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November 22, 1946 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-22

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PAGE TWO

TAI MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 22, 1946

. 1 ICIANDAL

RIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1946

!W ,z ._

Church News

PATRIOTIC PLANS:
Syrian Engineering Student
Studying to Help Homeland
(. ---- ____

Student Veteran's Notes

.i

Social programs have been planned
by the student religious groups for
today.
An open house for all students will
be held by the CANTERBURY CLUB
from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Student Cen-
ter.
Dancing, entertainment and re-
freshments will be included in the
program of the NEWMAN CLUB open
ROTC Position
Blanks Ready
Application blanks are now avail-
able at ROTC Headquarters for spe-
cialist appointments to the War De-
partment's 1947 integration program
of new regular Army officers, Major
Robert H. Scott of the ROTC said
yesterday.
Specialists may be in intelligence,
electronics, , public relations, and
chemical, radio mechanical, and
meteorological engineering.
Any former AtJS officer who saw
service after Dec. 7, 1941 is eligible to
apply. Officees will be commissioned
in the permanent grades of second or
first lieutenant, captain, or major
according to their age and commis-
sioned service in World War II.
Applications from those who have
not applied before must be in by
Dec. 31. Men who have previously
applied must have their new appli-
cations in by Nov. 30.

house from 8 p.m. to midnight in
the clubrooms.
A ballad sing will be given by
the CONGREGATIONAL-DISCI-
PLES GUILD at 7:30 p.m. at the
Guild House.
Dr. Lemon will conduct a Bible class
at 7:30 p.m. at a WESTMINISTER
GUILD meeting. An open house in-
cluding games and dancing will fol-
low at 8:30 p.m.
A married students dinner and so-
cial evening will be held by GAMMA
DELTA at 6 p.m. at the Center.
A supper and social meeting for
the married group of the LU-
THERAN STUDENT ASSOCIA-
TION will be given at 6 p.m. A
joint party with the Roger Wil-
liams Guild will be held at 8:15
p.m. Reservations may be made
by calling 7622.
The ROGER WILLIAMS GUILD
will entertain the Lutheran Student
Association at the Guild House.
Hillel To Sponsor
Vocational. Talks
The B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
will conduct two programs and vo-
cational guidance interviews this
weekend.
Following ,services at 7:45 p.m. to-
day, Prof. Frank Huntley of the Eng-
lish department will speak on "Amer-
ica's Role in the Far East."
MICHIGAN COUNSELING SERVICE
WILL GIVE THREE MAJOR TEST
BATTERIES ON DEC. 7, 9 a.m. to
1 p.m., 330 Nickels Arcade.
STUDY HABITS INVENTORY:
Stanford Study Habits Test, Emo-
tional Equilibrium, Preference Sur-
very, Otis Intelligence.
BUSINESS APTITUDE TEST: Gill
Clerical, Reesen Extravert, Emotion-
al Equilibrium, Otis Intelligence,
Manual Dexterity.
CAREER TESTS: Educational Apti-
tude, Otis Intelligence, Gill Clerical,
Manual Dexterity, Public Contact,
Preference Survey.
CALL 9495 AFTER 3 P.M. FOR IN-
FORMATION..

TO RELIEVE MISERY
RUR ON HOME-TESTED V
SVA31c
SWIFT'S DRUG STORE
340 South State Street
The Rexall Store on the Campus

