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October 31, 1946 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-31

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1946

Heifers for
Eurpe' Relief
Drive Planned
Campus Groups Will
Cooperate in Project
The Famine Relief Committee
made plans yesterday for a campus-
wide "Heifers for Europe" drive
which will begin next month.
In explaining the need for student
support of the "Heifers for Europe"
program, Chairman Seymour Gold-
stein pointed out that the discon-
tinuance of UNNRA at the end of
the year will leave most Europeans
on a sub-standard diet.
More than 25 representatives from
dormitories, church groups, fraterni-
ties, sororities, league houses, and
other campus groups are already at
work on the project and the com-
mittee is attempting to secure at
least one representative from every
group on campus.
The committee will meet again
next Tuesday..
New Members
Join Flying Club
Sixteen students were welcomed as
new members of the University Fly-
ing Club by Frances Hamilton, presi-
dent, at yesterday's meeting.
The memberships will become of-
ficial when new members pay their
dues. Anyone interested in joining
the club can contact Ann Guinan at
2-4516.
It was also announced at the meet-
ing that one of the club pilots was
reprimanded and fined for flying
illegally low over Ann Arbor last
week. In the future, members who
fly over the town at less than 1;500
feet will be expelled from the club,
according to a board of directors
ruling.
Ha a... Hal w... .
the Gang's all wearing

132 Enrolled
In Army, Navy
Reserve Units
In an effort to secure commissions
in the Army and Navy reserve pro-
grams, approximately 132 veteran
students, many with combat records,
have enrolled in the ROTC and
NROTC units.
A total of 32 veterans are now en-
rolled in NROTC, Lt.-Cmdr. Harry
Fitch, educational officer of the unit,
disclosed. Of these 32, 16 are Navy
veterans, 13 are former Marines, two
served in the Merchant Marine, and
one is a former G. I.
About 50 University students who
are former Navy and Marine pilots
are maintaining their commission in
the Naval Organized Air Reserve by
flying at Grosse Ile each weekend,
Capt. Richard Braun, USMC, dis-
closed. Capt. Braun led the squadron
of Navy fighter planes which put on
a show over the stadium Saturday
in honor of Navy Day. Some of the
pilots of the planes were University
students.
Of the 132 men enrolled in ROTC,
100 are veterans, Major Howard Por-
ter, professor of military science and
tactics in the unit, said. Broken down
these figures show that about 91 of
these men are Army veterans, six
are former Navy men, and three are
former Marines.

UNIVERSITY POLITICIANS:
Faculty Members Play Part in
Philippine Independence Story

TRIBESMEN STONE NEHRU'S MOTOR CONVOY--Tribesmen, some armed with rifles, stone Pandit Jaw-
aharlal Nehru's automobile convoy from an eight foot embankment near Landi Kotal, in the Khyber Pass,
India, during inspection tour of the tribal northwest provinces by the head of India's interim government.
Tribesmen were dispersed by Khyber riflemen. Attack was one of the three made on Nehru's convoy in trip
from Pashawar, capital of Northwest Frontier Province, to the Afghan frontier and back.

VETERANS'
NOTES

Correction: A Veterans Administra-
tion directive which reached the Uni-
versity Veterans Service Bureau this
week has reversed the decision on in-
come computations for teaching fel-
lows which was explained in this
column yesterday.
Superceding the former rulinp of
Mr. T. O. Hall of the Columbus
Branch Office, the new directive pro-
vides that the salaries of teaching
fellows are to be based on the school
year instead of the full calendar year.
The school year at the.University is
based on nine months. Thus if a
teaching fellow receives $150 per
month for nine months, his income
report, so far as his GI subsistence is
concerned, must be figured at $150
per month irrQspective of what he
does for the remainder of the year.

