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November 16, 1946 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-16

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BAGE TWO
Arbitration Agreement Ends
Strike by TWA Airline Pilots

Tm MICHIG~AN 14A IT.'

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1946

________________11____________- .L .'.'-i. . 11 .x"1 \ .A ' L..A1X . SA u vRDaY. NO fr~~VMBrE. R 1G. 194

9

WASHINGTON, Nov. 15- (P) -
The global strike of Transworld Air-
lines ended today with agreement to
arkitrate and its first flights since.
October 21 were posted for tomor-
row.
However, it may be December 1
before the line's 28,000 miles of routes
in three continents are back in full
operation.
Reduced Schedules
TWA said 16 schedules will be
flown tomorrow, compared to a nor-
mal list of 90. The first flight will
leave"'Detroit at 7-:15 a.m. for Chi-
Assistant Chief
of U.S. Mission
Named Plotter
LONDON, Nov. 15- (P) - Soviet
dispatches quoted the chief defen-'
dant in an Albanian sabotage trial
as naming the assistant chief of the
withdrawing United States mission to
Tirana as the master mind of a ring
of plotters who spread rumors of an
impending Greek-Albanian war and
a British-American invasion.
A Tass dispatch quoted Abdul
Sharra as testifying in his own de-
fense that the plotters also planned
to wreckt the Lake Malik drainage
project, an undertaking in the Coriz-
za area near the point of the Alban-
ian, Yugoslav and Greek borders.
Newspapers in the Yugoslav capi-
tal of Belgrade said the American
mission headed-by George D. Hender-
son, left Albania today aboard an
American warship which was not al-
lowed to enter a Yugoslav port. The
party, ending its sixteen months fruit-
less mission of gathering informa-
tion relative to United States recogni-
tion of the government of Gen. Enver
Hoxha, was taken in small boats to
the warship anchored six miles out-
side the port of Drach (Durazzo)
The United States announced this
week that it was withdrawing the
mission, negotiating on recognition
of the Hoxha government having
broken down over Albania's refusal
to honor treaties made with the
United States prior to 1939.
Sanitation Meeting
To Convene Nov. 2Q
The University School of Public
Health will hold the second annual
meeting of the National Sanitation
Foundation, Nov. 20.
Speakers and their subjects will
inc,144e: President Alexander G.
Ruthven, "Role and Responsibility of
the University"; Prof. Nathan Sinai,
of the School of Public Health, "Re-
search in Sanitation"; and, Thomas
M. Rector, vice-president in charge
of the research division of the Gen-
eral Foods Corporation, "Research in
Industry."
North Main Opposite Court House
Starts Today
EDDIE DEAN in
"COLORADO SERENADE"
- plus -
LLOYD HUGHES in
"NIGHT CARGO"
Late News and Serial No. 10
WUEIITIH
Last Day Today ---
"THE BLACK ANGEL"
with Dan Duryea
June Vincent
-and--

"UNDER FIESTA STARS"
with Gene Autry
Starts Sunday
"A STOLEN LIFE"
and--
"THE MAN WHO DARED"

