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September 28, 1946 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1946-09-28

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sATUORAY, SEPTRMBElR 28, 1946

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

4

Few Good Student Seats Overshadowed by Distributio

n Row

By TOM WALSH
'J'HE EXTENSIVE publicity accorded the Student Legislature's
attack upon the scandalous handling of student football tick-
ets distribution has overshadowed the far more basic question of
the overall student seating which has been aptly called a "stink-
ing mess" by one irate student.
No, 25 to 40 yard line tickets for students are not exact-
ly a myth. The story is, however, that only 816 seats have
been reserved for students in this favored location. From
this half of section 24 the Senior and Grad tickets go down
to between the 5 and 10 with the Junior seats running
around to the corner oP the end zone.J
The great body of insignificant sophomores and freshmen
have been relegated to positions extending from that corner
across the end zone to the far edge of the field.

Thus far most of the righteous indignation of the cam-
pus has been centered upon the "unethical" undergraduates
who fraudulently obtained the "good" seats of the upper
classes. However, a general uproar can reaaonably be pre-
dicted for after today's game, when the great bulk of the
campus finds itself, as one student put it, "right behind the
team. Sitting."
"WHY IS FOOTBALL being played at the University?" is a
question which should be answered officially either by the
Athletic Association or the University administration to the sat-
isfaction of all the students.
It would be nice to believe that football is considered a
school sport, played by our fellow students for the student
body. If this viewpoint were in good repute here at Michigan,
the students would have been given a preference on tickets

and the majority of us would not be sitting in the end zones
with portable radios this afternoon.
Instead, it is all too apparent that Michigan students can
take their places humbly after the priorities of the alumni and
the Almighty dollar.
In spite of the rather dubious excuses that the school
must pay off the bonded indebtedness of the stadium and fi-
nance its athletic program by the game receipts, as well as
cater to influential alumni, this is still a university and WE
are the student body. Is it asking too much, then, to have the
students sit where they can watch their team play?
SOME BIG TEN schools like Purdue divide the stadium down
the center, seating the students from one side of the 50-yard
line and the alumni on the other. Had Michigan approached
ticket distribution with even this degree of preference for its
students, nearly two thousand of the student tickets in the end

zone would have been between the 35 and 50-yard lines. Such a
distribution would have meant that each of us would have been
some 15 yards closer to the 50 than our seats are now located.
Certainly many of us will some day be alumni and will
be equally as eager to see the games as the present group.
Still, any school is run for the benefit of its current students
and the school's athletic contests are supposed to be, or at
least should be, conducted primarily by and for the student
body.
The practice of giving the students the left-over tickets to
their own football games has grown steadily worse here for years.
It is about time that we received an honest statement of policy
from the University regarding the present sorry plight of stu-
dent seating. It is time, too, that the present policy of catering
to the alumni and the box office at the expense of the students
be changed.

Cardinals Lose to Cubs, 7-2,
To Drop into Tie With Brooks

Zale Keeps Middleweight Title
In Pier Six Brawl with Rocky

Feller Whiffs
Six To Equal
Waddell Mark
DETROIT, Sept. 27-(I)-Bob Fel-
ler, Iowa fireball pitcher of the Cleve-
land Indians, struck with a quick-
breaking curve today to fan six De-
troit batsmen in five innings and
equal Rube Waddell's 42-year-old De-
troit batsmen in five innings and
equal Rube Waddell's 42-year-old
modern Major League record of 343
strikeouts in a single season.
The Indians overcame a four-run
deficit to win the game 9 to 8.
Feller, who entered the game in
the fifth inning, relieving 23-year-old
Bob Kuzava, fanned five of the first
eight men to face him but it was not
until the ninth inning that Jimmy
Outlaw went down swinging at the
pitch that put rapid Robert in the
record book.
Needing one more strikeout to
achieve the mark at which he has
been shooting by working out of turn,
Feller may be given a chance to pitch
long enough tomorrow to put Wad-
dell's 1904 mark into discard. Even
if he doesn't pitch Saturday he will
start the last game of the season Sun-
day against Detroit's southpaw ace,
Hal Newhouser.
North Main Opposite Court House
- Starts Today -
James Cagney in
"CITY FOR CONQUEST,'
plus
Shirley Burnette in
"HEADIN' WEST"
News & Serial

