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September 24, 1946 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-09-24

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WEDNESDAl;Y, SEPT'EMB'ER 2 , 94G

TUHE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE T

Cardinals Gain Half Game

Top Reds as Rain Halts Burns;
Detroit Clinches Second Place

NATIONAL LEAGUE PENNANT
RACE AT A GLANCE
By The Associated Press

<4

W L
St. Louis .......95 55
Brooklyn .......94 56
Games to play-St.
Brooklyn, 4.

.633 GB
.633 ..-.
.627 1
Louis, 4;

Remaining games:
St. Louis: Home-Cincinnati, 1
(Sept. 25); Chicago 3 (Sept. 27,
28, 29). Total 4. Away-None.
Brooklyn: Home-Philadelphia 2
(Sept. 25, 26); Boston 2 (Sept. 28,
29). Total 4., Away-None.
* * *
ST. LOUIS, Sept. 24 - (P)-Erv
Dusak's ninth home run into the left
field bleachers gave the St. Louis
Cardinals a 2-1 victory over Cincin-
nati tonight that stretched their Na-
tional League lead over idle Brooklyn
to one full game.
The Cards had tied the ball game
up in the ninth after being blanked
for eight innings with two hits when
Stan Musial singled to right field
scoring pinchhitter Joffre Cross from
second base.
Ed Lukon's single scoring Claude
Corbitt from second base in the
fourth inning gave Cincinnati's John-
ny Vandermeer a 1-0 lead after
George Munger had tossed three hit-
less innings of ball for the Cards.
The score
Cincinnati 0 0 0 100 0 0 0 0-1 7 01
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1-2 4 0
Vandermeer and Mueller; Munger,,
Wilks (10) and Klutz.

DETROIT, Sept. 24 - (iP) -
Stretching their longest winning
streak of the year to 10 straight
games, the Detroit Tigers slapped
the St. Louis Browns 4 to 3 and 10 to
1 to sweep a twin bill today as Hank
Greenberg clouted three homers to
grab the league lead with 41.
The double victory cljnched the
American League's runner-up berth
for the Tigers, 1945 champions.
Greenberg's 39th homer, which put
him one-up on Ted Williams in their
torrid race for the slugging cham-
pionship, broke up the first game
after one was out in the Detroit ninth
and brought Freddie 'Hutchinson his
14th win.
Two more drives into the upper
deck in left field off Ellis Kinder in
the nightcap put Hank over the 40-
mark in home runs for third time in
his 11-year Big League career. Roy
Cuflenbine and Dizzy Trout also hom-
ered in the nightcap as Trout scat-
tered five hits for his 17th pitching
triumph.
In addition to going three ahead of
Williams in the homer derby, Green-
berg drove across five Detroit runs in
the two'games to catch Ted in the
RBI department with 120.
The score:
St. Louis 000.0 0 0.3 0 0- 3 7 3
Detroit .. 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1- 4 6 2
Zoldak, Moss and llelf; Hutchinson
and Tebbetts.
St. Louis 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0- 1 5 0
Detroit 0 1 2 0 3 1 2 1 x-10 14 0
Kinder, Muncrief, Ferens, Johnson
and Moss, Helf; Trout and Swift.

I e e '' u r I ir
Our personnel is. ready to serve
you with the Ieitest hair styes and <> :::::::.:..:.;;::.:. ''°'
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HAND-SEVIi'N MOCCASIN
Closest to barefoot" freedom -°., .,n
Sportst rs' hand-sewn moccasins cradle .your foot at e+iery
step. Proud product of talented craftsmen . , ,

