100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 24, 1946 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

F't UR TEEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Z'U1%: [)A" ", SI?,P'I'CI 1L'E4i ;4, I9 6

FOURTEEN TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER Z4, 1946

IE YEAR OLD:

Problems Confront Vets
Housed at Willow Village

HOMES WITH WHEELS:
Trailer Village Is Proposed
As Stop-Gap IHousing Measure

Willow Village is one year old this
fall-so far as its use as a University
stop-gap housing measure is con-
cerned.
Acquisition of Willow Village units
last fall enabled the University to
open its doors to hundreds of addi-
tional veterans, but the inevitable re-
sult has been a "campus away from
campus"-with attendant problems
for the veterans who cannot find liv-
ing accommodations elsewhere.
Although the rents are very reas-
onable in this low-cost project, (an
En ineers Plan
To Reestabhsh.
Honor System
Students in the College of Engi-
neering, backed by the Engineering
Council, will attempt to reestablish
the Honor System for all classes this
semester.
Inaugurated in 1916 as the result
of a student petition to the faculty,
the Honor System was discontinued
for undergraduates in 1944 by stu-
dent request because of the large
number of transfer students who en-
rolled here unacquainted with the
system.
Under the Honor System, written
quizzes and examinatioins are un-
proctored and the student is required
to write and sign the pledge: "I have
neither given nor received aid during
the examinatioin."
Students who observe members of
the class cheating on an examination
are expected to warn the violators,
and, if they persist, to report them
to the Student Honor Committee and
testify as to the details of the viola-
tion.
The Honor Committee investigates
all infractions, obtains evidence, and
decides upon guilt and punishment,
which may be anything up to and in-
cluding expulsion.
Decisions of the Honor Committee
have never yet been reversed by the
faculty, although the sentence has
occasionally been lightened.
Veterans' Insurance
Under the revised terms of Nation-
al Service Life Insurance veterans
may now convert to any one of six
types of permanent plans, the Vet-
erans Administration announced. The
six types are: ordinary life, 30-pay
life, 20-pay life, and three endow-
ment plans.

important item for the veterans liv-
ing on meager subsistence allow-
ances) the Village has in many ways
proven less desirable than lodging
on the campus itself.
The most unpleasant aspect of
iving there, according to the Vil-
lagers, is the twelve-mile distance
from the campus, which consumes at
least one precious hour a day in bus
travel. Strong criticism from the
single men about the curtailment of
their campus social life has brought
from the University a promise to
provide a more frequent scheduling
of buses for the fall, particularly
during the evening hours, when there
formerly existed a three-hour lapse
in service.
"The place looks like an army
camp," is another frequent com-
ment of'the vets, and indeed, any
white barracks-like dormitories of
ex-serviceman approaching the
the community center of "West
Lodge," the home of the single
men, would scarcely be surprised
to see a couple of MP's and a group
of GI's at the entrance.
The single men's dormitories at
West Lodge are particularly reminis-
cent of the regimented life of the
service and many of the vets feel that
this, coupled with the long distance
from the campus proper, has pre-
vented them from becoming thor-
oughly integrated into the University
life and spirit and has marked them
as a separate isolated group.
"Home" life for the married vet-
eran is much more normal. His
"house" usually consists of a quarter
section of a long, dormitory-like
building badly in need of paint. In-
side, however, most of the homes are
neat and cozy. Their principal do-
mestic problem is the coal stove. The
stovemust serve for cooking as well
as heat, and in the warm summer
days with no shade trees in sight,
cooking has been an unpopular pas-
time. Hot water for baths must be
obtained in the same way-by hand
stoking the coal stove.
The Willow Village Council,
composed of both student-veterans
and factory workers also living in
the area, tried during the summer
to persuade the government to
make avtilable a greater supply of
electricity so that electrical heat-
ing and cooking units could be in-
stalled. So far, however, they have
met with little success.
The community spirit is evident
both among the single and married
students at Willow Village, although
the married men are naturally more
deeply concerned. Complaints about
high restaurant and grocery prices
have abounded and the Village's AVC
chapter has taken the lead in uniting
the community demands for co-
operative restaurants and grocery
stores.
"The Village is far from being
ideal and there are many things
which should be improved," said
one married veteran. "On the
other hand, most of us realize that
if it weren't for the Village we
would not be able to go to school,
so we can scarcely complain too
much."
In being able to admit the stream
of veterans who are returning here,
Michigan is far more fortunate than
at least 75 per cent of the schools in
the country, according to one Uni-
versity spokesman. Use of the tem-
porary housing project at Willow Vil-
lage this fall will enable the Univer-
sity to increase its enrollment to
18,000 students, or nearly 50 per
cent over any pre-war peak.
UNSIGHTLY HAIR GONE FOREVER
"New Short Wave Method"
Faster - Permanent - Safe
ELECTROLYSIS
GxOL D MIRROR BEAUTY SHOP
Fis Na tional Bldg Ph 6373 or 767

