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November 12, 1946 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-12

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PAGE TWO

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1948

Enrollment Shows Increase
In Extension Service Classes

Campus Highlights

Enrollment figures for University
Extension Service classes have
reached a new high this semester,
with some courses not yet opened.
In Detroit alone 3,450 enrollments
have been received. Previous high
ROTC Students
Initiate Monthly
Lecture Series
In line with the Ordnance Depart-
nient policy of coordination with in-
dustrial and research establishments,
advanced course ROTC ordnance stu-
dents are initiating a series of month-
ly lectures to be given by arsenal, in-
dustrial, or University personnel ac-
tively engaged in ordnance applica-
tions of engineering training.
The first lecture of the series will
be given at 8 p.m. Friday in Rm. 303
West Engineering. Col. Steven L.
O'Connor, *chief of production at the
Detroit tank arsenal, will speak on
"Engineering Problems in the Mod-
ern Manufacture of Gun Tubes."
Col. O'Connor was in charge of the
engineering section of Watervliet Ar-
senal, center of U. S. Army gun tube
manufacture, during the war.
The faculty and students of the en-
gineering college and related sciences
have been invited to attend the lec-
ture.
Local Girl Gets
Conference Post,
Special To The Daily
SOUTH HADLEY, Mass., Nov. 11
-Phyllis Anne Applegate, daughter
of Dr. and Mrs. O. C. Applegate of
2015 Woodside Road, is a member of
the publicity committee for the three
day Fellowship of Faiths Campus
Conference, beginning today at
Mount Holyoke College..
The theme of the conference will
be "Is Religion a Relic?" Among
the speakers who will deal with the
question of the place of personal re-
ligion in modern sciety are Rabbi
Albert A. Goldman of Boston, Lewis
Fdx, attorney, of Hartford, Conn.,
and Myra Wilson, head of the School
for Girls at Northfield, Mass.
False Alarm Wakes
Men at Willow Run
Men of Dorm 3, Willow Village,
were awakened at 6:05 a.m. yester-
day by a fire alarm for a fire that
wasn't there.
Upon investigation, Jerry Wetzel,
house director, and several other
residents, discovered that heat from
smoldering insulation in a locked
furnace room had automatically set
off the alarm.
The fire department arrived on
the scene immediately and the situ-
ation was under control in a matter
of minutes.

enrollment for any one semester in
Detroit has been just under 2,600.
In 1934-35 the total state-wide en-
rollment in extension programs was
approximately 3,500.
State-wide Enrollment
In Grand Rapids the enrollments
are already over 1,100 and total fig-
ures are expected to be three times
that of the fall of 1943 when the Ex-
tension Center of Western Michigan
was open as an experiment. In-
creased enrollments-have also been
noted in the Extension programs in
Flint, Saginaw and Ann Arbor.
In Ann Arbor 59 are enrolled in
the Great Books course. There are
also two sections in painting and
composition with a combined enroll-
ment of 43. A course in educational
psychology, set up for a group of
nurses at University Hospital, has an
enrollment of 44.
Veterans Swell Enrollment
Enrollment of veterans accounts
for a large part of the increased reg-
istration. In Detroit approximately
14 per cent of the enrollments have
been made under the G.I. Bill.
Large registrations in Detroit have
been noted in the courses conducted
by Dr. and Mrs. Harry Overstreet on
The Development of Personality and
Building a Philosophy of Life.
Other popular courses are those in
building, accounting, business law,
die design, economics, life .insurance,
semantics, psychology, gardening,
feature writing, current books, and
languages, with the highest enroll-
ment in beginning Spanish.
Largest enrollment in Grand Rap-
ids is. in the field of Business Admin-
istration.

'Ensian Tryouts . .

I

RESULT: MINOR INJURIES-R-Two young persons e ame out of this accident with only minor injuries, when
the car in which they were riding (top) went out of c ontrol, sheared off a telephone pole and hurtled 30 feet
through the air to its resting place atop this parked c ar in Ft. Wayne, Ind. At left are the rear wheels of
the car which caused all the damage. Injuries to the two passengers were a broken collar bone and lacerations
of the face.

