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November 14, 1946 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-14

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1940

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Inu ug / [Ue
Thupnin9 hi'aTime
With MURRAY GRANT
ALTHOUGH Michigan and Wisconsin have been football rivals for over
50 years, Saturday's renewal of the series marks only the 20th time
these two teams have met.
The last time the Wolverines and Badgers met was in 1944 when a'
Michigan team studded with Naval trainees defeated the Badgers, 14-0.
Two long runs, one of 86 yards by Bill Culligan, who is this year
back with the Wolverines, and the other, a 56-yard jaunt by nine-
letter winner Don Lund provided all the points the Wolverines needed.
The series itself started in 1892 when the beeftrusters of Wisconsin
met the new football squad of Michigan and fell by the score of 10-6. And
then in the next two meetings the Badgers turned the tables in wild and
wooly games by scores of 34-18 and 17-5.
The series resumed again in 1902, and the great Michigan teams
of the turn of the century under Fielding H. Yost downed the Madison
contingent four years in succession by scores of 6-0, 16-0, 28-0, and 12-0.
The rivalry then suffered a 16-year lapse as Michigan failed to schedule
the Badgers. In 1921 when the series was renewed, Wisconsin and the Wol-
verines played to a 7-7 tie, the only one in the history of the series.
But from then until 1928 the Maize and Blue notched seven con-
secutive victories over the Red of Wisconsin. This streak was featured
by the thrill-packed game of 1923 in which the Wolverines scored a
6-3 triumph.
In 1928 the Badgers scored a 7-0 victory over the Wolverines, and again
in 1934 Wisconsin notched a 10-0 victory over the hapless Michigan squad
of* that season.
But not since then have theBadgers succeeded in breaking into
the win column as the Maize and Blue triumphed in 1935 and again
in 1943 and '44.
Thus the Wolverines will be looking for their fifteenth victory over
the Badgers, but more, they will be looking for the opportunity to move
into a position for their first undisputed Western Conference football cham-
pionship since 1932.
'Golds' Win Cross Country Run;
Dave Williams Has Fastest Time

Lloyd H ouse,
Sigma Chi Cop
Championships
500 Witness Football,
Speedball Title Games
Cheered on by some 500 spirited
students, Sigma Chi defeated Kappa
Sigma, 14-8, for the fraternity speed-
ball title, while Lloyd House of the
West Quad ncsed out the East Quad
representative, Greene House, 7-6, to
cop the residence halls touch foot-
ball crown last night under the lights
of Wines Field.
Hill Leads Sigs
In the opening game of the I-M
doubleheader, Sigma Chi turned on
the heat in the third period by tally-
ing eight points and overcoming a
6-2 halftime deficit. Moe Hill, Sig-
ma Chi forward, led the charge with
four points in the big period and
kicked a total of five points to gain
high scoring honors for the champ-
ions.
With Winn Taplin and Don Larson
adding vital markers to the total,
the Sigma Chi defense held the Kap-
pa Sigs key man, Jim Hesler, to five
points while bottling up the restof
the offense.
Conversion Wins for Lloyd
As in the speedball contest; the
scoring opened up late in the sec-
ond half of the touch football title
game.
Midway in the fourth Nuarter
Greene House was forced to kick on
fourth down, but the ball was blocked
by one of the Greene House players
and, recovered by Bob Weber of
Lloyd House on the enemy three. Al
Pappas, sparkplug of Lloyd House,
threw a touchdown pass to Warren
Hildner on second down, and Chuck
Campbell made the conversion which
proved to be the winning margin.
Greene House came back from
their own twenty to tally on a pass
from, Bill Baker to Art Topping, but
the attempted extra point was wide.
The Michigan Coliseum, cor-
ner of Fifth and Hill Streets, is
now open for ice skating every
night from 8 and Saturday and
Sunday afternoons. The admis-
sion charge is 25 cents, and identi-
fication cards must be shown.