Polle tChased as
Borowy Is Wiiiner
By The Associated Press
ST. LOUIS, Sept. 27-St. Louis
pennant hopes hit a new low tonight
as the Cardinals dropped into an
exact first place tie with the idle
Brooklyn Dodgers by bowing to the
Chicago Cubs 7-2: Each club has on-
ly two games to play.
Thus the slumping Red Birds, who
had held tight to the National
League lead since Aug. 28, found
themselves in a wild scramble to
force the Dodgers into a three-game
post-season playoff.
While the Cards take on the
Chicago team tomorrow night and
Sunday in single games, the Dodg-
ers play the Boston Braves, the
team with which the Cubs are scrap-
ping for third place.
Most press box observers were in-
clined to favor the probability of a
tie after tonight's results and there
was every indication that the world
series would have to be pushed back
to make room for the extra games.
No longer a matter of future plan-
ning Manager Eddie Dyer picked Har-
ry (Th Cat) Brecheen, who has been
able to beat the Cubs five times this
season, to go after tomorrow's
game. His opponent will be Paul
Erickson, a right hander, who got
the job when manager Charley
Grimm had *o call on Hank Wyse
in relief in opener after Hank
Borowy had uo give way because of
a blister on his pitching hand.
Borowy, who had beaten Howie
Pollet, the Birds' ace, last Sunday in
Chicago pitched the same kind of a
ball game and. actually won by the
same score although he couldn't fin-
ish.
Failure of the St. Louis hitters was
the reason for their defeat although
Pollet, plainly showing the strain of
carrying most of the pitching bur-
den, was not at top form. Not until
the eighth inning did the Cards score
as they had managed to tally only
nine runs in their last six starts.
The handwriting was on the wall
for Pollet as early as the third inn-
ing when the Cards' No. 1 boy and
20-game winner, staggered around
the premises under a three-hit at-
tack that yielded only one run.
Only the fact that Borowy, who
opened the inning with a single, was
picked off first base kept the Cubs
from lowering the boom on Pollet at
that early hour.
Stan Hack's first single, followed
by a walk to Lou Stinger and a run-
scoring single by Ed Waitkus brought
manager Eddie Dyer to the mound
for a conference with his ace. He de-
cided to stick with him dand Pollet
got out of the inning.
He wasn't so lucky in the fourth
when singles by Hack and Stringer
with two out following a walk to Bill
Nicholson and Marty Marion's boot
of Billy Jurges' hopper sent him to
the showers.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
STA h
N AmBORS .NEWS*M TM5AK
Last Times Today
IN TECHNICOLOR!
®o . -mrm=0C==
5 with DANA ANDREWS A^ffS
BRIAN DONLEVY
SUSAN HAYWARD
Coming Sunday-
.7I :.I

"B" Gridders
To Play Today
"We will concede nothing to our
oponents," intoned Coach Wally We-
ber yesterday afternoon, as he dis-
missed his "B" team to the showers
after the last scrimage before their
initial clash with Grand Rapids Jun-
ior College at 10:30 a.m. today.
Weber has made no changes in the
opening line-up he announced two
days ago. The back-field will be John
Ghindia at quarter, James Holgate
and Norman Jackson at the halfs,
and Jack Harbaugh at full.
In the line, ends are Irvin Wisnie-
wski and Bruce Beatty, tackles Johh
Eizones and Bill LaBenda, guards
Alan Fitch and John Maturo, and
center Tony Momsen.

Beau Jack
Declines Bout
NEW YORK, Sept. 27-(IP)-The
New York State Athletic Commission
today offered Beau Jack a fight with
Ray Robinson to decide on a new wel-
terweight champion, but the Beau re-
fused and countered with the sug-
gestion that the commission award
the title to Ray immediately, without
further argument.
The 147-pound crown has been va-
cant since Marty Servo announced his
retirement from the ring a few days
ago because of a nose injury.
Jack, former World Lightweight
Champion, announced through his
manager, Chick Wergeles, that he was
turning down a bout with Robinson
at this time because of his lack of ex-
perience among welterweights.

GENE DERRICOTTE, starting left
halfback, will probably be one of
the Wolverines' big guns today as
the locals attempt to avenge two
straight defeats at the hands of In-
diana.

