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December 06, 1946 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1946-12-06

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E TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1946

MINUS McKINLAY:
Garg Staff Mourns Canoe as
Second Issue Goes to Press

C?

By PERRY LOGAN
BANSHEE HEADQUARTERS,
WHITMORE LAKE, DEC. 5-
(CIO)-Jubilation ran high here
tonight, when members of the
Gargoyle staff learned that Ed
(The Great Gatsby) McKinlay,
long-time managing editor of
Michigan's foremost humor maga-
zine, had mysteriously disappeared
when his canoe overturned on
the lake during the afternoon. His
feet were encased in cement at
the time.
Best of All Possible Worlds
McKinlay's friends expressed
the hope that he had been "taken
for a ride."
Cooper Union
Presents Art
Exhibit Here
Photographs of all sorts of art
work produced by students of
Cooper Union School in New York
are being displayed on the first
door of the architecture college
building until Dec. 20.
The exhibition, which recently
appeared at Michigan State Col-
lege, includes reproductions of
drawings, paintings, sculpture,
plastic design, advertising design,
architecture, textile design and
fashion illustration.
Cooper Union, founded in 1859
by Peter Cooper, is one of the best
art schools in the country, accord-
ing to Karl A. Kasten of the arch-
itecture college teaching staff.
Denied the opportunity of acquir-
ing a "formal education, Cooper
established his school on the prin-
ciples of free tuition for all stu-
dents and no discrimination in en-
trance requirements because of
race, creed, or color. During its 86
years of existence the school has
instructed approximately 210,-
000 students.
Polonia Club Sponsors
Talk on 'Poland Today'
"Poland Today" will be the top-
Ic of a talk by A. J. Rathnaw, De-
troit civic leader who recently re-
turned from a 9-month trip to
Poland as UNRRA representative,
at 8 p.m. Tuesday in the Inter-
national Center under the aus-
pices of the Polonia Club.

Comment from several of Mc-
Kinlay's 18,000 fellow students
about his passing was uniformly
dull, as most of them had never
-heard of him. He was described
by his colleagues on the Gargoyle
as mentally negligible.
General opinion in the teletype
room of The Daily had it that this
was just a publicity stunt to ad-
vertise the coming of the second
Gargoyle of the season, which re-
putedly will bring gales of laugh-
ter to an apathetic student body
when it appears all over campus
Wednesday. "After all," The
Daily's editorial director pointed
out, "they can always get a new
man. Managing editors are a dime
a dozen. Look at ours."
December Is Joy Month
It was generally agreed that the
December Garg was the high
point of McKinlay's impeccable
career. "It's a wonderful issue,"
he kept saying, referring to his
own story on St. Nicholas. Most
striking innovation in this issue
is a handsome red and black cov-
er designed by an inspired art
staff.
In a drive to unseat the New
York Sunday News as the period-
ical having the nation's largest
paid circulation per issue, six
million copies of the December
Garg have been printed for dis-
tribution Wednesday. "We expect
to sell throughout Washtenaw
County," the circulation manager
has announced.
Koussevitzky
Will Conduct
The Boston Symphony Orches-
tra, under the direction of Serge
Koussevitzky, will present the
sixth concert of the Choral Union
Series at 8:30 p.m. Monday.
Since its founding in 1881, the
Orchestra has established a
world-wide reputation for musi-
cal excellence. In addition to its
regular winter schedule of broad-
casts, concert tours and record-
ings, the orchestra presents
"Pops" concerts and the open-air
Esplanade Concerts, given on the
banks of the Charles River, dur-
ing the summer. Completing its
crowded schedule, the Orchestra
gives the famous concerts of the
Berkshire Symphonic Festival an-
nually.

