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November 16, 1946 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE WCHIGA.N DAMP

SATURDA P, N(3VI:NMER IC, ,1940

1 1MIHGN AI

SATURDAY, NOVEMTIER IC. i~4fl

I

Taber Seeks
Payroll Slash
To Cot Budget
Forecasts for GOP
Senate Posts Made
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15 - (P) -
Rep. Taber (Rep., N. Y.), chairman-
to-be of the House Appropriations
Committee, called for a "meat axe"
today to lop 1,000,000 federal workers
from the payroll as a step toward a
$9,000,000,000 budget reduction.
Taber set the $9,000,000,000 saving
as a minimum objective for the fiscal
year starting next July 1. It may be
possible, he told a news conference,
to trim off more than that and to re-
capture some of the estimated $41,-
500,000,000 to be spent during the
year ending next June 30.
White Will Accept Position
Senator Wallace H. White of Maine
announced today he would accept
the position of Republican leader in
the new Senate if it is offered him
and predicted that Senator Robert
A. Taft of Ohio would be reelected
Steering Committee chairman.
White also forecast the choice of
Arthur H. Vandenberg of Michigan
as president p'ro tempore of the Sen-
ate when the Republicans take over
Jan. 3, and the retention of Kenneth
S. Wherry of Nebraska as party whip.
White, now minority leader, has
been regarded as a key man in a be-
hind-the-scenes rivalry for the ma-
jority leadership post. Taft, and to
some extent Wherry, have figured in
talk about the leadership post. White
made clear today that he wants it.
Spending C(ut Forecast
A cut of over $10,000,000 in gov-
ernment spending during the next
fiscal year was forecast by Senator
Taft, (Rep., Ohio) in a message to the
National Co-operative Milk Pro-
ducers' Federation.
Taft told the fedeiation, meeting in
St. Lo~iis, that he strongly believes
that "we can hold appropriations for
the year ending July 1, 1948, to not
more than $30,000,000000.'
Taber proposed the $9,000,000,00
reduction to accompany ,the 20 per
cent cut in personal income taxes
which the House Republican Steer-
ing Committee agreed upon yester-
day.
Cuts Would Hit
Field Workers
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15 -- (P) -
The Republicans are hollering "cut,
cut, cut!" government expenses, but
225,000 federal workers here don't
seem very worried.
And why not?
A Civil Service Commission offi-
cial, who asked that his name not be
used, today gave a reporter two rea-
sops for the seemingly indifferent
attitude.
1. Most taxpayers apparently think
that when someone says, as Rep.
Taber (Rep., N. Y.) did today, that
1,000,000 government workers will be
fired, this means Washington will
become a ghost town.
That's because, the Civil Service
man said, there is a nationwide er-
roneous impression that most federal
workers live here.
Actually, he said, there were in
September, 2,154,109 government
workers. Of these, 225,000 live in
Washington.
2. The percentage of Washington
dismissals may run even less, he said.
Washington is headquarters for
most agencies, and the records usu-
ally are kept here.

1

FROLICTIME-It's not Saturday night but it looks like bath-time. Pictured above is entire women's
swimming pool in Barbour Gym locker room. Two is a crowd here.

'37 Proposal
For Women's
Pool Revealed
Tucked away neatly in the files of
the Women's Athletic Association
under the letter 'P' is a proposal for
a new womens swimming pool. It is
dated October, 16, 1937.
The plan, which was originally
put forward to supplant the 52-
year-old crib in the locker room of
the Barbour Gymnasium, has been
revived in many quarters now that
the war is over.
The present pool being used by
women students of the University is
large enough to hold three medium-
sized billiard tables conveniently
spaced. As Dr. Laurie Campbell,
women's physical education super-
visor, put it:
"If you put more than 10 girls in
that pool at once, they'll drown each
other."
Actually The Daily tried a novel
experiment and put 15 girls in the
pool for purposes of taking the
picture (above). The girls didn't
drown each other, but it was pretty
close.
Latest estimates call for approxi-
mately $200,000 to build a new pool.
$10,125 has been raised toward it in
the past by different student activi-
ties including the J-Hop, Freshman
Frolic, Michigras and others.
The present pool, built in 1894, was
condemned in 1935 by a state board
as unfit for use. It has been operat-
ing since then by special permission
and has to be supervised so that only
a limited number of people can use it
each day.
Sigler To Hear
Budget Debate
Plans To Study Other
Government Functions
LANSING, Nov. 15-()-Declar-
ing he was going to "saturate myself
with everything pertaining to state
government," Governor-elect ' Kim
Sigler today set up headquarters here
Sigler said he planned to sit in on
many of the state budget hearings,
scheduled to start early in December,
and was "giving serious considera-
tion" to the selection of a state budget
director.
Sigler said, however, that he has
not decided whether to accept Gov-
ernor Kelly's offer to appoint one be-
fore the new term starts, so the new
administration might have a con-
trolling voice in the drafting of the
1946-47 state budget.
"I learned a long time ago that the
way to win lawsuits was to know
more than the other fellow," Sigler
said, explaining why he was setting
up an office now. "That's what I am
setting out to do now about state gov-
ernment and every department and
function in it."
Read and Use
The Daily Classifieds