FOUR CENTURY-OLD ART:
Petroit Art Institute Curator
To Discuss Tapestry Exhibit

Mrs. Adele Coulin Weibel, curator
of textiles at the Detroit Institute of
Art, will deliver a University lecture
entitled "The Art of Tapestry" at
4:15 this afternoon in the West Gal-
lery of Alumni Memorial Hall.
The current exhibition of four cen-
turies of tapestry weaving being pre-
sented by the University Museum of
Art was selected from the collections

Election Rules
The following rules, established by the election committee of the
Student Legislature, will govern the campus elections today and tomor-
row.
J. At least three persons will be stationed at the ballot boxes during
polling hours.
2. No campaigning will be allowed within 50 feet of the ballot box.
(Campaigning is defined as any attempt to influence the decision of
qualified voters.)
3 No distribution of printed matter concerning the election will be
allowed within the area bounded by S. University, N. University, E. Uni-
versity and S. State streets.
4. The use -of slanderous and libelous campaign statements is sub-
ject to disqualification.
5. Campaign expenditures are subject to a $5 limit.
6. The elector need not vote for more candidates than he chooses.
7. Each voter must present his own identification card. There will
be no voting by proxy.
8. The ballot will be given to the voter at time of identification check.
9. Ballot will be filled out and folded by the voter and handed to at-
tendant.
10. Attendant will stamp and immediately place ballot in box in full
view of the voter.
1. Ballot boxes will be checked, locked and sealed before the election
by members of the election committee.
12. After the election, ballot boxes will be collected, opened and
counted by members of the election committee.
13. The total vote and the vote for each candidate will be published
in The Daily.
14. Ballots will be retained by the election committee for a period of
30 days following the election.

of two New York dealers under the
guidance of Mrs. Weibel,
The early Gothic tapestries of the
collection are being exhibited in the
North Gallery of the Alumni Hall
Galleries. Among them is a work en-
titled a "Scene from the Trojan War"
in which the horrors of battle are
depicted in minute detail. Another
colorful French tapestry of pastoral
life demonstrates the lack of perspec-
tive in the early works.
Representative tapestries from all
four centuries are among those which
may be seen in the West Gallery dur-
ing the exhibit. "The Obsequies of
Decius Mus;" a Flemish tapestry of
1640, is an actual reproduction on
cloth of the painting by Rubens.
The South Gallery is filled with
woven works of art of the eighteenth
century. The swordsmanship of Don
Quixote is illustrated in the tapestry
"The Cowardice of Sancho Panza" in
which Sancho Panza is climbing a
tree.
It is estimated that in the manu-
facture .of the ancient tapestries it
took one weaver a year to complete
approximately three square yards of
material. Most of the tapestries on
exhibit in Alumni Hall cover an en-
tire wall of the gallery.
Both the exhibition and Mrs. Wei-
bel's lecture tomorrow are open to
the University and the public in gen-
eral. The Four Centuries of Tapes-'
try Weaving exhibit will continue
through the month of November. The
Alumni Memorial Hall Galleries are
open from 10 a.m. to noon daily ex-
cept Monday and from 2 to 5 p.m. on
Sundays.
"U' Professors.
Attend M.etma
Profs. Arthur W. Bromage and
James K. Pollock, of the political sci-
ence department, are attending the
National Municipal League Confer-
ence the first part of this week in
Philadelphia.
Prof. Bromage will read a paper
before the State Government Clinicl
on state reorganization.
Prof. Shirley W. Allen of the for-
estry and conservation school leaves
tomorrow for a speaking engagement
in Jefferson City, Mo., where he will
speak to the Missouri State depart-
ment of conservation conference on
"Forestry: Its Challenge and Promise
to Missouri."
Continuous from 1 P.M.
NOW

Tech nicHints
Garg Sabotage
Delaying Sales
The Michigan Technic, engineering
students' publication, will make its
first fall appearance on campus to-
morrow and Thursday, according to
Milt David, editor.
Delays experienced at the printers
was the reason given for the decision
to push the publication date back
two days. Previously it had been an-
nounced that the Technic would ap-
pear Monday.
The editors of the Technic are now
reported to be investigating the pos-
sibility that frequent delays at the
printers may be the work of over-
zealous Gargoyle salesmen.
Dressed up in a new cover, the first
issue will feature a "Time and Mo-
tion Study" by Arthur Jones. The ar-
ticle is a general analysis of the meth-
ods of promoting greater production
efficiency used by engineers to save
consumers millions of dollars every
year.
Also featured will be a discussion
of "Silicones" by Ted Gier. The ar-
ticle presents a brief historical sum-
mary of the development of silicones,
explains the production flow-sheet
and includes the uses of the new
compounds.
Included in the issue will be an ex-
planation of the construction and op-
eration of heavy-duty airbrake instal-
lations; information of improved
shock-absorbing devices and a dis-
cussion of methods of compressing
electrical circuits.
Band Plays for
Armistice Rites
Participating in an Armistice Day
program at Lansing, the University
Marching Band performed on. the
capitol lawn from 11:30 to 11:45 a.m.
yesterday.
The ceremony, which included a
speech by Gov. Kelly, specially hon-
ored veterans of the well-known 32nd
division who fought in World War II.
Conducted by William D. Revelli,
the band played the national anthem
at the event and sounded taps in a
radio broadcast from 11:45 to 12:15
p.m.
Gov, Kelly received the battle flags
of the Michigan National Guard at
the program from Maj. Gen. Louis A.
Craig, deputy commanding general of
the 5th Army. During the war Maj.
Gen. Craig was commander of the
9th infantry division.
STIC nIGAN
--Today and Wednesday

