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November 07, 1946 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-07

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TWO

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1946

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Candidates' Statements

C4

The following qualification state-
ments have been submitted by can-
didates for the Student Legislature.
Statements of the other 14 indepen-
dent candidates will appear tomor-
row. The All-Campus Party slate
will be published Saturday and the
University Committee's p 1 a t f o r m
Sunday.
Betty Benedct .. .
For the past four months I have
been working with the Student Leg-
islature, recording the minutes at
each meeting, which has allowed me
to become familiar with the prob-
lens facing the Legislature.
I feel that this experience, plus
my willingness to work and my in-
terest in stu'dent activities, qualifies
me for this position.
Philip n ekema*
I sincerely believe that the Student
Legislature should be the sounding-
board for ideas, suggestions, and
grievances of the student body; thus
the policies which the Legislature
sets forth will be truly representa-
tive of the students as a whole. With
this in mind, I am certain that com-
plete harmony can more nearly be
achieved.
Dick Bodycombe ***
Second-semester junior. Member
of Sphinx society and president of
Alpha Tau Omega fraternity. Army
Air Force (15th) veteran. Freshman
baseball numerals in '42. Varsity
baseball in n46. Platform: stimulate
school spirit at Michigan and urge
better backing of Wolverine athletic
teams. Encourage more interest and
participation in student government.
STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Sold, Rented, Repaired
0. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

Sally Bowen . . .
The Student Legislature should
prove to the administration that it
is worthy of having more authority
on this campus. The counseling sys-
tem should be run more efficiently,
giving the student more and better
guidance. A student bureau should
be set up for investigating the hous-
ing situation for students.
James Brieske .. .
I attended Michigan as a civilian,
then as a V-12 trainee, and now as'
a civilian again. I feel that I know
the privileges and limitations of the
school. As a member of the Student
Legislature I can actively carry out
a program beneficial to the student
body.
Virginia Brown ,*.*.
I feel that my main qualification
for Student Legislature is my interest
and desire to devote time and energy
to further activities of a representa-
tive student government. Among
these, I would encourage a grading
system for courses and professors,.
an unlimited cut system and a fairer
distribution of fbotball tickets.
Bob Carpenter.. .
I believe that I am qualified for a
position on the Student Legislature
because of my experience in such
matters in high school. Further, I
am now pursuing a pre-law course
and have a natural interest in gov-
ernment. If elected, I pledge honest
representation of the majority of the
students.
Leonard Cohen.. .
I believe student government
should fight for the rights and needs
of the students. Therefore I pledge
to work mainly on making the cam-
pus a leading force in the fight for
world peace, as it traditionallydhas
been. I will also work for federal
aid to expand educational facilities
and for forums on national and in-
ternational affairs.
Betty Col . .
I believe that my most pertinent
qualification is my experience in stu-
dent government in high school. I
have been active in Soph Cabaret
and the Pep Club. I am an inter-
ested, d e p e n d a b l e, conscientious
worker and will do my best to help
make the Legislature a strong rep-
resentative of the student body.
Helen Cole . . .
I will promote increased publicity
of Legislature activities if elected.
The student body should be kept

fully informed of the action taken
on measures under consideration. I
shall also work for a means by which
student suggestions and complaints
can be readily channelled to the ac-
tive attention of the Legislature.
Arthur Derl~erian.
I am running as an independent
for one major reason. I have a sin-
cere belief in the individual and not
in a mass machine.
This belief, and my actions, with
my past experience at this Univer-
sity, will be directed toward the in-
dividual's voice in the Student Legis-
lature.
Joan reenwald.-.
Willingness to work is a quality
which will be typical of my fellow
candidates. Their qualifications will
vary from society presidents to the
less significant posts. But regardless
of stated qualifications the person
who is most willing to work for your
program is the candidate you want
to represent you. I feel I am this
candidate.
Polly Hanson.. .
I shall strive to represent student
opinion by keeping in as close con-
tact with the student body as pos-
sible; to create and maintain unity
on the campus, as I have been both
an independent and a sorority mem-
ber and understand the problems of
both; to afford a channel for the ex-
pression of student suggestions and
ideas.
Browntie fhowell ,. ,
The Student Legislature needs
those representatives who have the
interests and the welfare of the stu-
dent body at heart and who realize
the importance of student govern-
ment. I believe that I fill these
qualifications. Qualifications: Stu-
dent Book Exchange, Stockwell
Council, Soph Cabar et, Elisian Try-
out staff.
Job Interviews Will Be
Given to Geology Seniors
Graduating geology students will
be interviewed regarding prospective
employment today and tomorrow on
campus by Mr. Fred Moore, represen-
tative of a large petroleum company.

