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November 15, 1946 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-15

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

]FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1946

PAGE TWO rRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1946

New Equipment To Improve
Courses in Metal Processing

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second of
a series of three articles on the metal
processing department laboratories.
The large variety of new equip-
ment received by the metal pro-
cessing department will make it
possible to improve and extend
courses coordinating design, mater-
ials and manufacturing methods,
Prof. Orlan W. Boston said yester-
day.
Prof. Boston referred to the addi-
tion of some fifty, slightly used, ma-
chine tools presented to the depart-
nmient by the U.S. Army Ordnance
Department during the summer and
fall.
Much of the new equipment has
now been installed in the metal pro-
cessing laboratories located in the
south wing of the East Engineering
Building. Total value of the new
County Lowers
Murder Charge
Against Dunn
Prosecutor John W. Rae today
agreed to lower the County's charges
against Brent H. Dunn from first de-
gree murder to involuntary man-
slaughter because of the difficulties
involved in recalling witnesses for
the13 year old murder of John Rine-
hart, 67 year old Ann Arbor recluse.
"Since many of our witnesses have
passed away or moved, the pursuance
of this case would involve un-
waranted expense to the state and
the county," Rae said.
Judge Joseph F. Sanford, of Mus-
kegon, acting circuit judge in the
absence of Judge James R. Breakey,
Jr., sentenced Dunn to six months to
15 years in prison today in Wash-
tenaw Circuit Court after the pros-
ecutor's agreement to the charge of
manslaughter.
Dunn will be returned to the
Jackson State Prison pending inves-
tigation of his case by the State Pa-
role Board. He had served 13 years
of a life sentence for the old murder
charge before his request for a new
trial was granted.

equipnient has been placed at about
a quarter of a million dollars.
Extensive Courses
Prof. Boston declared that the
courses in- production engineer g
offered here are more extensive than
those of most schools. For evidence
to support thisclaim, he pointed to
the large number of graduate stu-
dents being sent to Michigan by
other countries to study in this field.
"Since our purpose is one of teach-
ing basic principles underlying pro-
duction, not of production itself,"
he said, "we are not interested in
obtaining duplicates of one type of
machine. It has been our aim to ob-
tain as many different types of ma-
chine tools as possible in order to
illustrate several methods of design
and production by which it is possible
to produce component parts."
Many manufacturers of machine
tools have voluntarily presented the
metal processing department with
types of machines which the depart-
ment did not possess in order to fur-
ther complete the representative ar-
ray of equipment now available in
the laboratories.
Record Enrollment
Addition of the vast quantity of
new equipment was well-timed. The
metal processing department is faced
this term with an enrollment 60 per
cent greater than last spring and
more than twice the enrollmeast of
any term previous to that of last
spring.
In order to accommodate the tre-
mendous enrollment the departmient
has been forced to schedule a total
of 33 night class hours a week, in
addition to regularly scheduled class-
es.
Laboratory Periods
Metal Processing 2, required of all
engineers, has been most affected by
the large enrollment. At the present
time 31 three-hour laboratory sec-
tions for this course, dealing with
forging, welding and heat-treating of
steel, are scheduled. The laboratory
periods extend from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
frequently overlapping each other.
A total of 21 recitation sections are
now taught in this course, seven of
them in the evening.

Church News
Student religious groups will hold
open houses and plan special pro-
jects today.
Thanksgiving and Christmas fav-
ors for the tuberculosis ward of the
University Hospital will be made
during the Service Night of the
WESLEYAN GUILD at 8:30 p.m. in
the Wesleyan Lounge.
Mary Burton and Ed Davis are co-
chairman for the program which
will include making cartoon
and crossword puzzle scrap books
and packing food and clothing for
overseas relief..
Admittance will be magazines, car-
toons, puzzles and answers, small
toys and games. Refreshments and
group singing will conclude the pro-
gram.
The young married couples of the
ROGER WILLIAMS GUILD will
have a potluck supper at 5:30 p.m.
at the Guild House.
At 8:30 p.m. there will be a stu-
dent reception at the First Baptist
Church for all Guild members. The
reception is an annual event at which
students of the Guild and members of
the church meet together.
An Old Fashioned Box Social will
be given by the LUTHERAN STU-
DENT ASSOCIATION at 8 p.m. at
the student center.
The NEWMAN CLUB will hold an
open house from 8 p.m. to midnight
at St. Mary's Chapel..
Membership cards will be distrib-
uted at the meeting.
* * *
An open house will be given by the
CANTERBURY CLUB from 4 to 6
p.m. at the Student Center.
"Football Finale Frolic" will be
the theme of the program to be given
by GAMMA DELTA, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, at 8:15 p.m.
Members of the Faith Workshop,
sponsored by the Student Religious
Association, will attend services at
the B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUN-
DATION at 7:45 p.m. today.
Rabbi Herschel Lymon will deliver
a sermon "Guide to the Perplexed,"
and the Hillel Student Choir will
sing during the services.