Panel To Study
lection Issues
Three amendments proposed for
the coming elections will be discussed
in a panel discussion open to all
students at 4:15 p.m. today n Room
316 of the Union.
Robert Ford, director of the Uni-
versity's Bureau of Government, will
act as chairman, with Prof. Arthur
W. Bromage, of the Political Science
Department and John Huss, of the
Michigan Municipal League, com-
pleting the panel.
The amendments under discussion
are the veterans' bonuses, diversion'
of sales tax, and construction of air-
ports. Following the discussion a
period will be allowed for questions
concerning the amendments.
This is the first in the series of de-
bates and discussions sponsored by
the house committee of the Union, of
which Gene Sikorovsky is chairman.
Senior Pictures..
Senior picture appointments
have been reopened. If any sen-
ior still wishes an appointment or
if he has missed his appointment,
he must call the 'Ensign office
between 1 and 5 p.m. today or be-
tween 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Friday.
This is the last chance for seniors
to have their pictures taken.

Campus Highlights

Argentine Movie . . . I
Jose Luis Reissig, transfer student
from Argentina, will discuss "The
Argentine Student Movement" and
show motion pictures during the
MYDA meeting at 4 p.m. today in the
Union.
Taken by Reissig, the films depict
students being driven from buildings
which they had previously taken in
protest against rulings of the Peron
government restrict in g academic
freedom.
* * *
Chess Club .. .
The student chess club will meet
at 7:30 p.m. today in Rm. 308 in
the Union.
The meeting is open to all inter-
ested students. Members are re-
quested to bring boards and chess-
men.
Hillel Dance . .
The B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
will conclude its membership drive
with a Hallowe'en Membership Dance
from 3:30 to 5 p.m. today at the
Michigan League.
Students will be admitted upon
presentation of membership cards.

Chaperones for the dance, a non-
date affair, will be Dr. and Mrs. Ed-
ward Blakeman and Mr. and Mrs.
Franklin H. Littell.
Halloween Party .
Jack-o-lanterns, skeletons,,
witches, black cats, and other Hal-
lowe'en decorations will lend at-
mosphere to the party for foreign
students and friends to be held at
7:30 p.m. today in the Interna-
tional Center.
Traditional refreshments of cider
and doughnuts will be served.
Dancing, bobbing for apples and
other games will be on the program.
AICE Meeting .. .
Prof. Donald W. McCready of the
chemical engineering department
will speak on plastics at the regular
meeting of the American Institute
of Chemical Engineers at 7:30 p.m.
today in Rm. 348 West Engineering
Building. The lecture will be ac-
companied by sound and color
movies.
* *
Talk on China ..*
Mrs. George A. Fitch, writer and
authority on China, will discuss
"China Today" at 7:30 p.m. Sun-
day in the International Center.
Born and educated in Michigan,
Mrs. Fitch has lived in China over
20 years, including three and a
half months which she spent there
last winter.
Mrs. Fitch is a contributing edi-
tor of the "China Monthly," vice-
president of the American China
Policy Association, and a member
of the Overseas Press Club of New
York.
* * *
Beta Phi Eta . . .
Beta Phi Eta, honorary speech fra-
ternity, will hold an important meet-
ing at 7:30 p.m. today in Angell Hall.
* * *
IRA TO Meet ...
The executive board of IRA will
meet at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the
Union, Hannah Gross, secretary,
announced.
* * * *
Vulcan Meeting
The first meeting in over a year of
the Vulcans, senior engineering hon-
or society, will take place at 6:30
p.m. Sunday in the Union.

The full story of the Philippine In-
dependence could not be told with-
out mention of the participation of
two University of Michigan faculty
men both in getting the Philippine
Independence Act through Congress
and in aiding to draft the Philippine
Constitution.
One of these men was the late Pro-
fessor Joseph Hayden of the Political
Science Department, who was on
leave of absence from the University
from 1933 to 1935 to serve as Lieu-
tenant Governor of the Philippines.
The other is Dean Emeritus Henry
M. Bates of the Law School who was
called upon )y Professor Hayden to
give certain legal opinions regarding
the status of the islands after the
U.S. invasion in 1945.
Dean Bates strongly believes
that Professor Hayden's influence
upon the Philippine Constitution
was great since it bears remark-
able resemblance to that of the
United States. He notes that many
of the suggested reforms for the
U.S. Constitution were incorporat-
ed, such as, the item veto, the
right of cabinet members to debate
in the Legislature, and only two
terms for the President. In other
respects, the Constitution is prac-
tically identical with that of the
United States.
The question arose alter the Amer-
ican reoccupation of the islands in
1945 whether the United States
could exercise sovereignty there since
the McDuffy-Tydings Act of 1934
provided for full independence in
1944. Lieutenant Governor Hayden
called upon his old friend and col-