CLASSIFIEDADVERTISING_

Tony Climbs OffY
Canvas for I1(0.
By The Associated Press
YANKEE STADIUM, New York,
Sept. 27-Tony Zale, every inch a
champion, came back from the verge
of a knockout tonight to flatten the
mighty-punching Rocky Graziano in
the sixth round of a blood-and-
thunder brawl and retain his World
Middleweight Championship. Zale
weighted 160; Graziano 154..
Floored once himself, his face a
bloody mass as the dynamiter from
New York's lower eastside turned
loose his famed "rock-a-bye punch,"
the one-time Indiana steel millhand
caught up with the challenger mid-
way of the sixth to drop him with a
lightning left hand and put him
away for keeps at 1 minute 43 seconds
of a sixth session of their scheduled
15-rounder.
It was the second knockdown of
the fight for Rocky the Rock, in as
vicious and bloody a brawl as has
been seen in any ring. But this sec-
ond time, apparently softened up by
the body bombs that are Tony's spe-
cialty, he couldn't make it to his feet
again.
He sat on the ring canvas,.holding
the middle strand of the ropes, as
Referee Ruby Goldstein,bhimself a
.classy welterweight of a bygone era,
counted the full ten to leave the 160-
pound crown on Tony's head in his
first defense as champion.
The finish was as startling as it was
definite and final and one of the
greatest crowds ever to see two little
men in action roared for ten minutes
in shocked surprise at the suddenness
of the end.
For, up to that point, through three
of the last four completed rounds,
Graziano had given Tony a going over
so fiercely and ferociously with his
right hand, that when the fifth round
ended, some ringsiders were even
wondering whether the Champion
could come out for the sixth. But out
he came, bleeding from his mouth,
his face a smear, and Rocky started
right in again. Then, suddenly, Tony
caught Rocky against the ropes with
two of those "Tummy Torpedo" spe-
vials of his. The Rock covered up,
came half way across the ring.

(Continued from Page 1)

Michigan pass defense is weak and
Raimondi will be pitching.
To provide the Maize and Blue
fireworks Crisler will have such
flashy backs as Gene Derricotte,
"Bumps" Elliott, Bob Chappuis and
Paul White, all dangerous runners
and better than average passers.
The probable starting lineups with
players' numbers in parentheses:

INDIANA
olHasapes (8)
Goldsberry (78)
Brown (73)d
Cannady (38)
Sowinski ( 77)
Deal c67)
Mihajlovich (81)
raimondi (46)
Dewar (40)
Groomes (57)

LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT"
RE
QB
LH
H111

MICHIGAN
McNeill (5
Hilkene (75)
BurgCl (7
Callahan (5")
Kraeger (74)
Pritnla (72)
Renner (2)
Yerges (24)
Derricotte (41)
F Whie (16)

Football

...

Pihos (35)

FB 'Weisen urger (48 )

--=

-------

Last Day Today
"THE HURRICANE"
with Dorothy Lamour-Jon Hall
-and-
"BORDER BANDITS"
with Johnny Mack Brown
Starts Sunday
"THE BRIDE WORE BOOTS"
-and-
"RENDEZVOUS 24"

WANTED TO RENT
WANTED: Apartment or furnished room.
My husband will be home from the Pa-
cific next week. Does anyone know of
a place to live while I finish school?
Call 2-5587. )28
FOR RENT
ARRANGEMENTS are being made for the
housing of 8 single male graduate stu-
dents. These accommodations will be
ready in "approximately one week. For
information call 7715 between 5-6 p.m.
Do not call other hours. )36
WANTED
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A better
price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. )14
WANTED TO BUY: 2 Army tickets reason-
ably. Have Dictaphone in perfect condi-
tion for sale. Cali 2-7232. )43
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Black leather case including Leica
camiera. Lost at Del Hi Is~nd. Identi-
fication: A.D. Engstrom. Reward.dCall
Rodi Olson, 2-2521. )34
LOST: Parker "51", grey with silver top.
Lost Sunday in State Theatre. Return
to Robert McColley, Rm 111 Allen Rum-
sey. )20
LOST: Glasses (red case), Tues. between
Angell Hall and Kresge's. Return to
Beth Grim 236 S. Thayer, 8930. Reward.
)38
WILL THE PERSON who left a fountain
pen at The Daily table at registration
contact Tom Walsh at 2-3241. )29
LOST: One green Shaeffer pencil with
name. Sally Lichtig. Phone 7851. )24
WRIST WATCH, initials C.R.S., on back.
Lost on Willow Run bus Sept. 25. Re-
ward. Notify C. R. Stone, 1158 Ware Ct.,
Willow Run, or Michigan Daily. )23
LOST: Silver identification bracelet, ini-
tials E.R.R. 1945 on back, AGO on front.
Reward. Call Sue Robertson, 2-3225. )22
LOST: Green felt folder containing dental
instruments. Urgently needed. Beverly
Barclay, phone 2-2591. )20
FOR SALE
MUSIC: As you want it on the portable
electric phonograph. Beautiful tone,
snazzy looks. Call Charlie at 2-4925 fob
demonstration. ) 8
FOR SALE: Boy's bicycle in excellent con-
dition. Call Mrs. James, 4489. )47
FOR SALE: Phonograph record changer,
good condition. Phone 5204. )48

