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October 22, 1946 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-22

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1946

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

i

Homecoming Dance
Tickets Will Be Sold
Sale To Be Held at Union, League, 'U' Hall
'Welcome Back, Alumni' Will Be Theme

Tickets for the Homecoming
Dance, to be presented from 8:30
p.m. to midnight Saturday in the In-
tramural Building, will be sold at
the Union, League and in the ,booth
outside Rm. 1, University Hall until
they are all gone.
Hours of the sale will be from 9
FRESHMAN
Q UEr7RIES
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the fourth in a
series of articles in which the Office of
the Dean of Women answers questions
asked by freshmen women during the
orientation period.
. Question: "What are the rules,
hours, and social opportunities for
women who live in their own or pri-
vate homes in Ann Arbor?"
Answer: Women living in private
homes, either in their own homes or
in rented rooms, have all the obliga-
tions and privileges of student gov-
ernment. This means that they are
expected to observe closing hours,
the only exception being that their
parents give the special permissions.
It is necessary for the woman stu-
dent to have a letter of approval
from heriparents before she may live
in a private home other than her
own, since it is no longer possible for
the University to . inspect all these
homes.
It is. more difficult for women liv-
ing in private, homes to make social
contacts than for those living in or-
ganized residences, unless theymake
a special effort to make friends in
their classes and on campus. They
must also take more initiative in
signing up for League and Assembly
activities.
These women are automatically
members of Suomynona, that branch
of Assembly which takes in all wom-
en living in private homes. This or-
ganization was established for the
purpose of providing an opportunity
for women living in private homes
to meet each othernand women liv-
ing in private homes are urged to take
advantage of its services. Women may
obtain further information about
Suomynona in the Undergraduate
Office of the League.
WAA Qolf Club
To Meet Today
The Golf Club will meet at 5 p.m.
today in the WAB Lounge.
Plan for a putting contest will be
explained at this meeting. The put-
ting contest will be held from 3:30
to 5 p.m. tomorrow and Thursday on
the putting green outside the WAB.
Each participant will have a
chance to putt around the green
twice. The person with the smallest
number of strokes will win the first
round. The person who has made
the most improvement over her first
score will win the second round.
Betsy Moore, club manager, urges
that everyone interested come to to-
day's meeting. Members are asked
to bring 25 cents dues for prizes
through the year.
Soph Cabaret News
Today is the last day that members
of the finance committee of Soph
Cabaret will collect class dues.
They will visit all dormitories,
league houses, sorority houses and
private homes where sophomore
coeds are living.
The entire central committee of
Soph Cabaret will meet at 5 p.m. to-
day in the Garden Room in the
League.
* * *
The Production Unit of the Cab-
aret will meet at 5 p.m. tomorrow in

the ABC Rooms in the League,

p.m. to noon every day, and from 1
to 4 p.m. every day except Satur-
day. The dance will be informal and
is open to all University students.
The first big all-campus affair of
the semester, the Homecoming Dance
will climax Michigan's 1946 Home-
coming Weekend centered around
the Illinois-Michigan football game.
Lawrence To Play
Elliot Lawrence, 21 year old pian-
ist, and his 20-piece orchestra will
play for the Homecoming Dance.
Lawrence has recently become one
of the top-flight dance bands. Rosa-
lyn Patton and Jack Hunter are the
vocalists for the band, and Alex Fila
is featured on the trumpet.
Lawrence has ten years of band
leading experience behind him, and
he began his career at the age of 11.
Since then he has directed bands in
grade school, high school and col-
lege.
After graduation from college, Law-
rence was chosen for the position of
musical director of WCAU in Phila-
delphia. In 1945 the "Listen to Law-
rence" program was inaugurated on
WCAU and was soon broadcast
coast-to-coast. His band later ap-
peared on the "Treasury Bandstand"
program, Sunday afternoons. Recent-
ly his band was held over for five
weeks at a Pennsylvania hotel.
Band Rated High
Lawrence placed third this year in
the annual College Music Poll and his
band was given "odds" by Billboard
Magazine to be a "New top name be-
fore another year goes by." Thesame
magazine gave him credit for the
simplicity of his arrangements which
blend popular styling with a sym-
phonic tone. He "plays much on the
sweet, smooth side even late in the
evening," according to the same ar-
ticle.
New Positions
Announced
By Assembly
The names of appointees for vari-
ous Assembly positions were an-
nounced today by Jeanne Clare,
president of the Association.
Members of the central committee
for League House Dances will be as
follows: Blanche Berger, 909 East
University, general chairman; Gladys
Relkin, 909 East University, assistant
chairman; Shirley Rich, 909 East
University, publicity; Ruth Jadrosich,
1036 Oakland, assistant publicity;
and Elizabeth Meyers, 724 University,
entertainment.
The list of other chairman in-
cludes: Rosalyn Long, Martha Cook,
Coke Bar chairman; Barbara Berk-
man, Stockwell, assistant chairman;
Regina Gruen, Stockwell, Teas chair-
man; Patricia Gurr, Stockwell, as-
sistant Teas chairman: Dorothea
Mountz, Martha Cook, assistant so-
cial chairman; Iris Yoder, Mosher,
Fresh Air Camp Tag Day chairman;
and Mary Quiatt, Martha Cook, as-
sistant Project chairman.
Light Lunches
SOUPS
... SALADS
. . . SANDWICHES
COKES
8:00 A.M.-10:30 P.M.
Weekdays
8:00 A.M-12:30 P.M.
Friday-Saturday
}
Clark's Tea Room
217 Observatory