LIGHT ON SITUATION:
Scientific Pa' t itugWill Aid
Work in Engineering Labs

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the last of a
series of three articles on the metal
processing department laboratories.
By JOHN CAMPBELL
The metal processing department
laboratories, recent recipients of
some fifty new machine tools, are un-
dergoing a revolutionary face-lift-
ing.
Previously darkened aisles and
working space' are being trans-
formed as each of the laboratories,
located in the south wing of the East
Engineering Building, receives fresh
paint applied according to a definite
scheme of illumination.
Laboratory walls are being paint-
ed in a gradually ascending scale of
illumination with light blue-green at
the base and a lighter green color at
the top. Ceilings have been painted
light green or buff, and the floors
will be completely covered with light
gray paint.
Effect on Work Quality
Prof. Orlan W. Boston, of the
metal processing department, believes
that the new painting scheme will re-
sult in tremendous improvement in
the illumination of the laboratories.
He emphasized that good illumina-
tion is important not only as a con-
trolling factor in the quality of work
produced, but also as a safety pre-
caution.
The machine tools themselves have
been dressed up for the occasion.
Ordinarily drab and bulky machines
have been converted to color-
ful and pleasant-appearing equip-
ment through the careful application
of focal and eye-rest colors, designed
to separate the operating parts of the
machinery from the stationary parts
and from the materials being fabri-
cated.
Following techniques developed in
industry during the war, department
workers have painted the bases of
all machines green, all moving parts
yellow, electrical connections red and
the working areas a buff color.
Prevention of Eye Fatigue
This formula, tested by wartime in-
dustry, proved valuable in decreas-
ing eye-fatigue and at the same time
increasing efficiency,, morale and
safety. In the metal processing de-
partment laboratories, the change is
expected to facilitate the study of the
operation of electric, hydraulic,
pneumatic and mechanical devices.
In an effort to modernize their
laboratories still further, the metal
processing department has abandoned
the old power transmission system
which utilized line shafting, belts and
ceiling pulleys to drive the machines.
Now each machine will draw its own
power supply from an electrical power
inlet.
Self-Contained Motors
Most of the old-type machines have
been sold to provide funds for the
installation of the new machine tools.
Each new machine tool has its own
self-contained electrical motor. These
motors range in power capacity from
two or three to twenty horsepower.
Many of the machines have more

than one motor and up to five or six.
In many cases it was necessary for
department workers to install trans-
formers to step up the regular volt-
age supplied by the University. Some
machines are now idle because of the
difficulty of obtaining transformers.
"The job is not yet completed,"
Prof. Boston said, "but many re-
turning grads are surprised and
pleased to see that the opportunity
created only by a world war has been
taken advantage of to such an extent
as to provide an abundance of the
latest type of machinery for the en-
gineering student.'
Church ews
Activities of interguild student re-
ligious groups will include open
houses and a wienie roast today.
Following the football game, the
WESTMINSTER GUILD will hold a
wienie roast on the church grounds.
A Novelty Night will be presented
by the CONGREGATIONAL-DISCI-
PLES GUILD at 8:30 p.m. at the Con-
gregational Church.
Lyle Allbright, musician, will en-
tertain during the floorshow. Danc-
ing and games also will be included in
the program.
Tax Form Requires
Div idenzd Statemen t
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15-(A')-
Corporations will have to state on
their income tax returns for 1946
whether they failed, to pay out at
least 70 per cent of their earnings in
dividends, and if so, why.
That became official today with
release of samples of the new cor-
porate return forms, but revenue
officials declared reassuringly that
this did not foreshadow any attempt
to crack down on firms accumulat-
ing funds for "reasonable needs of
the business.'
The requirement that corporations
"state reasons for retention" of more
than 30 per cent of their earnings or
profits was a reminder of a long-
standing act which lapsed into ob-
scurity during the war.
Coats To Speak Monday
John B. S. Coats, wartime president
of the Theosophical Society in Eng-
land, will speak on "The New Age
and Ancient Truths" Monday, under
the sponsorship of the Theosophical
Society of Ann Arbor.