Birth of a University trailer village
may follow the vain search of
Thcmas S. Parsons, a freshman vet-
eran, for a place to park his trailer
on Michigan's campus.
Failing to interest University offi-
cials in his quest for an on-campus
parking place, Parsons has hit upon
the idea of grouping a number of
trailers near the Huron River near
Glen and Fuller streets as a tempor-
ary home for married veterans.
He described the idea as "a good
econ omical solution to the housing
shortage."
'arsons invited other veterans who
want more than "a pocketful of rent
receipts" to call him at his present
temporary quarters in the Prescott
Hall basement apartments at the
East Quadrangle.
Parsons said the University does
not discourage the idea of a trailer
village and that an official investiga-
tion of the possibility already is on
the way.

He estimated that the proposed
site, which already has washing fa-
cilities, could house from 600 to 800
married veterans. The cost of a trail-
er would amount to about $1,000, he
said.
At present, Parsons' trailer and his
wife are waiting in Niles, Michigan,
for some sort of a parking place to be
offered.
Also }lible
An American citizen who served in
the Canadian armed forces during
the war and who received gratuities
as a veteran under Canadian laws is
not barred from certain benefits un-
der the GI Bill of Rights. The veter-
an who received a cash bonus and a
"re-establishment credit" in an equal
amount from the Canadian govern-
ment is eligible for a VA loan guar-
antee as provided by United States
law.
- - - --_____ _ - -

HUTS FOR VETERANS-The Quonset huts (center) and house trailers (tap), housing veterans at Michigan
State College appear to be a small village in this airview. Sore of the huts (top row) are already completed
while others have only the framework constructed. "Veteranvilie" is located on both sides of Harrison Road
and just south of the state police barracks.
BIGGEST EXPANSION IN HISTORY:
Big TenrDesperate for ousgis
As Veterans Flock to Colleges

-- -_-

ii

i.

1 TSS GIESy
QUA LITY PRIN TING

By PAUL HARSHA
The monumental problem of hous-
ing thousands of veteran students has
forced Big Ten colleges into the big-
gest expansion of dormitory and
temporary residence facilities in' his-
tory.
Desperate for housing sites and
materials, other conference colleges
have set up veterans' villages in
abandoned Army camps as much as
35 miles from campus.
Huts Border Towns
Sprawling villages of quonset huts
and trailers border college towns.
On campus, fieldhouses are serving
as residence halls, and transplanted
Army barracks continue to serve as
home for veterans.
Doubling and tripling up is a gen-
eral rule in campus dormitories even
as construction of new dormitories is
rushed for the residence of new stu-
dents and new faculty members has-
tily appointed to meet the unprece-
dented demand for higher education.
Wsconsin Uses Trailers
The University of Wisconsin is
housing 1,866 student veterans at the
Badger Ordnance Works 35 miles
from the campus, one of the foremost
powder plants during the war.
Housing facilities in a hospital, li-
brary building and school buildings
at Truax Field six miles from campus
have been obtained for an additional
Foreign Study
Rules Clarif ied
Veterans who plan to study under
the GI Bill of Rights in Western Eu-
rope must present evidence 'with their
passport application that they have
been accepted for enrollment by the
institution they expect to attend,
according to R. B. Shipley, chief of
the State Department passport divi-
sion.
Shipley said in addition that vet-
erans must also present evidence
showing their study abroad has been
approved by the Veteran's Adminis-
tration.
Passports are granted freely to stu-
dents traveling within the Western
Hemisphere according to present
State Department policy.

