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October 01, 1946 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-01

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1946

m

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Irate Students
Change Cheer
Special 'To 1Ithe Daily
ANN ARBOR, Sept. 30.-Con-
flicting reports concerning the
quality of the seats occupied by

Mt4 RKHAM ADVISES:
Beep Atomic Bomb Secret;
Stop Soviet Expansion Now

Publication in The Daily Official Bul-
letin is constructive notice to all mem-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent in typewritten
form to the office of the Assistant to the
President, Room 1021 Angell Hall, by 3:30
p.m. on the day preceding publication
(11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1
VOL. LVI No. 7
Notices
Telephone Number Change-Business
Office
Recently the switchboard has been
removed from the Business Office. If
you call 81 you will hear the "busy"
signal. Each employee of that office
has been assigned a station with an
individual number. To reach the
Business Office, please dial 4121 and
ask for the person or department de-
sired, or dial 696 and the proper sta-
tion number will be given to you.
Herbert G. Watkins,
Secretary
ALL MEN registered with the Stu-
dent Employment Bureau, are re-
quested to bring their record up to
date by adding their Fall Term sched-
ules, and also any changes of address.
THIS IS IMPORTANT.
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
BUREAU
Room 2 University Hall
FOOTBALL TICKETS
1. On Monday and Tuesday, Sep-
tember 30 and October 1, all students
with less than 60 hours credit who
hold student football tickets in Sec-
tions 24 through 28, inclusive, will
turn them in at booths in the lobby
of University Hall and the North
Lounge of the Union.. . Receipts will
be issued for tickets turned in. Tic-
kets must be surrendered, whether
obtained through fraud or error, but
the turn-in will be without preju-
dice and with no questions asked.
A student with 60 credit hours or
more who holds a seat in the above
sections adjacent to a seat which
must be surrendered by an under-
classman, and who wishes to con-
tinue sitting next to that underclass-
man, may present both ticket books,
together with proof of his class
standing at the same time and place.
An effort will be made to furnish
two adjacent seats in return in other
sections of the stadium.
2. On Wednesday and Thursday,
1000 HEADS WANTED!!
Be they round, square, flat
-for that Michigan "Crew-
Cut" at the
DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State & Michigan Theaters

October 2 and 3, students with 60 or
more credit hours who hold student
tickets in sections of the stadium
numbered 29 or higher may present
them, with proof of the student's
class standing, at the booths in Uni-
versity Hall and the Union. They will
then receive tickets in the preferred
sections turned 'in by underclassmen.
Each upperclassman must present his
own ticket, but groups appearing
with adjacent tickets will be given
adjacent tickets will be given adja-
adjacent tickets in the preferred sec-
tions as far as possible.
3. On Friday and Saturday (un-
til 12:00 noon), October 4 and 5, un-
derclassmen may present their re-
ceipts for ticket books in the proper
sections.
4. Upperclassmen desiring privi-
leges under 1 or 2 above will be re-

quired to present personal identifi-
cation bearing either the student's
picture or his signature in addition to
proof of class standing.
5. Names of all students exchang-
ing tickets will be taken, but only for
the purposes of clearing the records
of those students who are in the
wrong sections, and to prevent fur-
ther fraud. Underclassmen should
be particularly careful that their cor-
rect names are submitted at the time
of ticket exchange, as this will pro-
tect such students from the possi-
bility of disciplinary action.
6. During the week of October 7
a check of University records will be
made to determine whether any un-
derclassmen sitting in Sections 24.
through 28 have failed to submit
their tickets for exchange. Any
(Continued on Page 4)

Lecture..