Womren Wl"
Still Use Side
Door of Union
Michigan women will continue to
use the side entrance of the Union
only, for several "good reasons,"
Franklin C. Kuenzel stated yester-
day.
The Union was built with the idea
of providing a club for men, he ex-
plained, and as such women's privi-
leges were set up in the same man-
ner as other men's clubs after which
the Union was patterned.
The Union handbook of rules and
regulations explicitly states that "all
women, whether or not escorted by
members or guests, must enter and
leave the building by the North En-
trance or the South Tower Entrance
in the International Center.
The handbook is published-by the
Union board of directors, which con-
sists of students, faculty, alumni and
regents of the University.
A further reason for the contin-
uance of the tradition, Kuenzel ex-
plained, is that at the time that the
Union opened, a special dining room
was created for the use of Union
members who wished to bring female
guests to the Union for meals on
weekdays.
This. room was located in what is
now the Anderson Room and it was
therefore more convenient to ap-
proach the ladies dining room from
the North Entrance
The Union was one of the first
college unions, Kuenzel, pointed out.
and spearheaded the formation of
the Associated College Unions in
1920.
Case Club Wi11
Argue Lawsuit
The question of racial restrictive
covenants in leases will be debated
by the Case Club of the law school at
4 p.m. tomorrow in the Practice
Courtroom, second floor, Hutchins
Hall.
In the case to be debated the citi-
zens of a town entered into a cove-
nant stating that none of the owners
of land was to sell,'.rent or lease any
of their land to persons of Oriental
blood.
One of the landowners sold his land
to a Chinese family and the other
signers of the covenant brought ac-
tion to have the deed nullified.

Physicist Studies Simplest Living
Form; May Aid Cancer Research
The physicist's interest in the vi- Researchers are now reverting to

rus, the simplest form of living mat-
ter, was discussed last night by Prof.
Robley Williams of the physics de-
partment in a lecture before the Phi
Sigma society.
Virus is the filterable form of di-
sease, Prof. Williams said, and is the
cause of poliomelitis and influenza,
to mention two. The physicist tries
to get the virus in its simplest form,
he explained, which can be done by
either chemical or physical means.
The physical means, called "ultra-
centrifugation," involves operation
of the centrifuge at 50,000 revolu-
tions per minute.
The viruses about which most is
known, Prof. Williams pointed out,
are the tobacco mosaic and the to-
mato bushy stunt. They have been
more extensively studied because
they are obtainable in larger quan-
tities than any other.
There are 10 to the 18th power
viruses in one inch-a greater num-
ber than the seconds the universe
has existed to this day, according
to Prof. Williams.
The electronic microscope is resV-
ponsible for much that is now known
about viruses, the physicist said.
Capable of magnifying up to 100,-
000 times, it operates in a vacuum
and uses electrons instead of the
light employed by the ordinary mi-
croscope.
Hypnotist Will
Lecture Today
"Hypnosis-Its Medical and Ex-
perimental Applications" is the sub-
ject of a lecture to be given by Dr.
Milton H. Erickson, director of psy-
chiatric research and training at
the Eloise Hospital, at 8 p.m. today
in the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Dr. Erickson has spent many years
on experimental i esearch on that
technique of hypnotism. In addition
to his position at Eloise, he is profes-
sor of psychiatry at the Wayne Uni-
versity medical school. He holds the
diplomate in neuropsychiatry, is a
fellow of the American Psychiatric
Association and a member of the
American Psychological Association.
The Psychology Club has invited
all interested persons to attend.

a study of the simplest, most readily
available form of life in an attempt
to fit one more cog into the wheel of
research on one of the most complex
problems of modern science-cancer.
Prof. Robley C. Williams of the
physics department is studying plant
viruses under a three-year grant-in-
aid from the American Cancer So-
ciety. He hopes, in his work on the
simplest objects which may be laid
to be alive and grow, to shed light on
the general phenomenon of cell
growth and to find answers which
can be applied to research on the
growth of cancerous cells.
Study of the plant viruses was
made possible by the development of
the electron microscope, which al-
lows researchers to investigate the
shape and size of certain objects
with a degree of mainification and
clearness about 100-fold greater than
the best optical microscopes.
Before the electron microscope
came into use Prof. Williams pointed
out, scientists were unable either to
see or to photograph objects the
size of plant viruses, which are gi-
gantic molecules that cause the ma-
jority of plant diseases.
After growing the plants needed
and infecting them with the viruses,
Prof. Williams hopes to discover how
these relatively simple objects multi-
ply, why each specific virus always
reaches one certain size. what their
growth habitsare and whether or
not the process of growth can be
artificially changed.

