lanes. The first touchdown of
the game came on a toss from half-
back Gene Derricotte to Paul White
on the five-yard line, and end Len-
nie Ford made a one-handed spear
of Pete Elliott's end-zone pass in
the closing quarter.
Crisler presented two explana-
tions for hisrather uninhibited use
of substitutes throughout the game.
Primarily, he declared, he wanted to
get a line on as many of his players
as passible, and even sent in several
combinations that he hadn't plan-
ned upon using. In the second place,
it was hot. Nothing is so conducive
to substitutions as an 80-degree
afternoon.
As to the coming week's work,
the- Michigan mentor said he
plans to concentrate on funda-
menitals in preparation for the
Saturday encounter with an un-
predictable Iowa eleven. "I'd al-
ways figured on a tough game
with the Hawkeyes," Crisler nod-
ded;"and after last week-end I'm
more positive than ever."
Iowa furnished the Western Con-
ference circle with a bit of a sur-
prse-when they knocked off Pur-
due last Saturday. The Boilermak-
ers have been touted in pre-season
talk as a fairly strong outfit with
boys 'like Bob DeMoss and Ed Cody
aroupd, and when the Hawks pull
a 16-0 upset it's evident that
Coach Eddie Anderson has master-
mined another surprise-package.

Initial I-M
Play Slated
For Today
By BILL JENNETT
What will be potentially the largest
intramural sports program in Michi-
gan's history will start today when
fraternity and residence hall teams
open their year's schedules with
speedball and touch football.
Since only freshmen are required
to attend PEM classes this year; in-
tramurals will furnish men students
their only chance to participate in
organized sports outside of varsity
athletics. There is a place for every
man on campus in this expanded
program.
Thirty-seven different sports will
be on the calendar during the year,
including both team and individual
activities, covering the whole field of
popular sports from table tennis to
boxing.
Program Offers Six Divisions
Most participants will enter one of
the six main divisions: the fraternity
division; the residence halls division,
including professional fraternities;
the all-campus division for individual
sports; the independent teams divi-
sion; and the faculty division.
Besides these there are the Inter-
national Center I.M. program, the
large independent program at Willow
Village, and the instruction division,
for those wishing instruction in vari-
ous sports. The instructors are selec-
ted from outstanding student players
and members of the intramural staff.
Representatives Plan Schedules
Organization, of the program got
underway a week ago when repre-
sentatives of 28 social fraternities
and four professional fraternities met
at the Sports Building and under the
direction of Mr. Earl Riskey drew up
leagues and schedules for the six
week speedball competition.
Speedball, a combination of soccer,
football and basketball, originated at
the University of Michigan, and is
considered a much more active and
wide-open game than touch football,
It has been played with considerable
success in the past and the competi-
tion this year promises to be excep-
tionally strong. Chi Phi is they de-
fending champion.
Dorms Organize Touch Football
Residence halls are also organizing
their touch football schedules and' all
independents are urged to register at
the Sports Building so that they also

Cards Face Bums in Play-off Opener Today

SECOND
GUESSuNt

0 . .