Illinois, Irish
Clash in Top
Saturday Battle
Young and Company
Loaded for Revenge
CHAMPAIGN, Ill., Sept. 24-P)-
A record crowd of 70,000 will jam
Memorial Stadium Saturday in hopes
of seeing a modern counterpart of
Illinois' famed Galloping Ghost in
super-speedy Buddy Young, and in-
vading Notre Dame is not scoffing
the possibility.
The Untested Irish of Frank Leahy
only know of Harold (Red) Grange
from somewhat ancient football his-
tory, but they are only too familiar
with Halfback Young, a Mr. Five-
by-Five with mercurial heels.
Buddy Old Jinx
The first time Notre Dame en-
countered Young was in 1944 when
the Negro star was a freshman. And
the first time Buddy got his hands on
the ball against the Irish, he streak-
ed 74 yards for a touchdown. *
Much yardage has rolled under
Young's swift legs since that time.
He finished the 1944 season with 13
touchdowns, equalling Grange's sing-
le-season record at Illinois. Last year,
he cavorted for the Navy's Fleet City,
I-M NEWS
All independents on campus are
strongly urged to organize teams
for. the. coming. fall .intramural
sports program. Touch football will
commence as soon as possible,
along with basketball and hand-
ball.
All men interested in entering
teams should call Dave Matthews
at the Intramural Building, leav-
ing the name of one man as their
representative. There will be a
meeting of all independents inter-
ested in organizing teams at a fu-
ture date to be designated on The
Daily sports page.
Calif., eleven and amaed Pacific
Coast fans with his darting speed
and paydirt prancing.
Win Opener
As the Illini opened their season
with a 33-7 win over Pittsburgh last
Saturday, Young galloped 46 yards
for a touchdown on the second
scrimmage play and later contrib-
uted his shortest touchdown run, a
two-yard end skirt.
In the words of Leahy, whose for-
midable line has been impressed al-
most daily in practice with the need
of smacking down Young, the Illi-
ni scooter is "dynamite, absolutely
terrific."
Notre Dame, according to Leahy,
has no break-away runner to match
Ydung, or even Julie Rykovich, 1943
Irish star, who is Young's half-back
running mate.
Talent Aplenty
Both the Irish and Illini forward
walls are studded with bruising ex-
servicemen and will .average more
than 210 pounds. Beyond the explo-
sive speed of Young and the heralded
passing of Notre Dame's Johnny Lu-
jack at quarterback, the game well
may be decided up front.
The Irish unveiling probably will
find ex-Navy Jack Zilly and Mar-
ine Jim Martin at ends; Ziggy Czar-
obski, 1943 regular back from the
Navy, and George Conner, Holy
Cross transfer and another ex-sail-
or, at tackles; Bill Fischer and hold-
over Fred Rovai at guaids; and ex-
servicemen Marty Wendell or George
Strohmeyer at center.
Leahy said his starting backfield
would include a quartet of former
servicemen, including Lujack, 1943
regular back from the Navy; half-
backs Bob Livingstone and Emil Sit-
ko, ex-Army and Navy respectively;
and fullback Jim Mello, Navy veter-
an.

Kurtsinger Succumbs
LOUISVILLE, Ky., Sept. 24.--(P')-
Death today ended the career of
39-year-old Charles F. Kurtsinger,
who rode to fame i nthe Kentucky
Derby with Twenty Grand and War
Admiral.

-DES SE
' Hoosier Upset Stuns Fais
Wolverines Seek Revenge
By DES JIOWARTH, Associate Sports Editor
Long before the current football season got under way it was freely
predicted that this would be the gridiron sport's greatest year with every
team loaded with talent and big games highlighting every week-end. It was
also predicted that upsets would be as frequent as September showers.
However, few of the prognosticators expected the season to be ush-
ered in with such a resounding upset as that which occurred in Bloom-
ington last Saturday when little heralded Cincinnati University knocked
off ihdiana's Hoosiers 15-6.
What caused the Hoosiers-last year's Conference champs-to bow to
the little Ohio school may be one of the season's biggest mysteries. Or it may
be cleared up this coming Saturday when Indiana opens defense of its title
against Michigan at the Stadium. As a result of the loss Coach Bo Mac-
Millin's eleven will enter the contest as slight underdogs. How well they
perform against the Wolverines will determine just how big an upset Cin-
cinnati's victory really was.
All who witnessed the game admitted that the Hoosiers looked
anything but sharp. But despite this fact they cannot be considered a
pushover and no one knows this better than Fritz Crisler. For the past
two years the Wolverines have rated as favorites and both times Indiana
has pulled a surprise. Last year's game incidentally proved the deciding
contest in the Big Nine race
It's no secret that those two defeats have rankled Crisler and the Wol-
verines no little bit. Michigan is definitely gunning for a win over Indiana
this year. It is doubtful if the Maize and Blue mentor is going to let the
squad relax because of the Hoosier's poor showing Saturday. Although Mac-
Millin's squad may have been overrated by the pre-season dopesters it cer-
tainly can't be eliminated from consideration in this year', Big Nine title
chase.
The Hoosiers still have one of the best fullbacks in the country in
Pete Pihos and an equally good passer in Ben Raimondi. Pihos named
on several All-American teams last year spearheads the ground attack.
Raimondi masterminds the T-formation from the quarterback spot and
last season led the conference passers. Supplementing this pair are
backs Mel Groomes Dick Deranek, and Harry Jagade, all lettermen.
The line, except for the ends is as strong as last year's championship
squad.
Loss of All-American ends, Ted Kluszewski and Bob Ravensberg, and
tailback George Taliaferro have weakened the Hoosiers considerably as was
shown in the Cincinnati game. However, several factors may have been
responsible for that defeat, including overconfidence, and this Saturday the
"Champs" may return to somewhere near the form they displayed last year.
If they do fans can expect to see a really exciting ball gamre. Still we're con-
vinced that our Wolverines are a couple of touchdowns better than Mac-
Millin's crew this year.
ODDS AND ENDS
With seven home games scheduled the Wolverines will be playing
their most Ann Arbor engagements since the Stadium opened in 1927.
Since a sell-out crowd of 87,000 is already assured for the Armny game
it's a cinch that the all-time home attendance record will be broken.
Which is one reason so few good seats are available for students. Last
year's record over-all total of 516,000 may also fall since the Wolverines
play two away games at Minnesota and Ohio State, with a combined
capacity of 136,000 at the two stadia.
.Speculation as to whether. Elmer Madar will be available for
the Indiana contest will probably prevail right up until game time. Madar,
one of Michigan's famed "Seven Oak Posts" of the '42 season, by his own
admission doesn't know either. All I know is what the doctors tell me, and
that's not much."_'