PARK TREES FEED FIRES-As part of a city-directed program to prevent suffering during the
coal strike, many old trees are being felled in Pueblo, Colo., municipal parks. Here a logging crew
equipped with crosscut saws, axes and tractor-driven buzzsaws prepares wood in Mineral Palace
Park for the municipal fuel stockpile.
CAPSHG IHS

'Alexander Nevsky'. . .
Sergei Eisenstein's "Alexander
Nevsky" will be presented under
the auspices of the Russian Circle
at 8:30 p.m.htoday and tomorrow
in the Rackham Lecture Hall.
Eisenstein, one of Russia's most
prominent directors, and ergei
Prokofieff, contemporary Soviet
composer, have collaborated to
produce a film, reported to be the
greatest to have been made in
Russia.
India Art Exhibition ...
An Indian Art Exhibition will
be held from 4 to 10 p.m. today
and tomorrow in the East Con-
ference Roam of the Rackham
Building under the auspices of
the Hindustan Association.
Films on the life and culture
of India will be shown at 7:15

p.m. both days in Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
The exhibit will contain
handwoven fabrics, including
silks and brocades from Ben-
ares, various printed silks from
Dacca, Bangalore, and Kash-
mir, and typical peasant em-
broidery from Kathiawar and
Sindh.
Recital Program ...
Prof. William H. Stubbins of
the music school and Mrs. Mary
McCall Stubbins will present a
clarinet and piano recital at 8:30
p.m. today in the Rackham As-
sembly Hall.
Three sonatas for clarinet and
piano by Brahms, Saint-Saens
and Hindemuth will highlight the
program which will be open to
the general public without charge.

Youth Hostel Plans.. .
The American Youth Hostdl
group will hold a square dance
at 8:00 p.m. today at Lane Hall.
This undergraduate outing
group will hike along the Huron
River Sunday starting at 2:3)
p.m. from Lane Hall. All stu-
dents are invited to attend the
activities.
Atom Talk at Hillel . .
Dr. Martin Chanin, research as-
sistant in the Rackham Arthritis
Research Unit, will speak on "Im-
plications of Atomic Energy" fol-
lowing services at 7:45 p.m. today
in the B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-1
tion.
Services will be led by Jay Sing-1
er and will include music by the
Hillel Choir.

Church News
Parties and open houses will be
held by the student religious
guilds today.
Members of the CONGREGA-
TIONAL-DISCIPLES GUILD will
meet at 8 p.m. at the Guild House
for an ice-skating party to be held
in the Coliseum.
** *
* * *
An open house will be held by
the CANTERBURY CLUB from 4
to 6 p.m. at the Student Center.
A Handicraft Party will be giv-
en by the Methodist WESLEYAN
GUILD at 8:30 p.m. in the Guld
House. Members may bring their
own handicraft materials.
A NEWMAN CLUB open house
with refreshments and entertain-
ment will be held from 8 p.m. to
midnight.
* * *
ROGER WILLIAMS GUILD will
meet for a Variety Party at 8:30
p.m. in the Guild House.
The Young Married Couples'
group of the Baptist Church will
have a Pot-Luck Supper from 5:30
to 7:30 p.m. Reservations can be
macec at "332.
Square dancing, sponsored by
the WESTMINSTER GUILD, will
be held at 8:30 p.m. in the Guild
House.
Members will attend a Bible
class conducted by Dr. W. P. Lem-
on at 7:30 p.m.
Robinson Joins
Extension Staff
William G. Robinson, a former
staff member of the federal emer-
gency recreation program, has
joined the staff of the Michigan
Experimental Program in Adult
Education as assistant in com-
munity organization, Dr. Charles
A. Fisher, director of the Uni-
versity Extension Service an-
nounced yesterday.
Robinson will be available on
request to communities in Michi-
gan for consultation and advice
in connection with the organiza-
tion and development of com-
munity councils and in connection
with community organization, civ-
ic and social planning, and the
organization of adult education
and community recreation pro-
grams, Dr.'Fisher said.
Veterans...
(Continued from page 1)
been the lot of far too many de-
serving men."
A third major recommendation
was to amend certain administra-
tive portions of the G.I. Bill of
Rights "Which currently does not
provide for either effective or ef-
ficient operation."
Would Coordinate Agencies
Rockefeller, 33, whose brother
Nelson is a former Assistant Sec-
retary of State, proposed appoint-
ment of a czar of veterans affairs
to coordinate the work of fifteen
or more federal agencies which he
said currently were concerned
with veterans' affairs.
The veterans administration,
Rockefeller said, has done a "spec-
tacular" job and he refrained from
criticizing General Omar N. Brad-
ley, the veterans' administrator.
The Negro veteran, he asserted,
has encountered the most diffi-
culties in reverting to civilian life

"Because his color nullifies the
fact that he is a veteran."