-ago; other initial flights will take
off from New York, Boston, Wash-
ington, Chicago, Kansas City, Los
Angeles and San Francisco.
The first overseas flight will come
in mid-morning, taking off from New
York for Paris.
Nearly nine hours of steady talking,
ending at 4:12 a.m. CST, were need-
ed to get the arbitration agreement
into mutually acceptable form.
Agreement Signed
At that hour, in the office of Chair-
man Frank P. Douglass of the Na-
tional Mediation Board, company
and union representatives signed an
agreement to submit the dispute over
>ay and working rules to a three-man
arbitration board.
The strike grounded 115 planes,
shrew nearly 15,000 non-striking em-
ployes out of work along with 1,000
pilots and cut off $2,000,000 a week
in revenue.
Several factors militate against
immediate resumption of full opera-
tions. One is that many pilots are
now far from the places where they
left their runs. Another is that the
task of taking reservations has t
been resue.
Findings. Become Contrast
The three-man board is granted
full power to decide the issues, its
findings to become a contract ef-
fective until January 31, 1948.
Salary demands by the striking
pilots of four-engine planes ranged
as high as $15,000 a year. The com-
pany estimates the present top pay
at $12,000.
soft Coal Strie
Called by Leis
For tWednesday
(Continued from Page 1)
Lewis then carried out his original
threat to declare his contract with
the government terniinated, and
served afive-day notice for this pur-
pose. The deadline on this is Wednes-
day midnight, and the 400,000 bitu-
minous miners traditionally do not
work without a contract-hence the
prospective strike.
The Smith-Connally Act forbids
anyone to promote astrike in a gov-
ernment-seized industry.
The President's statement noted
that Lewis had demanded on Nov. 1
that his contract be reopened for
wage adjustments "in the face of"
the circumstances that " the nation
has not yet recovered from the long
and costly coal strike of last spring."
* *.
Cong ress' Aid
May Be Sought
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15- (A)
Sen. Capehart (Rep., Ind.), proposed
tonight that President Truman call
a special session of Congress if the
soft coal dispute with Jhn L. Lewis
is not settled "within a reasonable
amount of time."
His statement did not specify what
action Congress should take, but said
that if the President, "representing
the government of the United States,
is unable to handle this difficulty
with John L. Lewis, then the Con-
gress, representing the people, will
have to take it in hand."
Any special session would bring
back to the capitol the members of
the' 79th Congress, and not the
newly-elected Congress which the
Republicans will control.
Sen. Bridges (Rep., N.H.) told re-
porters he doubts "that a lame duck
Congress with the Democrats still in
control could do anything effective"
and expressed doubt that Mr. Tru-
man would want to call a special
session.

On the House side, Rep. Clarence
Brown jRep., Ohio) said that a bit-
uminous strike "will be a catastrophe
for the nation. It is just another
example of New Deal chickens com-
ing home to roost."

Highlights
On Campus
Scientists Will Meet . .
The Association of University of
Michigan Scientists will meet at 8
p.m. Monday in the East Conference
Room of the Rackham Building.
In accordance with a plan proposed
at the group's October meeting, the
purpose of the meeting Monday will
be to organize discussion groups.
Under the proposed program, the
Association will split up into small
groups to study specific topics and
will hold meetings of the whole less
frequently.
Economics Club .:.
The Economics Club will meet at
8:00 p.m. Monday in Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Prof. Robert S. Ford, of the
economics department, will discuss
"Recent Developments in Taxa-
tion in Michigan."
Hillel Open House ..
The B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
will hold an open house following
the game today.
National Park Films .,.
Frank Lennox, Ann Arbor's -color
photographer, will show movies of
our western nationals parks at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow in the International
Center.
During the ten years that color
photography has been his hobby,
Lennox has made 30 trips across
the continent and has photo-
graphed every national park in the
United States and Canada.
The films to be shown tomorrow,
some of which were taken this
year, are of Glacier Park in Mon-
tana, and Teton and Yellowstone
National Parks in Wyoming.
Refreshments will be served fol-
lowing the movies. The program is
open to the public.
French Club Meeting -. -
"Le Cercle Francais" will meet at 8
p.m. Monday in Rm. 305 of the Union.
At the meeting, the picture for the
'Ensian will be taken, and there will
be new French songs and games. Prof.
Charles Koella, director of the group,
has urged all members to attend.

Laborite Rebels,
Plan Debate on
Bevin s Policies
LONDON, Nov. 15 - (A) - Labor-
ite rebels decided today to carry their
fight against the policies of Foreign
Secretary Ernest Bevin into the
House of Commons in a gloves-off
debate, but there appeared no doubt
that the government would win a
thumping expression of confidence
if the issue came to a vote.
Acting after the speaker of the
house ruled that their amendment to
the King's speech from the throne
at the opening of Parliament could be
discussed, the more than 50 objec-
tors drafted plans to subject what
they called "Bevinism" to full debate
Monday.
They are demanding that Britain
pursue a "socialist" foreign policy in
order to avoid what they call an "in-
evitable" conflict between Russia and
the United States under the present
British policy.
Most parliamentary observers ex-
pected the anti-Bevinites to confine
their campaign strictly to debate.