Adnan Khoja of Damascus-the
only Syrian student at the University
-is studying mechanical engineering
in order to help industrialize his
country.
Syria is predominantly an agri-
cultural country, Khoja explained in
an interview, although it does have
some canning factories and cement
works. "We are now planning to build
all kinds of industry," he said.
Money Stolen
Khoja graduated from high school
in Damascus at the age of 19, and
entered the University as a junior. A
CIO Con ventUin
Asks Industry
For W age Hike
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., Nov. 21
--UP)-The National CIO convention
called on American industry today
to grant "substantial wage increases"
this winter to meet advancing living
costs but President Philip Murray
immediately gave assurance "there is
no threat of strikes in the offing."
A 1,300-word resolution adopted by
the convention declared industry was
"running amok with ever advancing
prices" and said it was "imperative
that American industry in collective
bargaining give substantial wage in-
creases."
Secretary of Labor Lewis B. Schwel-
lenbach told the convention that real
weekly earnings of factory workers
had declined by 16.6 per cent between
April, 1945, and September, 1946, be-
cause of increases in prices of items
the workers must buy.
Schwellenbach suggested, however,
that "certain union leaders" might
pay attention to the economic "law of
diminishing returns," without elab-
orating on the statement.
Murray made it clear in a speech
that the CIO would fight for more
pay, but said "we're not running
around this country with a club in
our hands trying to beat the Ameri-
can people into submission."
Just before Murray spoke in sup-
port of the wage resolution, which
was passed unanimously by 600 dele-
gates, Walter Reuther, United Auto
Workers president, called for a CIO
"common wear chest" of $10,000,000
to $12,000,000 for the use by any
union in its fight for higher pay.
Other than the general terms of the
resolution, there was no indication
of just how much a "substantial"
wage increase would be. All CIO of-
ficials kept mum.
Reuther said in his speech support-
ing the resolution that the real wages
of American workers "depreciated"
20 per cent since January, 1945. He
told reporters later that figure was
not to be interpreted as a springboard
for auto workers' demands.
The convention was scheduled to
close tomorrow with the election of
officers. It appeared certain Murray
would be reelected as President and
that Reuther would be named one of
nine vice presidents.
Far East Study
Club Organized
The Far Eastern Journal Club, a
group for all those interested in the
Far East as an area for study, was
organized at a meeting Wednesday
in the Rackham Building.
Officers elected for the newly-
formed organization were Robin
Drews, chairman, Herold Wiens,
vice-chairman and Ralph Spielman,
secretary-treasurer.
"The purpose of the club is to pro-
vide an adequate outlet for student
research and to act as an integrat-
ing social factor in bringing together
all those interested in the Far East

as an area for study," Miss Drews
said. "We also hope to extend inter-
est in and develop on this campus an
adequate area study program for the
Far East," :she added.

high school English "professor" who
came. from Michigan persuaded
Khoja that the University was the
place for him. He came here a year
ago, by way of Port Said, Egypt, and
New York.
While Khoja was in Port Said, much
of the money which he was bringing
with him was stolen. Because money
cannot be sent out of Syria, his fa-
ther has sent him Damascan silks,
jewel boxes, Syrian copper ware, sil-
ver jewelry and other objects, which
Khoja is now trying to sell.
French in Syria
Speaking if the French in Syria,
Khoja described a period of almost
20 years during which the natives
constantly battled with the foreign-
ers. "Once the French threw a bomb
at the prison in Damascus," he said,
"and killed almost 2,000 people."
The Syrians fought the French
even in the city streets of Damascus,
he declared, although the natives had
few weapons. Students helped in the
fighting and worked in the hospitals.
Khoja worked as an assistant in one
of the Damascan hospitals.
Khoja's brother, Dr. Adwar Khoja,
is also in Ann Arbor, observing oper-
ating techniques at the University
Hospital,
OUT THAR
. .at the illage-
Dance .. .
The weekly Friday night dance at
West Lodge is scheduled for 8:30
p.m. today.
More girls have been promised from
Ann Arbor this week, the dance com-
mittee reports, while Jerry Edwards'
orchestra will again supply the music.
*' **
Record Concert...
At West Court, there will be a pro-
gram of classical recordings ar-
ranged by Weldon Wilson at 8 p.m.
The program will include the music
of Schubert, Mozart, and Franck.
Wilson has collected records over a
long period of years.
Coming Events . .
Another performance of Noel Cow-
ard's play, "Blithe Spirit," will be pre-
sented by the Little Theatre at 8
p.m. Saturday at West Lodge.
At West Court, there will be danc-
ing, bridge, and refreshments from 8
to 11:30 p.m. Saturday.
Business School
Sponsors Exhibit
The University business adminis-
tration school is sponsoring a busi-
ness machine and supply show to-
day in the Exhibit Rooms of the
Rackham Building.
Businessmen of the community and
students enrolled in the business ad-
ministration school. will be able to
witness the latest material advances
in their field.
J