CROSLEY FROSTMASTER deep-freeze
cabinet. Brand new, 1946 model, 3.2 ,cu.
ft., hermetically sealed. $132.00. Call
258566. )51
SECOND HAND,3cheap but good: 1) violin,
2) B. Guitar 3)} Clarinet. Please phone
2-2521 Ext. 331, Dr. Wang. )30
SILVER blended racoon coat. (Ladies 14).
$350 value. worn less than one season.
$250 or best offer. Call 4046 evenings. )21
JAZZ RECORDS: Collectors' items from
1919 to 1946, including Ellington, Arm-
strong, Goodman Trio. CalI 3425. )31
MISCELLANEOUS
C. & M. TRUCKING CO. Trunks, suitcases
and small move jobs Call 21721 for es-
timates. )2
TENNIS, BADMINTON, SQUASH racquets
restrung. Nylon job now will be just as
good next spring. Phone 2-7360, Dean
McClusky, 417 8th St. )4
SEWING: Alterations and repairs on wo-
men's and girls' garments. Let me keep.
your wardrobe in good repair. Miss Liv-
ingston, 315£ ). Division, 2nd floor front.
HELP WANTED
FOUNTAIN HELP: Top pay, hours to suit
your requirements. Apply in person to
Witham Drug. )32
AVON OFFERS splended opportunity to
earn during the Christmas season just
ahead. Pleasant work, hours to suit your
convenience. No experience needed.
Write Box 59, Michigan Daily. )3
MAGAZINE EDITOR is seeking secretary
proficient in shorthand and typing. 40-
hour week. Call 7205 for interview. )19
FOUNTAIN HELP: Girl or young lady to
work at soda fountain. Full time or
mornings. No evenings or Sundays.
Swift's Drug Store, 340 S. State St.,
Phone 3534. )39
WANTED: Girls for commercial photo fin-
ishing plant. Automatic printers, no ex-
perience necessary. Apply Miss Green 4
to 5 p.m. Ivory Photo 1030 E. Univer-
sity Ave. )41
MUSICIANS WANTED: Semi-name band
reorganizing. Phone 2-4176 or 7590. )42
CUNNINGHAM'S
SODA FOUNTAIN
Women and girls needed for soda fountain
sales clerks. Day work. Good pay. Meals
and uniforms furnished.
Attention: students and students' wives;
we are in a position to arrange a schedule
to conform with your available hours-
either full or part time.

Apply at ,226 S. Main St., Cunningham
Drug Co. )26
WANTED: Philippine male student with
dining room experience for part-time &
banquet work. Phone 8656. )55
LIGHT ASSEMBLY WORK: Hours 8 to 5.
40 hour week. Pleasant surroundings.
Good working conditions. VOKAR CORP.
7300 Huron River Drive, Dexter, Mich.
) 54
CELLISTS, violinists, violists interested in
contacting others for quartet playing:
phone 2-6133. )53
ROOM and BOARD plus nominal salary
for girl with nursing experience in ex-
change for care of 3-months old baby.
Beautifulhome in most attractive sec-
tion of Ann Arbor. Close to campus and
bus line. Phone 2-2670. )50
PROTRAVCO world-wide organization has
openings for promotion-minded students
on part-time basis. Address Promotion
Travel Company, Box 52, Michigan Daily.
Remember "Protravco Does Everything."
)37
WANTED: Dishwashers to work for board.
Contact Phi Sigma Kappa house man-
ager, Orlyn Lewis, or call 2-6500. )27
GOOD HOME-COOKED meals at the Ac-
acia Fraternity for waiting tables or
dishwashing. See Russ Buster at 1923
Geddes, or call 2-6674. )25

ICHIGAN
Ending Saturday
y AN ~_aO LLO 'KENAIN WNN
1' INI TCIIN/COL OR! I
Sunday

STENOGRAPH ERS
TABULATING
OPERATORS
COM PTOM ETE R
OPERATOR
APPLY
KAISE R-FRAZE R
CORP.
Willow Run, Mich.

I

UNSIGHTLY HAIR GONE FOREVER
"New Short Wave Method"
Faster - Permanent -Safe
ELECTROLYSIS
GOLD MIRROR BEAUTY SHOP
First National Bldg. Ph. 6373 or 7767

I

I

a

Every Saturday Night at 9:00 P.M.
J BOB HUVAERE and his Orchestra g
BLUE LANTE RN
^ ISLAND LAKE - BRIGHTON
1 c c c o o o o o---><---o---><-->0---><---0

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Ii ,ii

BUSINESS
AND ADVERTISING
EXPERIENCE
Obfainzcd irsft-baud on

~MICHIGiAN
FELT
PENNANTS-BANNERS- ANIMALS
The most beautiful selection in town
at

1 M|M~mrmm#MM28*mmmI

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