By HELENE RICH
The University Bureau of Public
Health Economics, providing services
for this community and the nation, is
the only organization of its kind in
the country.
One of the bureau's most important
Business Machines
Will Be Exhibited
The School of Business Adminis-
tration will sponsor a business ma-
chine and supply exhibit Nov. 21 and
22 in the Exhibit Rooms of the Rack-
ham Building.
Twenty-five national business sup-
ply companies will exhibit Ml types
of business machines and other of-
fice supplies at the show. The pur-
pose of the display is to enable
business administration students to
see the latest materials in their field
and to offer a service to local busi-
nessmen.
The Exhibit Rooms will be open
daily from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and
on Friday from 7 to 9 p.m.

UNIQUE ORGANIZATION:
Health Economics Bureau Serves Nation

functions is the publication of the
bulletin, "Public Health Economics,"
a monthly compilation of events and
opinions. From more than 600 publi-
cations arriving during' the month-
labor papers, hospital journals, and
all types of bulletins that would give
representative views- articles are
digested to present a concise and ac-
curate picture of public health
trends.
Compulsory Health Insurance
Typical subject matter covered by
"Public Health Economics" includes
information on various bills for com-
pulsory health insurance introduced'
in Congress and state legislatures,
governmental programs now in oper-
ation, such as that of the Veteran's
Administration, and reports on the
voluntary prepayment plans in op-
eration throughout the country.
Mrs. Dorothy Buffington, techni-
cal assistant at the bureau, explained
that the bulletin's circulation is not
very large since it iscomparatively
new, started in Sept., 1944. However,
it is sent to all parts of the country
and is widely circulated abroad. "Its

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

t

Publication in The Daily Official Bul-
letin is constructive notice to all mem-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent in typewritten
form to the office of the Assistant to the
President, Room 1021 Angell Hall, by 3:00
p.m. on the day preceding publication
(11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1946
VOL. LVII, No. 47
Notices
All Navy V-5 students will report
to NROTC, North Hall at earliest op-
portunity regarding information nec-
essary for payment of tuition, fees,
etc.
Faculty College of Literature, Sci-
ence, and the Arts: Midsemester re-
ports are due not later than Monday,
Nov. 18.

Report cards are being distributed
to all departmental offices. Green
cards are being provided for fresh-
men and sophomores and white cards
for reporting juniors and seniors.
Reports of freshmen and sophomores
should be sent to 108 Mason Hall;
those of juniors and seniors to 1220
Angell Hall.
Midsemester reports should name
those students, freshmen and upper-
classmen, whose standing at mid-
semester is "D" or "E", not merely
those who receive "D" or "E" in so-
called mid-semester examinations.
Students electing our courses, but
registered in other schools or col-
leges of the University should be
reported to the school or college in
which they are registered.
Additional cards may be had at
108 Mason Hall or at 1220 Angell
Hall.
E. A. Walter

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING_

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Gold prepellep tie clip, vicinity of
campus. Sentimental value. Finder
please call Bud, 2-1341. )3
LOST: Lehman High School ring. Ploase
return to Norman Jackson, Business Of-
fice, University Hall. )22
LOST: Glasses, Nov. 6th, either in Chem.
Bldg., N. S. Bldg., or between. St. Louis
address on case. Cali 8495 after 8 p.m.)12
LOST: Gym gear and beautiful hand-knit
Argyle sox which have sentimental val-
ue. Fred Palmer, Phone 5333.)9
LOST: One brown pocketbook wallet con-
taining $60.00. Please return to Helen
House, Sorosis, Washtenaw, Ann Arbor.
$10.00 reward. )86
LOST: A football, left at Wines Field after
the speedball game Wednesday night.
Please dial 2-4481. Reward. ' )16
WILL PERSON who exchanged raincoats,
Michigan Union Barber Shop, Friday,
Nov. 8, please call 8595. )13
PERSON removing by mistake gray Covert
Topcoat from Bus. Ad. Library coatracx
Thursday afternoon please return to 103
Adams House. )2
LOST: Diamond ring with great sentimen-
tal value, between E. Med. and State St.
Nov. 12. Reward to finder. Call Frances
Don, 2-3119. )69
LOST: Parker "51' pen. Grey barrel, stain-
less steel cap. Reward. Call C. R. Lectka,
Ypsi 9268, after 6 p.m. )1
LOST: K & E slide rule, black case. Name,
B. W. Wilterdink on inside of case flap.
Phone 6284. Reward. )10
LOST: Black Shaeffer pen and pencil set.
Name engraved on set: Gladys Fisher.
Finder please call 2-4096 after 6 p.m.
Reward. )5
LOST: Ladies handbag, left in Oldsmobile
of law student. Please call 3560-W-2, 1605
Monson Ct., Willow Run. )6
FOR SALE
1 PAIR, twice worn, saddle color, square-
toe, British Walkers, women's shoes, 6%
A. Box 5, Michigan Daily. )4
MIDWAY Bicycle shop, 322 E. Liberty. We
have rebuilt used bikes for sale. Your
bike can be expertly repaired also. )56
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A better
price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. , )14
1'