Michigan igh
School Stfdents
To Confer ere
Approximately 100 Michigan high
school students are expected to at-
tend the Conference for officers of
high school student councils which
is being held here today.
Sponsored by the University Ex-
tension Service, the education school,
and the Ann Arbor High Schools, the
Conference will consider the prob-
lem of making student councils ef-
fective in citizenship training.
Dr. Virgil Rogers, superintendent of
schools at Battle Creek, will address
the morning session. The remain-
der of the day will be given over to
student discussion groups.
Topics to be discussed include pro-
moting participation by high school
students 'in worthwhile community
projects, the relationship between
faculty, administration, and student
council, and why student councils
fail.
The Conference is an outgrowth of
a study of citizenship training in the
public schools, conducted last year
by the University under a grant from
the Daughters of the Ames ican Rev-
olution.
New Lot Doubles
'U' Parking Space
A new restricted parking lot is now
under construction between West
Engineering Annex and South Uni-
versity, which will double the exist-
ing parking space for University
parking permit holders, Walter M.
Roth, plant service superintendent
announced yesterday.
A sidewalk and a foot high concrete
wall bounding the parking area are
also being constructed.

orkers' Educational Bureau
Utilized by 40,000 Annually

Approximately 40,000 people are en-
rolled each3 year in classes and lec-
tures conducted by the Workers'
Educational Service, according to Dr.
Charles A. Fisher, director of the
University Extension Service.
Workers' Educational Service pro-
vides classes, discussion groups, film
forums, conferences, or community
forums on subjects of interest to lo-
cal unions, industrial union councils,
or groups of unorganized workers.
Established in 1944 as part of the
Michigan Experimental Program in
Adult Education, WES is financed by
Co;nerence
0-f etil Men
A conference dealing wtih the prob-
lems facing retailers at the present
time will be held Wednesday after-
noon in the Rackham Building, co-
sponsored by the School of Business
Administration and the Detroit Con-
trollers' Group.
Following registration at 2:30, a
welcoming address will be given by
Dean Russell A. Stevenson of the
business administration school.
Other addresses scheduled for the
conference include "Problems of the
Small Store" by Senator James T.
Milliken, president of a Traverse City
department store; "Tomorrow's Prob-
lems of Department and Specialty
Stores," by Prof. E. H. Gault, Direc-
tor of the Bureau of Business Re-
search of the business administra-
tion school; and "Tax Problems of
Retailers," by Mr. Otis Cook, Execu-
tive Secretary, Michigan Retail In-
stitute, Lansing.

an appropriation made by the Michi-
gon Legislature and is administered
through the University Extension
Service.
Courses Non-credit
All courses are non-credit and are
conducted at the Rackham Building
in Detroit. Tuition fees are very
small.
Courses offered include collective
bargainine, parliamentary procedure,
union administration, union counsel-
ing, radio, effective speech, state and
federal labor legislation, economics,
contemporary social problems, home
and family living, social recreation
leadership, social philosophies, jour-
nalism, and time study.
Provides Films
WES also provides organizations
with trained lecturers, discussion
leaders, and films on topics of the
groups' choosing. Popular subjects
include unemployment compensation,
current labor legislation, consumer
problems, collective bargaining, and
labor history.
The Service has the entire film li-
brary of the University at its dis-
posal. It also produces film strips and
other visual education materials.
Graduate Council to
Hold Mixer Tonight
Bridge, dancing to records and re-
freshments will be featured at the
Graduate Student Council Mixer be-
ing held from 8:30 p.m. to midnight
today in the Rackham Building.
The council invites all graduate
students and faculty members to at-
tend.