There will be a meeting for all 'En-}
sian tryouts who intend to remain
on the staff at 4:15 p.m. today in4
the Student Publications Building.
* * *
Russian Conversation. . .
The Russian Conversation Group
will meet at 3:30 p.m:. today and
tomorrow in the League Grill.
Engineering Discussion
Prof. Myron H. Nichols, of the
aeronautical engineering department
will speak on "Telemetering in Con-
nection with Guided Missiles" at the
regular meeting of the student chap-
ter of the Institute of Aeronautical
Sciences Thursday at the Union.
A captured German film on super-
sonic flight will also be shown.
Polonia Club Meeting .
Polonia Society will hold a meet-
at 7:30 p.m. today in the Inter-
national Center.
Students of Polish descent are
invited to attend and to become'
members of the society.
IRA Council To Meet.. .
The executive council of the Inter-
Racial Association will:meet at 4:30
p.m. today in the Union.
Music Forums
To Meet Here
Program To Feature
Many State Educators
A varied program for the annual
convention of the Michigan Music
Teachers Association to be held
today and tomorrow here has
been announced by Dr. Roy Under-
wood, head of the music department
at Michigan State College.
Guest speakers include Mrs. Mar-
jorie Truelove Mackown, of the East-
man School of Music, Dr. Elwon
Carter, of Western State College,
and Dr. Martha G. Colby, of the
University of Michigan.
A musical program will highlight
artists from Alma College, Michigan
State Normal College and Palmer
Christian, Sidney F. Giles and
Prof. Gilbert Ross from the Uni-
versity of Michigan.
The two-day convention will als.
include forums headed by Maur-
ice Dumesnil, Michigan State College;
Mr. David Strickler, Albion College
and from the University of Michigan,
Prof. Gilbert Ross, director of the
University String Orchestra.

Canterbury Club.
The Canterbury Club
breakfast at the student
lowing Holy Communion
7:15 a.m. tomorrow.

- -
will serve
center fol-
Services at

Union Coffee Hour ... .
The Union will hold the first of
a series of coffee hours to provide
students with an opportunity to
get acquainted with their profes-
sors at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in the
Terrace Room of the Union.
Faculty members of the political
science department will be this
week's guests. The meeting is open
to students interested in the extra-
classroom aspects of poli t i c al
science.
* * *
Varsity Committee . .
The Varsity Committee of the Stu-
dent Legislature will meet at 7:30
p.m. today in Rm. 302 of the Union.
All members are requested to be
present.

Members of the council will for-
mulate plans for the appearance
here of Herbert Apthecker, editor of
the New Masses and outstanding
authority on Negro problems, Nov.20.
Reports of the educational and
dance committees will also be heard
and considered.
Prof. Albert To Speak...
Prof. A. A. Albert, of the Univer-
sity of Chicago, will speak to the
Mathematical Club on "The The-
ory of Jordan Algebras" at 8 p.m.
today in the West Conference
Room of the Rackham Building.
* * *
Slosson To Discuss UN . .
Prof. Preston W. Slosson, of the
history department, will discuss "The
United Nations and the Colonial
Problem" at 7:30 p.m. today in Rm.
321-25 of the Union under the spon-
sorship of the Hindustan Association.
** *
Lutheran Students .. .
The Lutheran Student Association
will continue its study on church
history at 7:30 p.m. today at the
Lutheran Student Center.
* * *
Guild House Tea . .
A tea will be given by the Con-
gregational-Disciples% Guild from
4:30 to 6 p.m. today in the Guild
House.
* * *