HELP WANTED
WANTED TO HIRE: Full or part-time
waitresses. Hours 4 p.m. until 12 p.m.
Willow Run Bowling Alley. Phone 1852..
) 74
We Have Openings
For Girls
WHO CAN WORK DAY HOURS
DURING THE FIVE WEEK
'TAINING PERIOD AND
LATER BE ASSIGNED THE
FOLLOWING HOURS:
4:00 P.M. to 10:30 P.M.
4:30 P.M. to 11:00 P.M.
5:00 P.M. to 11:30 P.M.
5:30 P.M.to MIDNIGHT
YOU MAY TELEPHONE TO
INQUIRE ABOUT THIS
BETWEEN 8 A.M. AND 5 P.M.
CALL OUR EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
NUMBER 9900
Michigan Bell

WANTED TO RENT
ROOM WANTED: TEN DOLLARS reward
for information leading to rental of
room in Ann Arbor suitable for two
veteran students. Contact Box 89, Mich-
igan Daily. )77
WANTED TO RENT: Need a new car? Vet-
eran and wife willing to sacrifice theirs
for information leading to the securing
of a satisfactory apartment by February.
Contact Michigan Daily Box 83. )11
WANTED
WANTED: Two tickets for Ohio State
game. Call Bud Wolin, 8935. ) 62
$10 REWARD for information leading to
room reasonably near campus, for male
graduate student during Spring and
subsequent-terms. Box 15, Daily. )19
GRADUATE STUDENT (woman) desires
single room near campus for next sem-
ester. Box 80. )20
BUSINESS SERVICES
PHOTOSTATIC COPYING : Discharges,
Drawings, Papers, Enlargements or Re-
ductions. Leave your work at Calkins-
Fletcher, purchase Radio, Mail or bring
to Technical Photo Service, 917 Sunry-
side, Ann Arbor. )8C
TYPING: theses, term papers, addresses,
etc. Duplicating: notices, form letters,
programs, menus. A-2 Typing Service,
232 Nickels Arcade, phone 9811. )17
CHUMLEE'S
FREE DELIVERY of your favorite sand-
wiches and beverages. Every day 'but
Monday. 6 p.m. to 2 a.m.- Phone 2-6429.
)8
TAILORING and SEWING
ALTERATIONS and refitting of dresses
and formals. New skirts made to mea-
sure. Nothing in black. Miss Livingston,
315 S. Division, 2nd Floor Front. )25

Students, College-, of Literature,
Science and the Arts: Applications
for scholarships for ,the year, 1947-
48, should be made before Nov. 23.
Application forms may be obtained
at 1220 Angell Hall- and should be
filed at that office.
Recreational Swiniming: Women
students may use the Michigan Union
pool for recreational swimming on
Tuesday and ThursIdy evenings from
7:30 to 8:20 until the end of the first
semester. The usual ,-fee will be
charged.
All Women Physical . Education
classes which meet regularly on Tues-
day and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., will
meet at 7:10 p.m., Tues., Nov. 19, in
Barbour Gymnasium.
Petitions for admission to the
Combined Curriculum in Letters and
Law are again being accepted from
out-of-state students. Prospective
applicants who have begun the first
semester of their junior year may ap-
ply for admission to the program pro-
vided petitions are filed with the
Chairman of the Committee, 1220
Angell Hall, not later than April 19,
1947. Prospective applicants are re-
ferred to a description of the curric-
ulum on pages 38-39 of the'current
Announcement of the College of Lit-
erature, Science and the Arts.
February Seniors and Graduates in
Mechanical and Aeronautical Engi-
neering: Mr. R. MacDonald, repre-
senting Chance Vough Aircraft of
Stratford, Connecticut, will be here
for interviews, on- Fri., Nov. 22, Rm.
B-47, E. Engineering. For interview',
sign schedule on Aeronautical Engi-
neering Bulletin Board.
Wanted: A man with some law
training to handle real estate work
in Detroit with a large international
corporation. For further information,
call at the office of The Bureau of
Appointments and Occupational In-
formation, 201 Mason Hall.
Counselors for Eastern Camp
Wanted: We have an immediate call
for counselors from an eastern camp
for summer work in the Catskills
and the Adirondacks. Please see Mrs.
Mantle at THE BUREAU OF AP-
POINTMENTS AND OCCUPATION-
AL INFORMATION,-201 Mason Hall.
Our regular registration for summer
jobs will not be held. until February.
(Continued on Page 3)
Lur