FordFamiliar Figure To
Football Fans This Fall
Husky End Looks to Coaching or Pro Football
After Obtaining Degree in Physical Education

LEN FORD - Michigan's lanky end whose pass-catching and defen-
sive play have been outstanding features of the Maize and Blue line
this season.
MAKING 'EM COUNT:
Jim Brieske's Placements Make
Him Second in Michigan Scoring

By JERRY ALEXANDER
Len Ford, the big 212-pound end
on our current Wolverine eleven has
won himself a favored spot with the
grandstanders through his play so
far this season..
It's a well deserved place too, for
Ford's figure can usually be seen
right where all the action is, boring in
for those jarring tackles he's so well
known for. In fact the times are
numerous when he has tackled oppos-
ing backs from behind who were on
their way for long gains.
Ford Is Pass Catcher
Besides being such a bulwark on
defense, Ford has often been in the
offensive spotlight too. To date he's
caught 11 passes, the best of which
was that one handed stab he made in
the Indiana game, leaping high in
the air to grab the pigskin with one
hand from the two backs guarding
him in the end zone.
On being questioned about those
misdirected laterals that terminate
some of the pass plays, Ford admit-
ter 'that he was solely to blame; It
must be added, however, that on sev-
eral of those plays, the ball was de-
liberately punched out of his hands, a
thing the ordinary spectator misses
quite readily. That was the cause of
most of the 12 fumbles the boys were
responsible for in the Illinois game.
This business of punching at the ball
is a favorite pastime of the big end
himself and has resulted in several
opposition fumbles this year.
Davis to Folsom, Touchdown!
As passing is used these days, it
can be divided into two main types
of play. One, in which the thrower
heaves the ball to a spot expecting
the receiver to be there, and the sec-
ond kind where the passer has op-
tional choices of whom to pass to. In
connection with the former, Ford re-
counted an incident concerning the
Army game. He and some of the
linemen were smearing Glenn Davis
on an attempted pass, but "Mr. Out-
side," in desperation, heaved the ball,
1

Neither cold, nor darkness, nor the
hilly turf of the University golf course
could stay the 42 distance runners of
the Michigan track team from the
swift completion of a three and one-
half mile intra-squad handicap
cross-country jaunt yesterday, won
by the seven-man "Gold" team.
Dave Williams' 17:31 clocking gave
him first placeson the basis of best
time, in the hill-and-dale run which
wound up the squad's fall outdoor
practice sessions. Don Queller had
the second best time, 17:40, with Herb
Barten thfrd. Those who chalked up
the top 10 clockings were awarded
gold medals.
Coach Ken Doherty commented the

squad's composite showing as "ex-
cellent," singling out Williams' per-
formance.
The winning "Gold" team was com-
posed of Capt. Birdsall, Williams, Jus-
tin Williams, Rog Kessler, Ross Wil-
lard, Fred Stolliker, and Dean Voegt-
len, all of whom received theatre
passes for their efforts. There were
six teams in the competition.
Since the race was a handicap af-
fair, the first man to actually cross
the finish line was 0. W. Smith, fol-
lowed by George Shepherd and Bill
Bolliger. The first ten men to find
their way through the dark and cold
to the end were awarded University
athletic certificates.

By ALYS GEORGE
Although his hands have never
touched the pigskin while playing
for Michigan, "automatic" Jim
Brieske's well-trained toe has chalked
up enough points to give him a sec-
ond place tie for totalvpoints scored
among his fellow Wolverines, and
place him tenth in the Big Nine this
year.
While he was still in grammar
school in his home town, Harbor
Beach, Michigan, Brieske set out to
learn the art of booting the pigskin
between the uprights. In the high
school circuit he not only played his
favorite post at center and kicked the
extra points, but also saw duty at
the end and fullback spots.
Robinson Holds, Brieske Kicks
Ever since Brieske came to Michi-
gan, Don Robinson has been the only
player to hold the ball when he at-
tempted his many important points
after touchdown. Brieske says that
Robbie has never fumbled the ball
or failed to place the pigskin in the

right spot. In Michigan's 32-20 up-
set win over Notre Dame in 1942,
Brieske and Robinson pulled a fake
field goal attempt on the Irish,/with
Robbie taking the ball over for a
touchdown.
Brieske wound up the 1942 season
leading the Western Conference in
conversion attempts with 15 out of
16 and posted a grand total of 26
out of 29 for the season. He was in-
jured in spring practice in 1943 and
didn't see any action during the
gridiron campaign that fall.
Brieske Returns
Donning a Maize and Blue uniform
again this year after seeing Navy
service, "automatic" Jim has proved
that he has not lost the magic touch.
This season he has sliced the up-
rights 18 times, with two of his at-
tempts being blocked by opposing
linemen.
In the Wolverine romp over Mich-
igan State last week Brieske spent
most of his time trotting back and
forth between the bench and the
gridiron.