Highlights
On Campus
Service Fraternity
Alpha Phi Omega, national serv-
ice fraternity, will hold an open
meeting today at 7:30 p.m. in Rm.
304, the Union.
A guest speaker will talk on scout-
ing following a brief business meet-
ing. Sidney Zilber, president, urges
anyone on campus interested in the
fraternity to attend the meeting.

Chess Club Meeting .
The student Chess Club
meet at 7:30 p.m. today in
302 of the Union.

will
Rm.

Weekly Center Tea . .
The International Center will hold
its weekly tea from 4 to 6 p.m. to-
day. All foreign students and friends
are invited to attend.
Phi Kappa Tau . ..
Phi Kappa Tau fraternity is re-
organizing after an inactive period
during the war.
Former members and others inter-
ested may contact Frank Kelly at
7918 or Matt Mann, faculty advisor,
at the I-M Building.

I

r

DANCE Sat. Night
Wine-Gar's 12-Pc. Band
"5th
ARMORY n

I

PARTY TIME IS NEAR
Is your organization
having a Xmas party?
If so, stop at the Balfour office
and see the grand selection of
favors and dance programs.
L. C. BALFOIJR OFFICE
802 South State Street
Tom and Meredith Suckling
Phone 9533

.

1

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

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"CENTENNIAL SUMMER"
with
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Linda Darnell
-and-
"THE CAT CREEPS"
Friday and Saturday
"THE RUNAROUND"
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WESTWARD"

North Main Opposite Court House
- Today and Friday -
Lum and Abner
"PARTNERS IN TIME"
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Buster Crabbe
"TERRORS ON HORSEBACK"

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COMES TO
ANN ARBOR.
TOMORROW - FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8th
MASONIC TEMPLE -- 8:00 P.M.
bill randle presents
... A JAZZ CONCERT...
CARLTON RYDING S SEXTET
JOE NORRIS QUARTET
DAVE LEVINE'S QUINTET B0t3 MAYREND'S TRIO
$1.20...at the Door... $1.20

FOR SALE
TUXEDO and TAILS for sale. Size 39 long.
See at 1134 Hutchins after 6:00. )21
FOR SALE: Tenor Sax and Alto Sax. Both
used. Tenor in good condition. Michael
Polovitz, 103 Lloyd House. Phone 2-4401.
)63
FOR SALE: Tuxedo Suit, size 38, single-
breasted. Fine buy at $25. 820 E. Ann,
Apt. 4, after 5:30 p.m. )62
ON; TWEED SUIT. Two sport Coats. Size
38. Pre-War. Reasonable. Outgrown-
not used. Call 2-0278. )17
FOR SALE: Two tuxedos-sizes 38 and 40.
One set of tails-size 40 short, complete
with accessories. Excellent condition.
Write Roger Johnson, 104 West Ganson,
Jackson, Mich. )11
FOR SALE: 3 almost new Hollywood Beds,
complete with mattresses. Call 2-3867
after 6 p.m.
1941 FORD COUPE for sale. Mercury en-
gine, 5,000 miles. Box 42, Michigan Daily.
FOR SALE: Beautiful home-raised canar-
ies, parakeets and finches, bird supplies
and cagcs. Male, Persian cat. 562 S. 7th
Phone 5330. )10
MISCELLANEOUS
MIDWAY Bicycle shop, 322 E. Liberty. We
have rebuilt used bikes for sale. Your
bike can be expertly repaired also. )56
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: Transportation to Kansas City
or vicinity, leaving Wednesday night,
Novcmber 27. Call or write Howard
Stephenson, 409 Allen-Rumsey, West
Quad. Phone 2-4401. )22
The Personality Hair Style
is blended and shaped
to your facial features.
Your choice of eight good Barbers.
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State and Michigan Theatres