Although no effective treatment
for Hansen's disease (leprosy) has
yet been -developed, the results of
current research with certain sul-
fanilimide drugs are "very en-
couraging," Dr. Malcolm H. Soule
of the bacteriology department
revealed yesterday upon his re-
turn from the Pan American Con-
ference on Leprosy in Rio de
Janeiro.
Chosen by the State Depart-
ment as United States representa-
tive, Dr. Soule acted as general
secretary, to the conference. He
has done extensive research on
the causative agent of leprosy,
Hansen's bacillus.
Dr.. Soule explained that the
name ,"Hansen's disease" is being
used to replace "leprosy" because
of the stigma generally attached
to the latter term.
Chaulmoogra oil, which was
used for centuries in treating lep-
ers, is considered to have had
beneficial results in many cases,
Dr. Soule said. However, he added,
authorities are "still hoping for
something better" than either
sulfaniiihideedrugs or the oil.
Medical Druvs
y e
History Given
It was a mixture of "crabs' eyes,
coral, harts' horns, wood lice,
pearls and vipers" that patients
used to complain about as bitter
medicine, Prof. Frederick F. Blicke
of the pharmaceutical chemistry
department said in a review of the
history of drugs.
Although man has been inter-
ested for centuries in drugs capa-
ble of curing disease, little or no
progress wills made before the
middle of the 19th century, Prof.
Blicke declared. He said that up
to that time medical treatments
rcmained much the same as those
used in Egypt 3,000 years earlier.
"Solely because of the modern
developments in the basic sciences
of chemistry, physics, and biology,
a truly miraculous improvement
in drug therapy has been made,"
Prof. Blicke indicated.

Direct contact with a leper is
the only known means of con-
tracting the disease, Dr. Soule
declared. Hansen's disease actual-
ly presents no problem in the
United States, he said, as the
approximately 1,500 leprous per-
sons are either in a hospital at
Carville, La., or under the control
of Boards of Health.
Law Fraternity
Is Reactivated
The Campbell chapter of Phi
Alpha Delta, national law fra-
ternity, was reactivated after a
wartime lapse of 4 years at a for-
nal initiation and dinner held
Tuesday night at the Union.
Presiding. at the initiation of 19
new members was Supreme Jus-
tice of the National Executive
Board, J. Harry La Brum of Phil-
adelphia. Dean E. Blythe Stason
of the Law School, Prof. H. R.
Ynetema and alumni of the fra-
ternity from Chicago and De-
troit were on hand for the cere-
monies.
New officers elected at the
meeting were: Forrest Hainline,
Jr., '47 Justice; George R. Cook,
'48 Vice-Justice; Robert Radcliffe,
'48 Clerk; Robert J. Hodgson, '47
Treasurer; and Jarrett R. Clark,
'48, Marshall Hainline was elect-
ed to represent the chapter at
the national convention to be
held Dec. 29, 30, and 31 at Kan-
sas City, Missouri.

LEPROSY TREATMENT:
New Sulfanilimide Research'
Shows Encouraging Results

North Main Opposite Court House
Ends Tonight
"DANGER WOMAN"
and "PRAIRIE BADMAN"
>tarts Saturday
Leo Gorey in
"BOWVERY BOMBSHELL"
-plus--- Roy Acuff in
"NIGHT TRAIN
TO MEMPHIS"
News and Last Chapter
"SCARLET HORSEMAN"

CLPN-,tSSIVIED ADVERTISING

Continuous
Daily
from 1 P.M.

A#SOR903Y#EWIEWFA7f

Weekdays
30c
to 5 P.M.