league to give a legal opinion on this
knotty question.
"I felt from the beginning," Dean
Bates said, "that President Roose-
velt was within his constitutional
powers to authorize the invasion
and to exercise authority until
stable conditions could be reestab-
lished." Dean Bates then proceed-
ed to explain how he arrived at
his decision by comparing the ex-
ercise of Power by President Lin-
coln toward the reconquered Con-
federate States following the Civil
War. le pointed out that Presi-
dent Lincoln even appointed state
judges until the Confederate States
were restored to their former stat-
us in the Union.
Regarding the present status of
the Philippines, Dean Bates notes
that the Philippines still do not ex-
ercise complete sovereignty. Under
agreement with the United States,
the Federal Government reserves the
right to regulate Philippine finances
and to retain military and naval in-
stallations on the islands.
Diamonds
and
Wedding
4A s s Rings
t 717 North University Ave.
_-o~->o--0-O<=>< O:>

_

Continuous
Daily
from 1 P.M.

*NYET7/~/

Weekdays
30c to 5 P.M.

-STARTS TODAY-

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

LOST AND FOUND

RUGBY
SHAKERS
All the young "blades" who
cut a smart figure of style are
strutting in RUGBY Shaker
Sweaters.
They're easy . . . on the eyes
. . . body . . . and purse, and
we invite you in to look them
over and agree that you have a
place for one in your wardrobe.
$4.45 to $10.95
Rabideau-Harris
CLOTHIERS
119 SOUTH MAIN ST.

LOST: Large heavy silver religious medal.
In vicinity of Martha Cook or S.A.E.
House, Saturday night. Reward. Call
Bina Cady, 2-3225. )70
LOST-Woman's' opal ring in 'a ruby set-
ting, last Saturday. Reward. Call Jim
Skipper, Lawyer's Club, 4145. )35
LOST-Friday afternoon at P-Bell: Black
and Gold Parker Pencil, name inscribed.
Please call Milton Moscowitz, 4519. )7
LOST-A black Scottie dog answering
name Cinder. Some grey hair. Please
return or call. Mrs. E. G. Heisel, 632
Church. Phone 8825. Reward. )21
LOST: Narrow rhinestone bracelet between
I-M Building and Union Saturday
night. Reward. Box 29, Daily. )
LOST: Fur scarf. Two skins, stone martin,
at Illinois game. Reward. Phone 4328.
John E. Tracy, 24 Ridgway. )2
LOST: Will whoever took ladies brown
gabardine topcoat from ladies lounge in
League evening of Friday, Oct. 25, please
return to League Information Desk?
This coat is part of a 3-piece suit and
valuable to owner. )62
TAILORING and SEWING
CUSTOM MADE CLOTHES-Formals-Re-
modeling-Alterations. "Bring your sew-
ing problems to us." Hildegarde Shop,
116 E. Huron, 24669. )45
STUDENT SUPPLIES
302 South State Street

HELP WANTED
WOULD LOW COST ATTRACTIVE, NOUR-
ISHING MEALS INTEREST YOU? Why
not work for a concern with a Company-
owned, non-profit cafeteria for operat-
ors, such as the Michigan Bell Telephone
Co. Eat meat at 18 cents a serving, sal-
ads for .12, vegetables for .08 to .10, des-
serts for .08 to .10, beverage for .05.
Snacks available on relief periods. At
the same time help your digestion, by
eating in the pleasant company of our
congenial operators. Inquire about our
openings in operating positions by call-
ing 9900 or 9985. )15
GOOD DEAL! Eat five delicious meals
over this weekend for only three hours
work. Hurry! Call 2-1997 today or to-
night.
TYPIST and General Office Work. Must
be accurate at figures. Oall 9861. )9