OUT THAR
at the Village
EDITOR'S NOTE: Items for this col-
umn are compiled and written by stu-
dent veterans of Willow Village.
If it's a big ti e you're looking for,
Lodger, then look no farther, 'cause
that big time can be had right at
the village. Another bigger and bet-
ter Friday night dance will be held
tonight in the ballroom of West
Lodge. Back again with his own ex-
cellent brand of music is Jerry Ed-
wards, who'll combine the sweet with
the hot for your dancing pleasure.
Intermission won't be just a time to
rest your feet, it'll be the time for an-
other good floor show. Heading the
entertainment bill will be Jackie
Ward, the lovely vocalist of WWJ,
Detroit. She's promised to give out
with a few vocals that will have that
ol' magic in them, so, you see, you
can't go wrong at this dance.
Lodger, if you miss it this Friday,-
well, all I can say is, "You'll be sor-
ry." *
Law Students
Honor 15 Men
The Law School Barristers Society,
complete with black robes and white
wigs, initiated 15 senior law students
in a traditional ceremony.
Outstanding members of the senior
class who were honored include:
Howard Jacobs, Harry Denler,
Horace Tinker, Edwin Uhl, Carl
Fisher, William Pfau, John Dykema
and Robert Forsythe.
William Reller, James Grace,
Thomas Tilley, James O'Connor, John
Milliken, Eugene Lattin, and Ernest
Getz.

I

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Continuous from 1

P.M.

NOW PLAYING!

THE ART CINEMA LEAGUE PRESENTS
DOSTOEVSKY'S IMMORTAL CLASSIC
CRIME A NT
PUNISHMA T

HARRY BAUR

PIERRE BLANCHAR

I

Ii

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

English Titles; French Dialogue
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Nov. 14, 15, 16- 8:30 P.M.
Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
Box Office Opens 2 P.M. Daily
Admission 42c (tax included) Reservations-Phone 6300

ALSO! LATEST WORLD NEWS
Coming Sunday GEO. RAFT "MR. ACE"

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Gym gear and beautiful hand-knit
Argyle sox which have sentimental val-
ue.,, Fred Palmer, Phone 5333. )9
WILL PERSON who exchanged raincoats,
Michigan Union Barber Shop, Friday,
Nov. 8, please call 8595. )13
THE K & E Log Log Decitrig Slide Rule
left in Room 308, Physics Lab at 2:00
1.M., Nov. 13, belongs to.Robert Argue,
419 N. State. Call 2-6439. )23
PERSON removing by mistake gray Covert
Topcoat from Bus. Ad. Library coatrack
Thursday afternoon please return to 103
Adams House. )2
LOST: Diamond ring with great sentimen-
tal value, between E. Med. and State St.
Nov. 12. Reward to finder. Call Frances
Don, 2-3119. )69
LOST: Parker "51" pen. Grey barrel, stain-
less steel cap. Reward. Call C. R. Lectka,
Ypsi 9268, after 6 p.m. )l
LOST: K & E slide rule, black case. Name,
B. W. Wilterdink on inside of case flap.
Phone 6284. Reward. )10
LOST: Black Shaeffer pen and pencil set.
Name engraved on set: Gladys Fisher.
Finder please call 2-4096 after 6 p.m.
Reward. )5
LOST: Ladies handbag, left in Oldsmobile
of law student. Please call 3560-W-2, 1605
Monson Ct., Willow Run. )6
LOST: Pink gold ladies Bulova watch,
near Stadium. Owner's name on back.
Reward. Phone: 2-0132. )22
FOR SALE
1 PAIR, twice worn, saddle color, square-
toe, British Walkers, women's shoes, 61,
A. Box 5, Michigan Daily. )4
FOR SALE: 41 Ford tudor super deluxe.
Heater, good tires, good condition. Phone
2-4839, 736. Forest. )85
NEARLY NEW "Lux Paca" Overcoat. Fully
lined, box style, Oxford gray. Size 42.1
Cost $75.00. Sell $35.00. 200 E. Cross,
Ypsilanti. Phone 1073J. )771
USED REMINGTON Portable. Typewriter.
Completely overhauled. Standard key-
board, plus Spanish punctuation marks.
Apply Daily, Box 87. )12
HAMMOND Typewriters for sale cheap.
English regular type, English italics,
Russian. Call 8702 after 6 P.M. )74
EAT LUNCH at Memorial Church, Hill at
Tappan on Saturday at 11:00. )831
MIDWAY Bicycle shop, 322 E. Liberty. We
have rebuilt used bikes for sale. Your
bike can be expertly repaired also. )561
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A better
price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. )14
TRANSPORTATION
TO CONNECTICUT or New York City. Will
share expenses and driving for ride
about December 21. Call 2-5553, Room
138, Buzz 3. )24