CLASSIFIED ADVEI

WANTED TO RENT
WANTED: Apartment or furnished room.
My husband will be home from the Pa-
cific next week. Does anyone know of
a place to live while I finish school?
Call 2-5587. )28
WANTED
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A better
price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. )14
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Red wallet either at Parrot or
Daily office. Credentials important. Re-
ward. Call 5032. )58
WILL the student who took tan notebook
by mistake from my car Friday after-
noon please turn it in to Lost and
Found Dept. )59
LOST: Black leather case including Leica
camera. Lost at DelHi Island. Identi-
fication: A. D. Engstrom. Reward. Call
Rodi Olson, 2-2521. )34
WRIST WATCH, initials C.R.S., on back.
Lost on Willow Run bus Sept. 25. Re-
ward. Notify C. R. Stone, 1158 Ware Ct.,
Willow Run, or Michigan Daily. )23
LOST: Green felt folder containing dental
instruments. Urgently needed. Beverly
Barclay, phone 2-2591. )20,
LOST: Economics 51 Syllabue. Urgently
needed. Call Ann Maidanick, 2-5232, right
away. )5
LOST: Toy bulldog, Friday. Color: brindle,
one white foot. Answers to "Dopey." Re-
ward. Call 2-4988. )6
LOST: Near Metzger's, a chrome Ronson
cigarette lighter, engraved "Santon."
Please call 7695 or leave at 1333 Wash-
tenaw. Reward. )8
LADY'S GOLD WATCH and chain; dagger
pin - between Michigan Union and Sta-
Shows Continuous Daily
on this attraction
through supper hours.

International Bu
COrpo
is interested in obtainingj
least a high school educatio
tion of electric accountin
charge for the training and
receive good compensation
sonnel trained will be plac
area. Positions are also o
Interviews will be held at 3
Arbor, on Thursday, Oct. 3
of 9:30 A.M. to 1 P.M.a
Applicants should be betw
35 and must apply in pers
dium; initials M.F.G. on watch. Finder
please contact Theodore Birnkrant, 1400
National Bank Bldg., Detroit. Phone:
Cadillac 1800. Reward. )60
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Boy's bicycle in excellent con-
dition. Call Mrs. James, 4489. )47
SECOND HAND, cheap but good: 1) violin,
2) B. Guitar 3) Clarinet. Please phone
2-2521 Ext. 331, Dr. Wang. )30
SILVER blended racoon coat. (Ladies 14).
$350 value. Worn less than one season.
$250 or best offer. Call 4046 evenings. ) 21
MAN'S DESK. Solid wood. Compartment
for large typewriter. Call 2-2754. )11
FOR SALE: 1937 Plymouth; 4 dr; rebuilt
motor; heater. H. Bodwin, 1470 Swan-
sea, Willow Run.
FOR SALE: RCA Victor radio, $10. Call
Carol, 438 Mosher. )9
K & E Log Log Duplex Decitrig slide rule
with case, $15.00. Call Al Schall, 2-2330.
)13
MISCELLANEOUS
MIDWAY Bicycle shop, 322 E. Liberty. We
have rebuilt used bikes for sale. Your
bike can be expertly repaired also. )56
C. &'M. TRUCKING CO. Trunks, suitcases
and small move jobs Call 21721 for es-
timates. )2
TENNIS, BADMINTON, SQUASH racquets
restrung. Nylon job now will be just as
good next spring. Phone 2-7360, Dean
McClusky, 417 8th St. )4
HELP WANTED
FOUNTAIN HELP: Top pay. Evenings and
weekends. Apply in person to Witham
Drug. )32