RIDER'S
HOBBY SUPPLIES
302 South State Street

North Main Opposite Court House
Ends Tonight
"CUBAN PETE" and
"TRAIL DUST"
- Starts Wednesday
HUGH BEAUMONT in
"BLONDE FOR A DAY"
- plus -
"PANAMINT'S BAD MAN"

s

___--- Now Playing --
"SARATOGA TRUNK"
Starring GARY COOPER
and INGRID BERGMAN
- EXTRA -
ARMY FOOTBALL
CHAMPIONS

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING,

U

A

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Shell-rimmed Glasses, Sat., Nov. 2
in vicinity of Michigan Theatre. Reward.
7279. )79
WILL THE PERSON who took, by mistake,
man's gray gabardine coat from Pretzel
Bell Friday night, contact owner to ex-
change for his own. Call Milan 2-4551.
)78
FOUND: Black suede shoe ornament, I-M'
Building, Saturday night. Call Lynn,
8598. . ) 77
LOST: Harvel wristwatch with small pair
of Navy wings on band, between Univ.
and Stadium, Saturday. Notify Daily
Office, 23241. )76
WILL the party who got the wrong rain-
coat Friday, Nov. 8th at Couzens Hall
kindly call at the dormitory for an ex-
change? )75
THE PERSON who took the "Devi-Point"
Slide Rule, No. 000237, from 103 Econ
Bldg., on Friday, Nov. 8, during the noon
hour could please return same or get the
instruction book to make it complete
by calling 25-7203. _ )74
LOST 9 A.M. Friday: Pink plastic frame
glasses, between corner of S. University
and Church and Arch. School. Call La-
Vaughn. 9080. Reward. )73
LOST: Black cloth purse at stadium, sect.
16, Saturday - valuables, identification.
Marge DeYoung. Reward. Call 8177 )71
LOST: Maroon Shaeffer Fountain Pen.
Thursday, In Haven Hall. Call Debbie
Weinerman. 537 Mosher. )7
WILL the person who removed gray top-
coat from hanger 222. basement Hutch-
ins Hail Monday morning, please return
same and contents to the-same place
Wednesday or Friday before eleven. )52
LOST: Parker 51 pen. Gold top, black bar-

HELP WANTED
WANTED: Boys to work for meals. League
House. 604 E. Madison. Phone 4489 after
11 a.m. )62
We Have Openings
For Girls
WHO CAN WORK DAY HOURS
DURING THE FIVE WEEK
TRAINING PERIOD AND
LATER BE ASSIGNED THE
FOLLOWING HOURS:
4:00 P.M. to 10:30 P.M.
4:30 P.M. to 11:00 P.M.
5:00 P.M. to 11:30 P.M.
5:30 P.M.to MIDNIGH'T
YOU MAY TELEPHONE TO
INQUIRE ABOUT THIS
BETWEEN 8 A.M. AND 5 P.M.
CALL OUR FMPLOYMEN'T 'ICE
NUMBER 9900
Michigan Bell

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1 Pair, twice worn, saddle
color, square-toe, British Walkers, wo-
men's shoes, 61A. Box 5, Michigan
Daily. ) 74
ARTISTS' MODEL Tenor Banjo. Box 333,
Michigan Daily. )6
USED WHIZZER MOTOR BIKE for sale,
complete with generator lights, speedo-
meter and basket. Call 7187. )12
GET IN BUSINESS FOR YOURSELF mak-
ing cement blocks. 1,000 to 2,000 per day.
New oscillating, vibrating and tamping
block machines and equipment available
for immediate delivery. Write L. Van-
der Zand, Milford, Indiana. )23
FOR SALE: Beautiful home-raised canar-
les, parakeets and finches, bird supplies
and cages. Male Persian cat. 562 S. 7th
Phone 5330. )10
MISCELLANEOUS
MIDWAY Bicycle shop, 322 E. Liberty. We
have rebuilt used bikes for sale. Your
bike can be expertly repaired also. )56
BUSINESS SERVICES
PHOTOSTATIC COPYING: Discharges, ,
Drawings, Papers, Enlargements or Re-
ductions. Leave your work at Calkins-
Fletcher, Purchase Radio, Mail or bring
to Technicdl Photo Service, 917 Sunny-
side, Ann Arbor. )80
TYPING: theses, term papers, addresses,
etc. Duplicat ing: notices, form letters,
programs, m nus. A-2 Typing Service,
:22 Nickels Atc ade, phone 9811 . - )17
I ANC'E BAND: The Melody Men Orchestra
now available. Call Phil Savage, 25-8084
after 6 p.m. )I1

I

- ' .,
. ,",

#4P SUMh
4 PR~OVEN
BUOW !I'

i

4!

-DAY-
SERVICE
on
DRY CLEANING
IF BROUGHT IN TO EITHER OF OUR STORES ON
MONDAYS, TUESDAYS OR WEDNESDAYS.
3.ma
{ 0 RYSERi

.k

N.

I

I

Telephone

Co.

323 E. WASHINGTON ST.

WANTED
MALE STUDENT desires waiting .) ib t.
fraternity or sorority house. Contaict
Box 79, Michi;an Daily. ) l
$15 REWARD for iiAormation leading to

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