value," she said, "has been discerned,
if one observes its range of distribu-
tion."
Research Activities
Research work, especially a recent
study of the EMIC program, (Emer-
gency Maternity and Infant Care), is
another important bureau function.
Originally, servicemen's wives were
treated through Army hospitals, but
the service grew too large for the
Army medical staff to handle and
funds were obtained from the Chil-
dren's Bureau of the Department of
Labor to set up the EMIC program.
The bureau made a study of this in
eight states, which will be published.,-
in a few months.
Administrative problems are also
considered, as shown in the recent
study of the Washington State Old
Age Assistance Program. Washing-
ton has the most complete social se-
curity system in the United States,
Mrs. Buffington said. It provides the
old age recipient with all medical
care, including glasses and dentistry.
Basis for National Program
If the national government should
ever consider adopting a similar pro-
gram, it would be to Washington
State to which it would look for the
solution of administrative problems,
and the bureau's study would cover
just that aspect of the program, she
explained.
The Hill-Burton Hospital Con-
struction Bill provided for many hos-
pitals to be built where they are
needed, with the national govern-
ment matching state funds. These
hospitals will need trained adminis-
trators, and it is the bureau's func-
tion to train people to fill such posi-
tions, she continued. In the recent
conference on Preventive Medicine
and Health Economics, teachers from
medical schools discussed the ad-
visability of teaching administrative
and clinical methods to medical stu-
dents. It was generally agreed that
such phases of medical care were
lacking in any medical curriculum.
Read and Use
The Daily Classi/eds
'Dine in the Charming
Early American Atmosphere
THE of
T'HECOLONIAL ROOM
11:30-1:30 LUNCH
5:30-8:30 DINNER
12:00-8:30 SUNDAY
Featuring Rupert Otto
at the New Organ
J ~ Give yourStudent Parties
in our
S PrivateDining Rooms
Call 26544 ,
for Reservations
Half block west of State Street
ON EAST HURON C
TMICHIGAN
Last Times ToniteI

Telephone

Co.

STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Sold, Rented, Repaired
0. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

JACKIE -"Butch" JENKINS
James CRAIG . Skippy HOMEIER
Shows at 7:00 and 9:06

323 E. WASHINGTON ST.

) 15

LAST JANE RUSSELL
TIMES
TODAY! "THE OUTLAW"

HELP WANTED: Boys to work Saturday
and Sunday, 1-6, or 6-11. Setting pins at
an hourly rate. Apply at Ann Arbor
Recreation, or phone 2-0103. )18
TRANSPORTATION
TO CONNECTICUT or New York City. Will
share expenses and driving for ride
about December 21. Call 2-5553, Room
138, Buzz 3. )24

I

STARTS SUNDAY

I

r

""'"""

Continuous
Daily
from 1 P.M.

A N EWFrF. A'

Zl~cchnhiivinq

Weekdays
30c to 5 P.M.

go

RIDER'S
HOBBY SUPPLIES
302 South State Street

AT THE MICHIGAN LEAGUE

in the ain dining root

I

THE ART CINEMA LEAGUE PRESENTS
SYLVIA DOSTOEVSKY'S IMMORTAL CLASSIC
SIDNEY
Clever and 1 "CRIME AND
Smart!PIME N
PUNI S H MEcN T

RESERVATIONS will be taken for only two seatings:
12:30 P.M.. . .2:00 P.M.
You must have a reservation.
NO CANCELLATIONS will be accepted after 4:00 P.M.
Wednesday, November 27th
II I I

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