Reserve Board
Suspends Most
Credit Controls
WASHINGTON, Nov. 5-()-The
Federal Reserve Board tonight
scrapped all controls over consumer
2redit, effective Dec. 1, except re-
strictions on installment buying of 12
durable goods in short supply, in-
cluding automobiles, radios and fur-
niture.
Wiped out in the face of an im-
pending Christmas buying boom will
be requirements that charge ac-
counts be repaid within 70 days, and
that single-payment loans-those re-
payable in a lump sum-be settled up
within 90 days.
Work Out Own Terms
With the exception of credit for
the 12 specified items, lenders and
borrowers and sellers and buyers will
be free for the first time in over five
years to work out their own terms.
The 12 articles on which controls
will be maintained were listed as:
Automobiles, refrigerators, cooking
stoves and ranges, washing machines,
ironers, diswashers, air conditioners,
radios and phonographs, sewing ma-
chines, vacuum cleaners, furniture
and soft-surface floor coverings.
A down payment of one-third will
continue to be required on the first
ten in that list, while the 20 per
cent down payment requirement will
be continued in effect for furniture
and floor coverings.
Repayment Deadline
However, the repayment deadline
was set for 15 months on all new in-
stallment credits on the 12 articles.
Previously the 15 month credit had
been applicable only for automobiles
while all other goods had carried a
12-month deadline.
The revisio of controls also sim-
plified credit procedure, eliminating
the requirement that a statement of
the transaction be givento the cus-
tomer.
In announcing the relaxation, the
board indicated that further action
of the kind would be forthcoming
later, declaring "when present in-
flationary pressures have subsided,
the terms of the regulation would
need to be modified further."
Prosperity Is
Seen by Small
Restraint by Labor,
Management Urged
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15-(AP)-Ci-
vilian Production Administrator
John D. Small declared today that
only runaway prices or major work
stoppages could stop the nation's
progress toward record prosperity.
"Both can be avoided if manage-
ment and labor use restraint, common
sense and good judgment," Small
told management representatives of
the syntheticrubber industry.
Speaking at an Industry Safety
and Fire Conference sponsored by
the Office of Rubber Reserve, Small
declared that "we do not really have
to have a depression-or recession
or dip-unless we insist upon it.
"Our population has increased five
and one half per cent since 1941, and
we have about 13,500,000 more people
employed than in 1941."
UNWANTED HAIR
Permaniently Removed!
Short wave method-Faster, Painless
Phone 6373
First National Bldg.

BUY A
Britannica
Encyclopedia
NOW!
while it can be of
greatest help to you.
Call BOB GELSTON
Phone 7492

(HOW ABOUT YOU?)

K ILROY

WAS HERE

I

YOU ALL. ..
come to METZGER'S for s
wonderful fried chicken se
with real Southern hospitality
SHE WON'T
HANGUP.
when you say, "let's dine at
PARROTT." We serve everyt
from an afternoon coke to a
dinner.
Y
TAKE
YOUR DATE .. .
to the BROWN JUG at any
We serve delicious meals from
A.M. to 1:00 P.M. and from
7 P.M. daily except Sunday.
,
_ o .

SHE'LL BE

tN '1
ROUGH
PAT.
OFF.

I

s

YOU'LL
FEEL AT HOME ...
in the friendly atmosphere of
SMITH'S dining room. Try us for
one of our many varieties of fish,
chicken, or steak.
the
thing
steak

DON'T BE

A

A A

I-

RIDER'S
STUDENT SUPPLIES
302 South State Street

A DUNCE.,..
Why worry about your meals and
your budget? TOPPERS, 306 S.
Division can answer your problem
with those hard-to-get hamburg-
ers. Come in and take advantage
of our reasonable prices.
time.
7:00
5 to
21
FOR
A REAL TREAT.
stop in at the GRANADA
CAFE, for new atmosphere and
a choice selection of appetite
quenchers. Good service, reason-
able prices, and friendly spirit will
make your meal more enjoyable.

p

1' 'I

&4
Why Wait? Get Your
CHRISTMAS CARDS
W. 4
5c each . . . 50c dozen
NO1.1lOc each . . $1.00dozen
TO ADD COLOR TO THE HOLIDAYS .. .
AN EXCELLENT CHOICE OF STICKERS... 4

i

i

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