LOST AND FOUND

TRANSPORTATION

Here's ONE
Lion that's not
Growling ... He
Had his dinner
at the v
OPEN: Weekdays 7:30 A.M. - 8:00 P.M.
Sundays 1 1 :30 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
YOUR RESTAURANT ON THE CAMPUS

THE RUSSIAN CIRCLE PRESENTS
THE GREATEST HISTORICAL FILM
EVER TO COME OUT OF RUSSIA
SERGEI EISENSTEIN'S
ALEXAINDE'nR NEYSKY
Rackham Lecture Hall
December 6th and 7th at 8:30 P.M.
Tickets ... 44e
at Wahris and the Union Basement
On nights of performance tickets will be sold
yr -l.T nnc~n Gt'JAr nl

-" i

TAKEN: Aaskan Mouton Coat from
theCab, Nov. 29. Please return
coat. Mai :seys! Coat can be identi-
fied. Naiicy Walker, 459 Jordan Hall.
Reward. )31
LOST: Pearl necklace Wed. evening be-
tween Presbyterian church and En-
gineering Bldg. Reward. 8904. )13
LOST: Paul, please, where are you?
Babe. ) 33
LADIES gold wrist watch. Gold band.
One diamond on each side of face.
Reward for return. Call Barbara
Weisberg at 2-6654 between 6 and 8.
)32
LOST in E. E Lab., ringfolder contain-
ing very essential notes in graduate
E. E. courss. Keep folder as reward,
but turn ir notes or mail to E. E.
Office. John Vajda. )62
LOST: Ladies gold Bulova Wrist Watch
on Forest Ave between Withams and
Hill St. Reward! Call Margaret Al-
len, 2-5618.
LOST: Small brown Suitcase, brown
leather ('d5ing. Sunday evening be-
tween Michigan Central and Jordan.
Reward. i'inder please call Room
497, Jordan Hall, 2-4561. )20
LOST: Camel Hair Overcoat. Call Milt
Wagner at 8501. )27
LOST: Red gold Loop Earring between
League and E. Huron Sat, night. Re-
ward. Call Mickey, 7851. ) 23
MISCELLANEOUS
THE ROSICRUSC IONS FELLOWSHIP
Study Group 611 W. Main St. invite
you to read the following books
through our free lending library.
The Riosierusions Cosmo Concep-
tion, ""The Mystical Interpretations
of Christmas," "Mysteries of the
Great Operas" and others. - Phone
2-1507. )22
UNWANTED HAIR permanently re-
moved! Short wave method-faster,
painless. Phone 6373, First National
Building. )35
PHOTOSTATIC COPYING, Discharges,
Marriage Certificates, drawings en-
larged or reduced. Leave your work
at Calkins-Fletcher Drugs. Purchase
camera. Card & Camera Shop. )30
PERSONAL
WOMAN: For heaven's sake don't make
plans for December 15. It's a night
to remember! Man! )18

COUPLE wants ride to and from New
York for Christmas recess. Share ex-
penses, help drive. Call M. Fuchs,
6375. Leave Message. )21
WANTED: Ride for one or two to
N.Y.C. Friday afternoon, December
20th. Can drive and wil share ex-
penses. Please call 2-4591, 203 Tyler.
)17

HELP WANTED

WANTED: Ride Ky. or Cincinnati, Dec.
20. Will share expenses, help drive.
Call Lewis Combest, Law Club. )10
AM WALKING to Aberdeen, Washing-
ton on December 20. Would accept
ride to vicinity if offered, and share
expenses. Call "Ed" 2-3241, Ext. 02.)34
STUDENT WISHES RIDE to Washing-
ton, D.C, Richmond, Va., or point
toward Miami on Dec. 19, 20, 21.
Phone Paul at 4707. )5
TRANSPORTATION to Erie, Pennsyl-
vania December 20. Will share ex-
,penses and driving. Call Jerry Honey
2-1405. )16
CALIFORNIA, here I come. Student
wishes to spend Xmas in Los Angeles.
Will share expenses and help drive.
Call Bill, 2-1032, evenings. )13
GOING TO PITTSBURG at Christmas?
Willing to share expenses and driv-
ing. Phone 7330.)9
BOSTON BOUND? Two students desire
ride leaving Dec. 20. Will share driv-
ing and expenses. Phone 7330 (Ed
Canner). )11
WILL SHARE expenses in return for
ride to Georgia Dec. 20. Call 5974.)60
WANTED: Ride to Kansas City or vi-
cinity by two student veterans for
Christmas Holiday. Leaving about
Dec. 20. Will help drive and share
expenses. Call 7012. D. D. Sagaser.)61
WANTED: Two rides to vicinity of
Indianapolis, or Muncie, Indiana,
Dec. 20-21. Students. Share expenses.
Phone 8688, evenings. )2
STUDENT AND WIFE desire ride to
Philadelphia around Dec. 20. Will
help drive and share expenses. Bill
Taylor, No. 12 Vets Village, City. )28
WANTED: ride Tuscon, Ariz, around
20 Dec. Share driving and expenses.
Phone 2-4591, Ext. 322 Tyler. )25
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED TO RENT: Complete set of
tails for Dec. 14. Size 42L. Please
call 2-2565-Urgent. )3
TUTORING
TUTORING in Mathematics by MIT
graduate, class of 1924. John Alden
Buckler, 115 Catherine, Ypsilanti, tel.
Ypsi 3678W. Reverse charges. )1