........ .......

ROSALYN PATTON-One of the vocalists featured with Elliot Lawr-
ence's orchestra, which will play for the Homecoming Dance, from
8:30 p.m. to midnight, Saturday in the Intramural Building.

FILIPINO COED:

Barbour Scholarship Provisions
Help Botanist To Continue Studies

Tickets On Sale
For Assembly
Annual Event
Tickets are now on sale at league
houses, dormitories, and at the
League, for the traditional Recog-
nition Night, sponsored by Assembly
Association, to be presented at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday, October 29, in the
League Ballroom.
The annual event, which replaces
the pre-war Assembly Banquet, is
sponsored for independent women to
recognize individual scholastic and
activity achievements.
This year, scholastic awards will
be presented by Ira M. Smith, Reg-
istrar of the University, to the two
women in each class who have at-
tained the highest scholastic aver-
age during the past year.
Ellen Hill, president of the League,
will present awards to the two coeds
in the sophomore, junior, and senior
classes, who have been most out-
standing in extra-curricula activities.
Those women who receive honors will
have their names added to the plaque
on which are recorded the names of
independent coeds who have been
honored in the past.
Members of the central commit-
tee for the affair are as follows:
Margaret Thompson, general chair-
man; Irma Eichhorn, assistant
chairman; Lillian Winquist, pub-
licity; Ann Schoonmaker, assistant
publicity; Jean Engstrom, tickets;
and Nancy Schlademan, assistant
tickets.
The list continues with Maxine
Burkoff, decorations; Dorothea
Mountz, refreshments; Mary Quiatt,
programs; Barbara Hitchcock, pa-
trons; Ruth Humphreys, scholar-
ship; Frances Bull, activities; and
Phyllis Vandenburg, finance.
New Dance Class
For Intermediates
To Open at League
Due to the overwhelming turnout
at the dncing classes, a new class
will open for intermediates from 8 to
9 p.m. tomorrow in the League Ball-
room.
"Because of our full waiting lists,
the new class will be open only to
those who signed for it last week, and
who should be on hand to register at
the appropriate time on October
23," Shirley Mattern, dance chair-
man, said.
The times for the dancing classes
will be 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesdays
for beginners; 7 to 8 p.m. and 8 to
9 p.m. Wednesdays for intermediates.
Students on campus have found
the idea of improving their dancing
pleasing, and the classes which the
League Committee intended to limit
to 75 couples, were obliged to open
enrollment to 100 couples. Women
are urgently needed for assistant
teachers. Everyone interested is re-
quested to report tonight and tomor-
row night in the League Ballroom.
Regular activity credit will be re-
ceived for this service.

C
I f~ r
in
cl
rr r in
---- sw
DON'T SIT
BY THE FIRE
but come into EIBLER'S to make
your choice of a new compact
from our latest shipment. We
have them in jeweler's bronze and
sterling silver, up to $35.00

OLLEGE DAYS
a fluff of angora. Campus
othes from the CAMPUS SHOP
clude luscious white angora
weaters, socks, and mittens.