The Veterans Administration is
expected to iecommend to the new
Congress that the ceilings governing
subsistence payments to veterans in
training be ncreased by approxi-
mately $100.
A release from the state Office of
Veterans' Affairs in Lansing says:
"Sources close to General Bradley on
the whole subject of training say that
the VA Administrator has made up
his mind that the present ban on
payments of subsistence to trainees
earning $200 a month or more has
worked a hardship in a sufficient
number of cases to justify new legis-
lation."
The ceiling which General Bradley
is expected to recommend to Congress
in the opening days of the new ses-
sion will be $300 instead of the cur -
rent $200 peak, according to this re-
lease.
The Veterans Administration has
no responsibility with respect to
veterans, disabled or otherwise,

who play football outside their
regularly scheduled courses in,
schools or colleges. The VA might,
however, allow additional compen-
sation for injury suffered by a dis-
abled trainee if the injury were a
result of the pursuit- of a course of
vocational rehabilitation under
Public Law 16 without fault on his
part.
** 'A
More than half a million veterans
entering schools and colleges during
September and October swelled the
national total of former GIs now in
training under Public Laws 16 and
346 to 1,292,693. In-training veter-
ans in Michi an now number 64,455.
Veterans e ceiving terminal leave
bonds can increase their value by us-
ing them to pre-pay their National
Service Life Insurance premiums,
according to VA insurance officials.
Pre-paid insurance earns the vet-
eran a three per cent per annum dis-
-- Today and Saturday --
VACATION FROM MARRIAGE
Robert Donat, Deborah Kerr
--- and --
'TIE MAN FROM OKLAHOMA
with Roy Rogers

- North Main Opposite Court House
-Ends Tonight --__
"SHADOWS OVER
CHINATOWN"
"TONTO BASIN OUTLAWS"
-- Sat., Sun., Mon. Only --
"GOD'S COUNTRY" and
"PERSONALITY KID"
News and Serial

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count, while interest on "leave" bonds
amounts to two and one-half per
cent. In most cases, according to the
VA, interest received on pre-paid
insurance offsets any advantage of
back-dating to a lower premium rate,
in addition to safe-guarding the vet-
eran's insurance needs against the
possibility of future low-earning pe-
riods.
* * *
Veterans may now authorize the
VA to deduct National Service Life
Insurance premiums from their dis-
ability pension, compensation, or off-
icer retirement benefits, which are
paid by the VA provided that the
amount is large enough to cover the
monthly premium.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
NOW

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Because, when youiruse Verichrome you're all set to
enjoy day-in-and-day-out picture taking at its best.

Kodak Verichrome-the film in the yellow box
CALKINS-FLETCHER Drug Stores
324 South State 818 South State

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RIDER'S
HOBBY SUPPLIES
302 South State Street

Prices Rolled Back!
Sale Still On Thru Saturday

l

UNWANTED HAIR
Permanently Removed!
Short wave method-Faster, Painless
Phone 6373
First National Bldg.

--..---

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12-13-14

Men's Work Shirts
Dungarees .
Sweat Shirts .

s ! j99C
* S S * 6 $1.473

'111

ADAM HATS
First in hat field to roll back the prices
$1.45

1
TOP OFF A FINE
EVENING AT 7'ppe
- HAMBURGERS
WITH THE "WOICKS"
CHILLI LUNCHES
DROP IN DURING ANY OF THESE HOURS
Weekdays 10:00 A.M. 'til 1:00 A.M.
Friday, Saturday 10:00 A.M.'til 1:30 A.M.

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Shirts and Shorts
All wool and part wool ...... .

I9C ea.

A-----#- LA---

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