HELP WANTED
We Have Openings
For Girls
WHO CAN WORK DAY HOURS
DURING THE FIVE WEEK
TRAINING PERIOD AND
LATER BE ASSIGNED THE
FOLLOWING HOURS:
4:00 P.M. to 10:30 P.M.
4:30 P.M. to 11:00 P.M.
5:00 P.M. to 11:30 P.M.
5:30 P.M.to MIDNIGHT
YOU MAY TELEPHONE TO
INQUIRE ABOUT THIS
BETWEEN 8 A.M. AND 5 P.M.
CALL OUR EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
NUMBER 9900
Michigan Bell

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS, office machines cleaned,
repaired. Work guaranteed. Three-day
service. Calculators sold and rented.
Pick-up and delivery, Office Equipment
Service Co., 111 S. 4th Ave., 2-1213. )26
ELECTROLUX VACUUM CLEANERS
Sales - John Jadwin - Service
855 Tappan Phone 2-7412 or 2-2683
)41
PHOTOSTATIC COPYING : Discharges,
Drawings, Papers, Enlargements or Re-
ductions. Leave your work at Calkins-
Fletcher, Purchase Radio, Mail or bring
to Technical Photo Service, 917 Sunny-
side, Ann Arbor. )8C
TYPING: theses, term papers, addresses,
etc. Duplicating: notices, form letters,
programs, menus. A-2 Typing Service,
232 Nickels Arcade, phone 9811. )17
DANCE BAND: The Melody Men Orchestra
now available. Call Phil Savage, 25-8084
after 6 p.m. )11
TUTORING in Mathematics by M.I.T.
graduate, class of '24. John Alden Buck-
ler, 115 Catherine St., Ypsilanti. Tel.
Ypsi 1987W and ieverse charges. )16
CHUMLEE'S
FREE DELIVERY of your favorite sand-
wiches and beverages. Every day but
Monday. 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. Phone 2-6429.
)8
WANTED TO RENT
MALE GRADUATE Student desires single
room, vicinity of Oxford and Geddes.
Willing to work for rent. Reply Box 53.)3
EUROPE, S. Pacific and now Willow Run.
We want to move back to civilization.
Jr. and Grad student desire double room
for Spring, Summer, and subsequent
semesters. Please! Box No. 19. )62
MISCELLANEOUS
UNABLE TO GO-Have 2 tickets to O.S.U.
game. Call: 2-4591, 204 Prescott, after
7:00 PM.)7

L

AdML
ti '

Telephone

Co.

when you smoke
PHILIP MORRIS!

323 E. WASHINGTON ST. )15
HELP WANTED: Boys to work Saturday
and Sunday, 1-6, or 6-11. Setting pins at
an hourly rate. Apply at Ann Arbor
Recreation, or phone 2-0103. )18
WANTED
HELP! HELP! I'm in desperate need of
Tux or Tails, to rent or buy for tomor-
row night. Size 42 or 44 long. Call 9027
tonight after 6:00 if you can help me.
Please! )86
$10 REWARD for information Jleading to
room reasonably near campus, for male
graduate student during Spring and
subsequent terms. Box 15, Daily. )19
GRADUATE STUDENT (woman) desires
single room near campus for next sem-
ester. Box 80. )20
TAILORING and SEWING
ALTERATIONS and refitting of dresses
and formals. New skirts made to mea-
sure. Nothing in black. Miss Livingston,
315 S. Division, 2nd Floor Front. )25

North Main Opposite Court House
-- Ends Tonight
"PANAMINT'S BAD MAN"
- plus -
"BLONDE FOR A DAY"
--- Starts Saturday
"COLORADO SERENADE"
-- plus --
"NIGHT CARGO"

I

CLEA , F ESH, PURE
A erica s FIES garette!1
First smoke in the morning or last one at night-the
Favor's ALL jo r, when you smoke PHILIP MORRIS! And
here's why ...
There's an important difference in PHILIP MORRIS man-.
ufacture that makes PHILIP MORRIS taste better-smoke
better-because it lets the FULL FLAVOR of the world's
finest tobaccos come through for your complete enjoyment
clean, fresh, pure!
Try PHILIP MORRIS-you, too, will agree that PHILIP
MORRIS is America's FINEST Cigarete!

ANMAKE THIS STATEMENT!
0f all the Ileadi C
AORRIS isathe garettesP
excl-- -dere garette with an
rec er in anufact
.rcgnized by emij ac
authoritieas LeingWent med...
who ------ A

TODAY
AND SATURDAY

_c ., A T

inmmm m.

I

I~O ORMIN&-.

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