-1

*

*

By DOROTHY SIMON
Thanks to the provisions of the
Barbour Scholarships, one more de-
serving foreign student is able to
continue her education here. She is
Miss Petronila C. Marasigan from
Manila, P.I., and is doing graduate
work in botany.
Miss Marasigan received the schol-
arship in 1941, but due to the war.
she was unable to come here until
this year. She graduated from the
College of Pharmacy at the Univer-
sity of Philippines, and after receiv-
ing her master's degree, became an
instructor in botany there. Since oth-
er members in her department were
graduates of the University of Mich-
igan, she knew of the opportunities
offered here. The head of the De-
partment of Botany at Michigan was
an exchange professor at the Uni-
versity of Philippines for one year.
Miss Marasigan was working under
him, and after learning more about
the work done here, she became
more enthused.
So with the end of the war,, her
hopes became a reality. On July
23, she landed by plane in San
Francisco and then traveled by
train across the United States.
While riding through the West,
she was impressed by the endless
expanses of low plains. "All the
wide, wide lands made me see how
big the United States really is!", she
exclaimed.
Miss Marasigan visited several of
the large Eastern cities before com-
ing to Ann Arbor-Pittsburgh, where
she attended a Botanical Convention,
Philadelphia, Washington, and fin-
ally New York. "One can learn very
much in New York," she said. "When
you see it, you can't forget it." She

5

visited the Museum of Natural His-
tory, the Public Library, the Zoo,
and rode to the top of the Empire
State Building. Manila has no mu-
seum or botanical gardens, although
at present plans are under way for
their construction. The only thing
that put a damper on her visit was
that she got lost twice in the sub-
ways !
On September 16, Miss Marasi-
gan, with mixed feelings of antici-
pation and bewilderment, arrived
by train in Ann Arbor, and was met
at the station by her friends al-
ready attending the University. The
method of registration and proce-
dure in classes is the same here as
at the University ,of Philippines, so
she had very little trouble in be-
coming orientated.
There are 3,000 students enrolled
in the University of Philippines, and
each applicant must take an entrance
examination before he is admitted.
Honor students from high school,
however, are' not required tb take the
examination. Miss Marasigan en-
joyed her years there very much, al-
though the microscopes and other
equipment can't be compared to our
facilities.
The method of instruction at the
University of Philippines did not
change during the Japanese oc-
cupation. Miss Marasigan's room-
mate, Consuelo Damaso from Ilo
Ilo City on the Banay Islands and
a graduate student in English lit-
erature, also taught at the univer-
sity. She states, "I still taught my
pupils 'In Flander's Field since
it was on the curriculum, and there
was nothing they could do about
it."

\
HOT DOG
For the first time in four year
the VAN AKKEREN KNIT SRO
725 North University, announc
that it just received 100% Fren
angora in white, pink, yellow ar
blue.
A1

HEAR YE! HEAR YE!
Dry hair problems can now be
corrected at home with shampoo,
lotions, and cream, by Breck.
CALKINS-FLETCHER has this
remedy to solve your difficulties.
rs,
es
ch
AFTER A HARD
DAY'S WORK
the scent that refreshes - Eau
de cologne in Dee Chevalier by
D'Orsay. Stop by the QUARRY
DRUG for a bottle today. Can be
purchased in a. set, including soap.

-DAY
SERVICE

11111

0 il
SQUTALITY PAINT NG

Christmas
CARDS!

on
DRY CLEANING
IF BROUGHT IN TO EITHER OF OUR STORES ON
MONDAYS, TUESDAYS OR WEDNESDAYS.
w 561t~j1
o 41

9 0
7nt alrzer
Dry perfume makes your
favorite Roger & Gallet
fragrance go farther. Its
tantalizing scent is released
gradually when patted di-
rectly on warm skin. A dash
in the hem of your dance
dress fills the air with fade-
less perfume. Doused inside
your blouse, the effect is
really terrific! Use it regu-
larly-in all ways-just like
liquid perfume.

GET HEP

I

DOWNTOWN
SAVE MONEY! Shop in an old established firm for your cards.
Hundreds of styles, thousands of cards in stock ready to be
sold with-
YOUR NAME PRINTED
on every card, in exclusive design. Priced:
.1 CARDS AND ENVELOPES Oflig a ud u

TO THE JIVE!
Show up at the Saturday night
dances with a purse and pair of
gloves from the complete collec-
tion of styles and fabrics at the
ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP.
a E

''w- --- -+rr.
1 .
.Q' - _
" , !

A

p

v

__®

OUR LOCATION SAVES YOU MONEY
Cards also sold WITHOUT name printed if desired

VER SEE A
)REAM TALKING?

iii r

iG

1111

I

I a jaw,/

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