University students at the Michi- The United States must stop Rus-
gan - Indiana football game still sia's "imperialistic" expansion now,
reverberate across the Michigan Reuben H. Markham, veteran foreign
campus. correspondent, declared in a lecture
Although a story in a Chicago here Sunday.
paper concerning the seating situ- Firm Policy
ation ran under the headline, "America should face the facts and
"Michigan Students Get Choice back a policy of firmness toward
Seats," this opinion was contra- Russia-with military might behind
dicted by students sitting in sec- it if necessary," Markham said.
tions 33, 34 and 35 The governments of all Balkan
When the Michigan cheerlead- 1 countries except Greece have been
ers, in the second quarter of the imposed by Russia and are kept in
game, went to lead the behind- power by the Red Army, he said, and
the-goal students, their efforts added:
met with terrific success, only the Autocratic Regime
cheer sounded like "WE WANT "The regimes promote what every
BETTER SEATS." The next cheer, conscientious American since 1776
a. "sky-rocket," fizzled out. has considered autocratic and reac-
tionary."
Giving a negative answer to the
question, "Does Russia's dominating
T ISIN GT influence in the Balkans foster pro-
gress?" Markham asserted that the
Balkan peoples enjoy none of the
rights of democratic peoples-free-
dom of religion, press, speech and
association; protection of political
kA1~ parties, family security and moral
siness Machines order; and the right to strike.
Movements Suppressed
ration In an empassioned description of
events which he witnessed as corre-
men and women with at spondent for the Christian Science
?n fr tainig i theopecr-Monitor, Markham declared that the
in for training in the operva peasant movements of the Balkans-
g machines. There is no "the highest personification of demo-
some persons selected will cracy in those countries"-have been
. suppressed" by the "communist-
during this period. Per, dominated governments."
:ed with companies in this He pictured the Soviet Union as
en for trained operators. "crusading for a dominant position in
Mpen Sthe world" but "not necessarily for
07 South Fifth Street, Ann control of the world."
, 1946, between the hours He compared America's role in the
and 2 P.M. to 4:30 P.M. Balkans to its role in Czechoslovakia
in 1939 with the statement: "Events
veen the ages of 18 and proved that Czechoslovakia was our
on. concern."
"We must say that Russia can go
no farther and must insist upon lib-
FOUNTAIN HELP: Girl or young lady to eration of the people outside her bor-
work at soda fountain. Full time or ders," he asserted.
mornings. No evenings or Sundays.
Swift's Drug Store, 340 S. State St.,
Phone 3534. ___ 39 Law Review2/'
WANTED: Girls for commercial photo fin-
ishing plant. Automatic printers, no ex-o
perience necessary. Apply Miss Green 4 ChoosestStaff
to 5 p.m. Ivory Photo 1030 E. Univerl-o
sity Ave.'4 Elections of students to the upper

Interview. ..
"Possession" of military might by
the United States with the atomic,
bomb kept secret is the answer to
Russian expansion in the Balkans,
Reuben H. Markham told The Daily
Sunday.
Declaring that "possession of force
does not mean that we will have to
use force," Markham pointed out that
the threat of force by the Congress;
of Berlin in 1878 stopped Russia's
westward expansion to the Aegean
Sea.
Avert War
Questioned whether he agreed with
former Secretary of Commerce Henry
Wallace that war with Russia must
be averted at all costs, Markham re-
plied:
"No nation on earth can ever take
that attitude and remain free and
independent."
Questioned as to his stand on Wal-
lace's statement that Russia's sphere
of influence in the Balkans is simi-
lar to the United States' sphere of
influence in Latin America, Mark-
ham said:
Grave Error
"If anyone accuses us of doing to
any neighbor what Russia has done
to her neighbors, he makes a very
grave error."
Questioned concerning the appar-
ents inconsistency between Russianr
"domination" of other countries and
Stalin's repudiation of Trotsky's
theory of "continuing revolution," he
declared:
"Change of Mind"
"Russia has undergone a 'change
of mind'-from nationalism to inter-
nationalism. Stalin is bringing Rus-
sian nationalism .to a climax. He has
reconquered all the territories of im-
perial Russia and continues to push on
all borders. He is trying to revitalize
his nationalism through imperial
means."
Markham declared himself com-
pletely opposed to the separate
spheres of influence idea because
"once a sphere of influence is estab-
islhed, there is no stopping its ex-
pansion."
Asked whether he considered Stalin
to be as dangerous as Hitler, Mark-
ham replied:
"What Stalin is doing today re-
sembles what Hitler did-and the
results are the same."
He called. for international coop-
eration through the United Nations
as the "way out of this situation" but
reiterated that the Unied States must
remain armed.
Prof. Allen Will Address
Education Meeting Friday
Professor Shirley Allen of the
School of Forestry and Conserva-
tion will address the district meet-
ing of the Michigan Education As-
sociation in Escanaba Friday on the
subject, "What Every Citizen Should
Know About Conservation."