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Parker exersharp pencil. Gray bot-
tom with silver top. Reward. Please call
Roberta, 9268. )66
LOST: Black and gold Waterman Pen on
campus. Sentimental gift. Call 2-4561,
504 Mosher. Reward. )65
LOST: One pair of striped black pants on
Friday, Nov. 1. Lost enroute from West
Quad to N.Y.C. Station. Finder please
contact Don Hoexter, 225 Wenley, 2-4401.
Reward. ) 68
LOST: Brown zipper wallet near William
and Maynard Tuesday. Papers valuable
to owner only. Finder please return to
420 Thompson or contact Eleanor Alash-
ain, 314 S. State, 7177. Reward! )5
LOST: Log Log Slide Rule. Black case. Nov.
4 in or near Rm. 447 W.E. or Rm. 7 Ec.
Reward. Herb Kahn, Dorm 18, Rm. 38,
W. Lodge. )3
FOUND: Cardigan Sweater, October 11 in
my car. Owner may redeem by identi-
fying location of car and paying for this
ad. Call at 407 Mason Hall: 11:00-12:00
A.M. )13
LOST: Parker 51 Pen, Friday, near Hutch-
ins Hall. '31ue, gold top, green ink.
Finder contact Irene Kay, 2558 Stock-
well. ,) 19
LOST: Gray Persian Cat. Red ribbon
around neck. Call 8612, ask for the
porter. ) 20
REWARD: $5.00, for lost address book,
black, 2x5; name on inner cover. Oliver
Comstock, 7443 Michigan Ave., Saline,
phone 184-F-13. )4
BUSINESS SERVICES
TUTORING in Mathematics by M.I.T.
graduate, class of '24. John Alden Buck-
ler, 115 Catherine St., Ypsilanti. Tel.
Ypsi 1987W and reverse charges. )16
CHUMLEE'S
FREE DELIVERY of your favorite sand-
wiches and beverages. Every day but
Monday. 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. Phone 2-6429.
)8
TYPING: Term papers, theses, manu-
scripts. Stenographic work. Call 7147,
9-12, 1:30-4:30. )63
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Half of a double room to be
shared by male student with car. ? mile
from city limits. Call 2-6328. )69

WANTED: Part-time work. Art School
graduate, experienced N.Y.-Phila. inter-
ior decorator. Grad student's wife. Can
type. Desire interesting position. Phone
2-7423. )2
WANTED: 2 or 3 tickets together to Mich.
State game. Call Charles Walker, 2-3384,
Thursday afternoon or evening, Friday
evening. )6
TALL, AWKWARD, unintelligent student
with LARGE BULBOUS NOSE desires
simple menial employment to suit men-
tality. Call Franklin Hogansberg, 4315.
)64
WANTED: Men's Full Dress Suit, Size 40
regular. Call F. C. Houston, Lawyers
Club. ) 67
WANTED: 4 Adjacent tickets for Mich.-
Wisconsin game, or 2 adjacent tickets for
same. Call Toni, 2-1956. )23
WANTED: Experiencedman or woman for
exclusive summer camp in Northern
Michigan. Must have specialty and
camp training. Write for appointment
giving details. Box number 7. )9
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A better
price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. . )14
HELP WANTED
MULTILITH OPERATOR. Part Time. Ex-
perienced. Apply The Edwards Letter
Shop. )12
WOULD LOW COST ATTRACTIVE, NOUR-
ISHING MEALS INTEREST YOU? Why
not work for a concern with a Company-
owned, non-profit cafeteria for operat-
ors, such as the Michigan Bell Telephone
Co. Eat meat at 18 cents a serving, sal-
ads for .12, vegetables for .08' to .10, des-
serts for .08 to .10, beverage for .05.
Snacks available on relief periods. At
the same time help your digestion by
eating in the pleasant company of our
congenial operators. Inquire about our
openings in operating positions by call-
ing 9900 or 9985. )15

WANTED

NFaOP+ MIC
tNp6 Nights
OGARTAND i
BOGARTAND B BOGART
BO

9 2-4 PM.
91 P.M

ACA

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Continuous
Da iy
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Weekdays
30c to 5 P.M.

STARTS TODAY

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1946-47 fec tube Cpow
Pr e s e ntis
LOUIS P.LOCHER
Noted Journalist and Author Recently Returned from Nazi
Trial; Head of Associated Press in Berlin 1926-1941.
"THE NUREMBERG TRIAL"

RIDER'FS
HOBBY SUPPLIES
302 South State Street

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