By CLARK BAKER
Daily Sports Editor

It isn't often that we pause to quote a colleague in the newspaper field
but an item datelined, "ANN ARBOR, Sept. 28," was spotted by one of our
eagle-eyed staff members reposing in the sports section of Sunday's Chi-
cago Sun. It was too much to let pass yithout some comment.
Said article is headlined, "Michigan Students Get Choice Seats."
We looked again, but it wasn't a mirage, so we read on learning that
'students, faculty, season ticket holders and visiting team groups will
occupy 27 of the 44 sectios in the University of Michigan football stad-
ium this fall." We couldn't disagree with that.
The article continued, "Because one third of the stadium seats only
are located between the goal posts, practically all of the individual game
seats will be located in the corner and end sections since students and sea-
son-ticket purchasers have preferential locations." If the students we know
received "preferential locations," then individual game purchasers must
be buying up tree space adjoining the stadium fence.
Technically speaking, the story is correct. Some students, 816 to
be exact, out of some 18,000 do occupy so-called "preferential loca-
tions." Who cares about the other 17,000? After all, they're only the
classmates of the men on the field, the people who cheer the team on
to victory, the 17,000 who'll be in the stadium whether the opponent
is Podunk Normal or Army, and who'll stick with the team in defeat
as well as victory.
It wasn't so many years ago that Michigan teams weren't winning.
Where were all these "loyal alumni" then, the persons who gobbled up all
the best seats last spring because it looked like Coach Fritz Crisler had a
winner? The 1934 Wolverines played five home games, winning only one.
The loyal alumni stayed away in force. Only 122,526 fans saw the five con-
tests. Nor did the Wolverine home attendance reach 200,000 for any of
the other three losing seasons, 1935-37.
Maybe that's why we dislike seeing stories like the above appearing
in out-of-town papers. It gives the impression that the Michigan stu-
dent body is appreciated when in reality the athletic administration
must have groaned aloud at an increase in student enrollment which
cost it some seven or eight thousand more paid admissions.
The 1946 ticket controversy has been blanketed by some neat man-
uevering which has attempted to clear the athletic administration of all
blame for student seating and pin the donkey's tail on the lower classmen.
This is so obviously camouflage that it needs no comment.
It is unfortunate that a student outbreak against ticket distribu-
tion can only occur after all the choice seats' have been distributed.
The good seats were assigned to those who had the money last August.
Student seats weren't given out until the last of September. By this
time it is obviously too late to do anything about it.
We can only hope that for the six remaining games on the schedule
the student body will get as good a break as it did Saturday when all the

New Louis, Zale
Bouts Planned;
Frisch Resigns
Zale To Face Rock Again
NEW YORK, Sept. 30.-(P)-A re-
match of one of the great fights of
fistic history-the middleweight title
bout between champion Tony Zale
and challenger Rocky Graziano-was
signed today for March 21 in Madi-
son Square Garden, with the house
scaled to produce the greatest indoor
gate on record.
** *
Winner May Meet Joe
NEW YORK, Sept. 30.-VP)-The
campaign to provide a 1947 heavy-
weight challenger to be served up to
Joe Louis got under way today with
the signing of Jersey Joe Walcott and
Elmer (The Violent) Ray for a ten-
round bout in Madison Square Gar-
den November 15.
Tigers Sign New Catcher
DETROIT, Sept. 30.-(.P)-George
M. Trautman, executive vice-presi-
dent of the Detroit Tigers, today an-
nounced the acquisition of William
"Red" Mathis, 23-year-old catcher,
from the Tigers' Atlanta, Ga., farm
club.
The big right-hander, who was dis-
charged from service at the start of
this season, will report in the spring.
He batted .318 during the past season
with Charleston, S.C., of the Sally
League, another .Tiger club, Traut-
man said.
Herman Named Manager
PITTSBURGH, Sept. 30-P)-Billy
Herman, second baseman par excel-
lence of the Boston Braves who has
batted in the vicinity of .305 over his
15 major league years, today became
the 20th manager of the Pittsburgh
Pirates.
Herman succeeds Frankie Frisch,
who resigned Saturday after a seven-
year tenure.

By The Associated Press
ST. LOUIS, Sept. 30-Those un-
predictable, unreliable, untamed
Brooklyn Dodgers meet the Cardi-
nals tomorrow at Sportsman's Park
in the first of a three-game play-off
to decide which of the two National
League clubs must stand up and take
it, unflinchingly, from the Boston
Red Sox in the World Series.
Except for the monetary reward,
the prospect is not pleasant. The
winner is sure to be a weary, beaten-
down crew when it finally comes to
grips with the American Leaguers
about a week from today. But that
will make the series starting tomor-
row none thehless bitter, none the
less hard-fought.
Cards Strong Favorites
The odds tonight, stated by one of
the country's top betting commis-
sioners, James J. Carroll, made the
slump-ridden Cardinals strong fav-
orites to win the play-off-first in
the history of organized baseball. A
$20 bet placed on the Red Birds
would win only $13, while a $10 wa-
ger on the Brooks would return $13.
The Cardinals, who blew a chance
to to sew up the flag late yesterday
when they were beaten by the Chi-
cago Cubs in their final tussle, went
through a small workout -today.
Manager Eddie Dyer said his start-
ing pitcher tomorrow would be ei-