Navy . ..
(Continued from Page 1)
for strategic advantage at the Dar-
danelles.
The FDR herself showed up in a
Greek port on the eve-of an election
that interested Russia and the west-
ern powers.
A cruiser, with escort, was at hand
while Secretary of State Byrnes Was
insisting in Paris on a Trieste settle-
ment which was not pleasing to Rus-
sian-backed Yugoslavia.
The new statement of the fleet's
task coincides with the sharpening
of three issues in that area, topped by
U. S. determination to back Turkey
against new Russian demands on the
Dardanelles. The other are Greek
troubles with Soviet-supported neigh-
bors, and the continuing Yugoslav
pressure to dislodge the western
powers from Trieste,
Forrestal, in saying other carriers
will follow the FDR into the Mediter-
ranean, explained that the rotation
would give their personal training in
task Croup operation and equalize
the opportunity of the ships' compan-
ies to visit foreign countries.
Legal Society
Elects Officers
David Friedman, 47L, was elected
chancellor of Tau Epsilon Rho legal
fraternity in the chapter's first meet-
ing of the semester yesterday.
Other officers elected were Victor
Wertheimer, 48L, vice-chancellor;
David Loewenberg, 48L, master of the
rolls; Charles Levin, 47L, bursar,
George Brody, 47L, sergeant-at-arms;
and Marvin Koffman, 47L, parlia-
mentarian.
North Main Opposite Court House
Ends Tonight--
"CITY OF CONQEST"
plus-
"HEADIN' WEST"
- Starts Wednesday-
Claude Rains in
"STRANGE HOLIDAY"
plus
"RUSTLERS ROUNDUP"

.I

MICHIGAN

CUNNINGHAM'S
SODA FOUNTAIN
Women and girls needed for soda fountain
sales clerks. Day work. Good pay. Meals
and uniforms furnished.
Attention: students and students' wives;
we are in a position to arrange a schedule
to conform with your available hours--
either full or part time.
Apply at 226 S. Main St., Cunningham
Drug Co.)2V
WANTED: Philippine male student with
dining room experience for part-time &
banquet work. Phone 8656. )55
LIGHT ASSEMBLY WORK: Hours 8 to 5.
40 hour week. Pleasant surroundings.
Good working conditions. VOKAR CORP.
7300 Huron River Drive, Dexter, Mich.
)54
GOOD HOME-COOKED meals at the Ac-
acia Fraternity for waiting tables or
dishwashing. See Russ Buster at 1923
Geddes, or call 2-6674. )25
MUSICIANS: Piano and 1st trumpet for
dance orchestra, using all special ar-
rangements. Phone 7590. )10
WANTED: Porter for fraternity house. Sal-
ary plus room and board. Students in-
terested in part time work considered.
Reply Box 77, Michigan Daily. )12
MISCELLANEOUS
WISH TO CONTACT person commuting
daily by car from Detroit. Write Delmo
Della-Dora, Box 52, Michigan Daily. )15
Continuous from 1 P.M.
NOW

staff of the Michigan Law Review
Student Editorial Board were held
last Friday by the Law School faculty
for the first time since 1943.
John A. Huston has been appointed
Editor-in-Chief of the Law Review
for this year with John R. Dykema
and Robert Hancox as associate edi-
tors.
Subrick T. Kothe, Joseph N. Mor-
ency and T. M. Kubiniec were also
elected to the Student Editorial Board
as assistant editors.
The Law Review, prepared for
practitioners and scholars by the fac-
ulty and students of the Law School,
contains articles contributed by
prominent lawyers and educators and
annotated comments prepared by stu-
dents under the direction of the
faculty.

it {

UWRTH
---Last Day Today
THE BRIDE WORE BOOTS
with Barbara Stanwyck,
Robert Cummings
and
RENDEZVOUS 24
with William Gargan
- Wednesday and Thursday -
WITHOUT RESERVATIONS

YOU SAW TM IN ESQUIRE

t e t.

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Yes, sir, for comfort and ease,
this sure is the moccasin for
you! Masterfully crafted in an-
tique brown leather, it's rugged
and ready for a you do!

THE
CUT RATE
DOES IT AGAIN-
Always see us for those
Hard-to-Get items.
MEN'S PAJAMAS
MEN'S DRESS SHIRTS
including white, colored,
madras, etc.
KNIT SHORT
Elastic All Around
WHITE "T" SHIRTS'
97C
CORDUROY TROUSERS
DRESS TROUSERS
in Gabardines, Tweeds,
Serges, etc.
We guarantee the largest
selection in town to choose
from-
WOOL SHIRTS
in plaids or solid colors

A

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7.95

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JACKETS
Leather Gabardine,; Zelan,
Wool, etc.
SHOP US FOR THOSE
HARD-TO-GET ITEMS-
COMPLETE
HUNTING CLOTHES
FOR THE HUNTER
Wool or Khaki
ADAM HATS

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GLOVES - SOX - BELTS

I with PATRIC KNOWLES

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