North Main Opposite Court House
Today and Friday ---
SMITH BALLEW in
"PANAHNT'S BAD MAN"
- plus-
HUGH, BEAUMONT in
"BLONDE FOR A DAY"

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--

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Last Day Today ---_
"SARATOGA TRUNK"
with Ingrid Bergman
Gary Cooper
-- Friday and Saturday
"THE BLACK ANGEL"
--and-
"UNDER FIESTA STARS"

STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Sold, Rented, Repaired
O. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177
RIDER'S
HOBBY SUPPLIES
302 South State Street

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lz;;:

CLEARY
COLLEGE

HOMECOMING

BALL

The Nation's Newest Sensation
BOB CHESTER
and His
ORCHESTRA

WASHTENAW
COUNTRY CLUB
NOVEMBER 15, 1946
Everyone In, vited
Tickets available at
AUTOMOBILE CLUB
207 South Fourth Avenue.

LOST AND FOUND
FOUND: woman's watch at I-M Building
Sat. eve. Owner may have upon identi-
fication and payment for ad. Box 123.)81
LOST: Diamond ring with great sentimen-
tal value, between E. Med. and State St.
Nov. 12. Reward to finder. Call Frances
Don, 2-3119. )69
LOST: Parker "51" pen. Grey barrel, stain-
less steel cap. Reward. Call C. R. Lectka,
Ypsi 9268, after 6 p.m. )1
LOST: K & E slide rule, black case. Name,
B. W. Wilterdink on inside of case flap.
Phone 6284. Reward. )10
LOST: Black Shaeffer pen and pencil set.
Name engraved on set: Gladys Fisher.
Finder please call 2-4096 after 6 p.m.
Reward.-
LOST: Ladies handbag, left in Oldsmobile
of law student. Please call 3560-W-2, 1605
Monson 'Ct., Willow Run..)6
SOMEBODY took the wrong Navy flight
jacket sometime between 9 and 3 Tues-
day. Important keys in pocket. Contact
Holly E. Nelson at Ypsilanti 2992 for ex-
change. ) 82
LOST: Pink gold ladies Bulova watch,
near Stadium. Owner's name on back.
Reward. Phone: 2-0132. )22
LOST: Shell-rimmed Glasses, Sat., Nov. 2
in vicinity of Michigan Theatre. Reward.
7279. ) 79
WILL THE PERSON who took, by mistake,
man's gray gabardine coat from Pretzel
Bell Friday night, contact owner to ex-
change for his own. Call Milan 2-4551.
)78
LOST: Harvel wristwatch with small pair
of Navy wings on band, between Univ.
and Stadium, Saturday. Notify Daily
Office, 23241. )76
WILL the party who got the wrong rain-
coat Friday, Nov. 8th at Couzens Hall
kindly call at the dormitory for an ex-
change? )75
LOST: $18.00 for recovery of heirloom
bracelet. Elmma Hech engraved inside.
Call 2-4471, Rm. 5023. ) 20
LOST 9 A.M. Friday: Pink plastic frame
glasses, between corner of S. University
and Church and Arch. School. Call La-
Vaughn. 9080. Reward. )73
LOST: Black cloth purse at stadium, sect.
16, Saturday - valuables, identification.
Marge DeYoung. Reward. Call 8177 )71
LOST: Maroon Shaeffer Fountain Pen.
Thursday, in Haven Hall. Call Debbie
Weinerman, 537 Mosher. )7
WILL the person who removed gray top-
coat from hanger 222, basement Hutch-
ins Hall Monday morning, please return
III X11

same and contents to the same place
Wednesday or Friday before eleven. )52
THE PERSON who took the "Deci-Point"
Slide Rule, No. 000237, from 103 Econ
Bldg., on Friday, Nov. 8, during the noon
hour could please return same or get the
instruction book to make it complete
by calling 25-7203. )74
HELP WANTED
We Have Openings
For Girls
WHO CAN WORK DAY HOURS
DURING THE FIVE WEEK
TRAINING PERIOD AND
LATER BE ASSIGNED THE
FOLLOWING HOURS:
4:00 P.M. to 10:30 P.M.
4:30 P.M. to 11:00 P.M.
= 5:00 P.M. to 11:30 P.M.
5:30 P.M.to MIDNIGHT
YOU MAY TELEPHONE TO
INQUIRE ABOUT THIS
BETWEEN 8 A.M. AND 5 P.M.
CALL OUR FMPLOYMENT OFFICE
NUMBER 9900
Michigan Bell