FOR SALE
1941 PLYMOUTH SEDAN. Call 5680 be-
tween 6 and 8 p.m. Ask for Len or Bob.
)74
FOR SALE: Formal. Size 13. Brand new.
Perfect for campus dances. About $18.00.
Marion Kaut, Apt. 66, Veterans Housing
Project. )71
NEW RADIO-PHONOGRAPHS in carrying
case. Idealefor student use. At former
ceiling price. Call H. Kaufman, 2-6636,
evenings. ) 72
ENGLISH BIKES: Girl's Phillips and boy's
Humber. Three-speed. Call afternoon
4:30 to 6:00, at 727 So. Division. )10
NEED AN APARTMENT? Have a 2-familS
house for sale which has one apartment
vacant. Reasonable terms. Oril Fergu-
son, Realtor, 928 Forest Ave, Phone
2-2839. )12

BOWMAN CHAPMAN
Also
MARCH OF TIME COLOR CARTOON
"THE NEW FRANCE" WORLD NEWS

-I

_ i

Sunday!

"IF I'M LUCKY"

IF

STENOGRAPHER and general office work. FOR SALE: Man's bicycle. New tires. Good
Must be neat and accurate. Call 9861. )8 condition. Call 2-6173. Ask for Blake.)60

. ..
.....

MICHIGAN
Through Saturday
AN ALL-FUN..,
ALL-I... R
ALL-LAFF SHOW!
5i'sig :wi~ iN.t

FIVE PEOPLE, men or women, to call on
small merchants. Daily commissions.
Apply in person. Helpful if taking
bookkeeping or accounting. 538 N. Di-
vision. Income Tax Control Commission.
)48
WANTED: Delivery boys for Michigan
Daily. Good pay. Apply Circulation Dept.
Student Publications Bldg., 420 Maynard
St., or call 2-3241. )13
MISCELLANEOUS
MIDWAY Bicycle shop, 322 E. Liberty. We
have rebuilt used bikes for sale. Your
bike can be expertly repaired also. )56
WANTED
WANTED: Three tickets to Minn.-Mich.
game. Phone Larry Stratton at 2-4401.
)61
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A better
price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. . )14
PERSONAL
DESIRE RIDE to Columbus, Ohio on Nov.
22. Will share expenses. Call Joan Rakov,
2-0849. )20
PERSONAL: Wanted ride to Indianapolis
Friday noon. Will share expenses. R. C.
O'Connor, 4145 Lawyers Club. )73
HALLOWEEN SPREE. All welcome at the
Black Cat Ball, Friday, Nov. 1, at the
Union. ) 75

FOR RENT
WILL EXCHANGE new two-bedroom un-
furnished apartment in Detroit for nice
apartment in Ann Arbor. Call 2-3920. )6
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING: Term papers, theses, manu-
scripts. Stenographic work. Call 7147,
9-12, 1:30-4:30. )63
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED TO BUY: Tuxedo or tails. Size
42-44 Long. Call 2-1371. )38
TRANSPORTATION
THREE GIRLS want rides to Grand Rapids
Friday afternoon. Will pay. Call Ellen
Mulvihill, 2-4561. ) 1

11

Last Day Today
OUR HEARTS WERE
GROWING UP
with Gail Russell, Diana Lynn
and
THE SEVENTH VEIL
-- Friday andNSaturday --
THE RETURN OF
FRANK JAMES
and
FREDDIE STEPS OUT_

"1

The Only

iln
TECHNICOLOR
? Virginia Mayo
Vera-Ellen
The Goldwyn Grls

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COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
in An Arbor
Our services are at your disposal
regardless of who fitted your glasses
or where they were fitted.
"Contact Fluid that guarantfces
8-12 hours wear."

Send her

FLOWERS
for the

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