ther Howie Pollet, a left-hander of
recently dubious ability, or Murray
Dickson, a righthander.
Dodgers Miss Workout
The Brooklyns, who gained a re-
prieve after being shut out in their
finalagainst the Boston Braves yes-
terday at Ebbets Field, spent last
night and most of today on the cars.
They got in here too late to exercise,
but their manager, Lippy Leo Duro-
cher, left no doubt that they would
be ready when the bell rings at 1:30
CST tomorrow.
Leo said he leaned strongly to-
ward Ralph Branca, a rookie right-
hander, as his starter in the flirst
game of the play-off. Branca blank-
ed the Cards 5-0 with three hits the
last time he faced them in Brooklyn.
Durocher's Boys Unpredictable
Taken on almost any sound basis
of reasoning, the Cards probably
should win the play-off and play the
Red Sox on the Series. The only
draw-back to such a conclusion is
that it never is quite safe to expect
the Dodgers to do anything either
sound or basic.
There isn't a single sane explana-
tion of the fact that they have fin-
ished in a tie for the top. Man for
man, they simply do not possess
the "class" players who adorn the
St. Louis roster.

Card Hurler Undecided;
Dodgers Favor Blanca

FRATERNITIES - SORORITIES -DORMS
for After-the-Game Parties
v by
THE CAMPUS JAZZ GROUP
Tom McNalI - 115 WinchelI House - Phone 2.4401

I

IC

can be grouped into teams in their

division.

GET HEP
O REFEREE
ARM
SIGNALS ~_

.......... --- -------

W HA T T O
W IT H W
-AND W

WEAR f
'HEN
WH AT'S
9 0''' H E R
NUMBER?

' f

Put The Tools Away.f
and be present
at the '

action took place around the north
noses of 17,000, Michigan students.

end of the stadium, right under the

\

WHAT
SIZE
SSHOE
DO I
WEAR?

WHO
HOLDS
T H AT
RECI)RD?

IVI,, Club Meets
"M" Club, the campus organization
for all varsity letter-winners now at-
tending the University, swings into
its fall program tomorrow with an
all-important meeting at 7:15 p.m. in
the Union, at which Homer Heath,
treasurer of the national "M" Club,
and Vic Heyliger, Wolverine hockey
coach, will be the princ4.pal speakers.
At this time, new officers will be
elected for the coming year, and the
club's activities and policies for the
future will be discussed. Such topics
as the annual-fall dance, club-spon-
There will be an important
meeting of the sports staff includ-
ing tryouts at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow
afternoon in the Student Publica-
tions Building. All members should
be present.

sored swing concerts, and "M"-win-
ners' activities at the future pep ral-
lies will be on the agenda.
Elmer Swanson, Wolverine baseball
and track star who is the president,
urges all letter-winners now on cam-
pus to attend, regardless of when
they won their awards.
Golf Tourney
Match play in the annual True-
blood Golf Tournament gets un-
der way this week, with all first
round scores due by next Sunday,
October 6.
Bruce Mac Millan led the quali-
fiers with a 73, followed by Mort
Cohn and B. W. Gilpin with 75's.
Entrants are to call 9308 for their
pairings and time schedule.
..In the special tourney being held
for varsity men, Bill Ludolph leads
the field with a 74.

UNION STAFF BANQUET

TOMORROW

NIGHT

6:30 P.M.

SCHEDULES!
SCORES!
COACHES!
KNOW
YOUR
GREEK WHO
AT A
PEEK! PAYS WHO
PEE~iAND HOW MUCH

WHO
DID
IT?

Phone the Union Student Offices;

"I Arm Coming!"

i

__ __ __ _ __ __ __ _ __ __ F'

W H T-0 '
COtOR
TIE

;

LATEST DISPWTCH FROM THE FRONT I
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