GIRLS, 17 and over. We will train you
for a career as a telephone operator.
An experienced operator is always in
demand. Apply at Mich. Bell Tele-
phone Co., 323 E. Washington St. )43
FOR RENT
ROOM to rent to 1 male occupant from
Dec. 14 to Feb 8 only, 1105 Church
St., Phone 2-2919. )29
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: hart, Schaffner and Marx
Tails Coat and Vest, size 36 long.
Call Ted Bates, 2-6671. )7
FOR SALE: girl's 3-piece blue wool
Snow Suit, size 3. Call 8410 after
1:00 P.M. )24
FOR XMAS--A Spaulding tennis rac-
quet-Mercer Beasley, Krobat, Lam-
ina with $8 gut plus a crisp, new $5
bill. All for $20. This is no snow
job. Call me, 2-7360, Dean McClusky,
417 8th St. )6
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING: theses, term papers, addres-
ses, etc. Duplicating.: notices, form
letters, programs, etc. A-2 Typing
Service, 232 Nickels Arcade, Phone
9811.)4
MIDWAY Bicycle Shop, 322 E. Liberty.
We have rebuilt used bikes for sale.
Your bike can be expertly repaired
also. ) 56
CHUMLEE'S
FREE DELIVERY of your favorite sand-
wiches and beverages. Every day but
Monday, 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. Phone
2-6429. )8
ELECTROLUX VACCUM CLEANERS
Sales - John Jadwin - Service
855 Tappan Phone 2-7412 or 2-2683 )41
TYPEWRITERS, OFFICE MACHINES,
cleaned, repaired. Work guaranteed.
Three-day service. Calculators sold
and rented. Pick-up and delivery.
Office Equipment Service' Co., 111 S.
4th Ave., 2-1213. )26
TAILORING and SEWING
CUSTOM MADE CLOTHES-Formals-
Remodeling-Alterations. "Bring your
sewing problems to us." Hildegarde
Shop, 116 E. Huron, 2-4669. )45

WWWUE 11TH
-- Today and Saturday -
"THE WALLS
CAME TUMBLING DOWN"
with Marguerite Chapman
Lee Bowman
-and-
"MY PAL TRIGGER"
with Roy Rogers

WANTED
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A bet-
ter price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E.
Washington St. )14
WANTED: Annex for fraternity house
to accommodate at least 8 persons.
Needed for spring semester of 1948 or
for fall semester of 1948. Please call
Ken Tapp, 2-3189. )36

TODAY AND SATURDAY

I

Extra-
CA RTOON 11 WORLD NEWS
HENPECKED HOBOES
Coming PAUL MUNI
Sunday! "ANGEL ON MY SHOULDER"
P/wne 5 736.
FREE DELIVERY
on $2.00 Food Order or over.
Hamburgs (with Everything!)'..20c
Hot Dogs (with Everything!)'. . . 15c
g Salad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20c
Ham Salad.................20c
Saiarni . . . .............. . . . . 15c
Cold M eat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15c
Peanut Butter ................,10c
French Fries .................15c
Coffee (Per Pt.) ..............10c
Milk (Including Deposit) ......12c
Cold Drinks.. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . 7c

I

GIFTS TO HIS

m11 the L .~Leaueiy ouiy.

*

--

S ..- ~ ;.~-:-''-t}
O$A G##
WU4S
1o rDatS

<£
ru
s .r
,,-

/ikih9
FROM HIS STORE
Beau Bruinmell Ties$....
......$1.00 to $2.50
Coopers Sox ....39c to $1.50
Champ Hats . . . $7.50 to $10

-- -

MICIIIGAN

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