MEN: HOWEVER - If you're really des-
perate, call 9322. We're desperate, too.)13
EAT LUNCH at Memorial Church, Hill at
Tappan on Saturday at 11:00. )83
MIDWAY Bicycle shop, 322 E. Liberty. W&
have rebuilt used bikes for sale. Your
bike can be expertly repaired also. )56
SPECIAL Service Friday Mystic Sa La Ru-
tans usual place, 8:30 )23
WANTED
FLASH-BULB CAMERA: Want to get a
couple snapshots of a plaster cast over
here in the Art School. Will make it
worth your while. Call 5572 after 10 P.M.
)19
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A better
price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. )14

HARRY BAUR

FOR RENT

Telephone

4

Co.

THE ART CINEMA LEAGUE PRESENTS
DOSTOEVSKY'S IMMORTAL CLASSIC
"CRIME AND
PUNISHMENT"

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323 E. WASHINGTON ST.

)15

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' _ .

Whien "the Fall Wind's Blow,
.. R
Take Nature's friend-
ly jibes in stride . .
get ready for winter
now. Choose an all-
wool sweater for solid
X t ' om fort.
h} f A casual sport sweater
with V-neck, as pic-
tured, comes in brown,
>. wne, green, maize, tan
:t1 aLl .prieA

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 41 Ford tudor super deluxe.
Heater, good tires, good condition. Phone
2-4839, 736 Forest.
NEARLY NEW "Lux Paca" Overcoat. Fully
lined, box style, Oxford gray. Size 42.
Cost $75.00. Sell $35.00. 200 E. Cross,
Ypsilanti. Phone 1073J. )77
USED REMINGTON Portable Typewriter.
Completely overhauled. Standard key-
board, plus Spanish punctuation marks.
Apply Daily, Box, 87. )12
HAMMOND Typewriters for sale cheap.
English regular type, English italics,
Russian. Call 8702 after 6 P.M. )74
MISCELLANEOUS
MEN: Are you planning to sit home Nov.
29th' Don't let us change your plans!
-"9322" ) 84

ONE DOUBLE ROOM and one single room.
514 S. Forest. Call 2-7128. )72
WANTED TO RENT
MALE GRADUATE Student desires single
room, vicinity of Oxford and Geddes.
Willing to work for rent. Reply Box 53.)3
EUROPE, S. Pacific and now Willow Run.
We want to move back to civilization.
Jr. and Grad student desire double room
for Spring, Summer, and subsequent
semesters. Please ! Box No. 19. )62
WANTED TO RENT: Veteran wants apart.
ment for married couple beginning in
February. Will rent before then if nec-
essary. Contact B. E. Longo at Law Club,
4145. ) 68
BUSINESS SERVICES
PHOTOSTATIC COPYING: Discharges,
Drawings, Papers, Enlargements or Re-
ductions. Leave your work at Calkins-
Fletcher, Purchase Radio, Mail or bring
to Technical Photo Service, 917 tunny-
side, Ann Arbor. )8C
TYPING: theses, term papers, addresses,
etc. Duplicating: notices, form letters,
programs, menus. A-2 Typing Service,
232 Nickels Arcade, phone 9811. )17
DANCE BAND: The Melody Men Orchestra
now available. Call Phil Savage, 25-8084
after 6 p.m. )11
TUTORING in Mathematics by M.I.T.
graduate, class of '24. John Alden Buck-
ler, 115 Catherine St., Ypsilanti. Tel.
Ypsi 1987W and reverse charges. )16
CHUMLEE'S
FREE DELIVERY of your favorite- sand-
wiches and beverages. Every day but
Monday. 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. Phone 2-6429.
)8

NOW PLAYING!

English Titles; French Dialogue
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Nov. 14, 15, 16-8:30 PA
Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
Box Office Opens 2 P.M. Daily
Admission 42c (tax included) Reservations-Phone 63

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TYPEWRITER
SERVICE
FOR EXPERT TYP'EWIllTERl SERI VICE

READY

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