Hoosiers Prep for t''
BLOOMINGTON, Ind., Sept. 24 -
(A)-Bill Armstrong of Evansville
worked out at the left halfback spot
today as Indiana drilled intensively
for its Western Conference opener
with Michigan Saturday. Coach Bo
McMillin indicated he was pleased
with Armstrong's performance and
probably would start him in the tail-
back assignment.
Russell Deal and Jim Dewar, who
were injured in the game with Cin-
cinnati, were back in the lineup.
The Hoosiers stressed against left-
handed passing, of which they expect
to see plenty from Michigan's Paul
White. Southpaw Bob Cowan imper
sonated White in the workout.
* * *
Bosox Nip Yanks
BOSTON, Sept. 24-(P)-The pen-
nant winning Boston Red Sox ended
whatever chances the New York Yan-
kees had of finishing in second place
by nosing out the Yanks, 5-4, today.
The third place Yanks now trail
the runner-up Detroit Tigers by more
than four games and have only four
left to play while the Bengals have
five,
Southpaw Mickey Harris went the
- -

Highlights in the Sports World

-DAY
SERVICE
on
DRY CLEANING
IF BROUGHT IN TO EITHER OF OUR STORES ON
MONDAYS, TUESDAYS OR WEDNESDAYS.
'~.may

oute for the Red Sox and scattered
ntine hits ini posting his 17th win as
against eight defeats.
*i *
Tfop Crowd Expected
EAST LANSING, Sept. 24 -(P)-
Michigan State College's largest
opening date crowd in history will at-
tend the football game here Satur-
day against Wayne, L. L. Frimodig,
Assistant Athletic Director, predicted
today.
Frimodig estimated that on the
basis of pre-season ticket sales, a
crowd of over 21,000 should be on
hand for Saturday's game, if the
weather is good. The largest previ-
ous opening date crowd was in 1939,
when 20,610 saw the Wayne-State
game.
A sellout crowd of nearly 25,000 is
not impossible, Frimodig said.
All varsity golfers on the campus
are asked to contact Coach Bill
Barclay as soon as possible. He will
be at the University Golf Course in
the mornings. A 72-hole medal
tournament is being planned for
this fall; the results will partially
decide the make-up of next sea-
son's squad.

Ma or League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

St. Louis ......
Brooklyn ......
Chicago .......
Boston ........
Philadelphia ...
Cincinnati .....
Pittsburgh .....
New York ......

Wv
95
94
79
78
68
63
61
58

L
55
56
69
71
82
86
87
91

.633
.633
.627
.534
.527
.453
.423
.412
.389

GB
1
15
16
27
311/
33
36

Fall Tennis Tourney
Begins October 6
Tennis enthusiasts will have an op-
portunity to wind up their current
season's racket activity on Friday,
Oct. 6, when the All-Campus Fall
Tennis Tournament will get under-
way on the Ferry Field courts.
The competition is limited to any
undergraduate who has never earned
a college letter.
Applicants are requested to report
to the Intra-mural Building before
3:00, Wednesday, Oct. 4.
The tournament will be directed by
Mr. H. F. Breman, director of Intro-
mural athletics and appropriate
prizes will be awarded to the winners.

S Brothers
B t h.

I

U

STORES AT

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
St. Louis 2, Cincinnati 1
Philadelphia at Brooklyn, rain
Boston at New York, rain
Chicago 13, 0, Pittsburgh 3, 13
AMERICAN LEAGUE

214 S0. STATE ST.

- 1 15 S0. UN IVERSITY

6

Boston .......
Detroit ........
New York..... .
Washington ...
Chicago .......
Cleveland ......
St. Louis......
Philadelphia ...

W
102
90
85
71
71
66
64
49

L
48
59
66
77
79
84
85
lOt

.633
.680
.604
.563
.480
.473
.440
.430
.329

GB
111
17!
30
31
36
37/
521%

14

/

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 4, 10, St. Louis 3, 1
Boston 5, New York 4
Only games scheduled.

ATTENTION:
Sororities, Fraternities,
Campus OrganiZations
SOUND SYSTEMS RENTED
for
Banquets, Parties, Dances
Latest Popular Records
OPERATOR FURNISHED WITH NEWEST-

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um
* Last season Coach-of-the-Year Bo
McMillin led Indiana University to its
first Big Ten football championship.
Though the victim of a stunning upset
in its first game last Saturday, will
' Indiana still be the top team in the
Conference? Win or lose, Bo won't
have to worry about his job. For, at
Indiana. he's something more than a
football coach - he's an institution.
Don't miss the fascinating story of this
most colorful coach in today's Saturday
Evening Post.
The Missing Man of the Year
by W. F. FOX, Jr., and ROBERT A. COOK

K

0
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B
0

HA RRY
9ALTZMAN
PHOTO

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....Wa a -m = L

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