1,660 students, and the University
has leased 191 trailers from the
FPHA which have been installed as
emergency homes for 400 veteran
students and their families on the
carmpus.
The University of Illinois has erect-
ed 275 prefabricated houses for mar-
ried veterans and a converted bar-
racks for single men, converted a
gym annex into a dormitory for men,
and encouraged more local residents
to rent rooms to students. tStudents
are occupying rooms in the home of
President A. C. Willard.)
Plan Stadium Use
Temporary housing units for 1,784
vetertns are set up on the Illinois
South Campus. Allocated by the
FPHA, these units house 1,049 single
and 735 married veterans and their
families.
Plans are completed at Illinois to
convert the west end of the stadium
as well as the University rink into
dormitories.
Indiana University will offer 500
per cent more living space on campus
than before the war. Their new hous-
ing prograr includes a permanent

men's dormitory group and dining
hall to accommodate 1,008 men, ad-
ditional temporary structures to
house more than 1,900 men and wom-
en, temporary apartments for 288
married students and junior faculty
members and temporary dormitory
units and apartments in Indianapolis
to house 185 student veterans in the
University's Indianapolis diivision.
UW Buildings Rise
The University of Wisconsin, with
16,000 students expected to enroll this
fall, is well under way with a $3,000,-
000 building program to help relieve
the housing shortage.
Included in the project is a 120-
unit apartment building, an addition
to the men's dormitories to house 200
single veteran students, and a 150
unit project .'or faculty members,
graduates,eassistants and research
associates.

ALL KINDS

0 FAST SERVICE

REASONAi B LE PRICES

IPROGRA MS e
100KMLETS
FAVORS

TICKETS

+ CARDS

® STATIONERY
e ANNOUNCEMENTS

aii'

308 NOrIr MAIN, DOWNTOWN
NEAR MAIN POST O CII -- P1 - ONE i2-1013

H ,

n _-UI"

r

. . . .

..

.

]1

i

1"

F RAT ER N iTY
SOROR ITY
CHAPTER
OF FICE RS
Are you all set for a big
year with Michigan's great-
est enrollment? Have you
an ample supply of frater-
nal "necessities" to carry

you through a
smoothly?

semester

_______________ __________________________________________________________

WOMEN'S

-SPORTS

-EDITORIAL

I

FOR REAL
AMERICAN BEAUTY
p' s ygu
6

i

9}

613 EAST LIBERTY ST. TELEPHONE 6380
Between the Michigan and State Theaters
GEORGE LUM, Proprietor
Aun Arbor's Finest Ilestuurunt
Completely Remodelled, Redecorated, Refurnished with
Entirely New Equipment from top to bottom.
DJELECTABLJE CHINESE FOOD
as well as
TASTY AMERICAN DISHES
including Steaks and Chops
SPECIAL NOONDAY
PLATE LUNCH EONS®
served from 11 A.M. CHOP SUEY
&a 1 D kA

Better check right nov
on your chapter's stock of
Pledge Pins
Recognition Pins
Stationery
Place Cards
Invitations
Christmas Cards

STAFFS
Get practical experience in news writing . . ,sports writing . .. editorial writing
...see how your College paper is put out . . . gain valuable experience in
newspaper work from A to Z .. .
The Michigan Daily is rated as one of the top college dailies in the nation
and The Daily has a spot for you on one of its writing staffs . . . No past
experience or training necessary . . . We will take care of that .. .
Come on out for one of the staffs and gain valuable experience . . . meet the
people behind the scenes of University life . . . learn the "inside" dope in the
athletic department... All this and more is awaiting you when you come out
to work for The Daily... Friendliness is the keynote and The Daily is a happy
place to work.
We'll Be Looking For You At The Tryout Meeting:

For gure lovcliness . ..for
youthful allure and real Ameri-
can beauty-Perma Lift. The
patentedhcushion inset at the
base o the bra cup assures firm,
gentle support-never becomes
laxsor limp through seasons of
washing and wear. No bone,
bulk, nor pull in Perma*Lift.
Bra and bandeau styles. Sizes 32
to 38 A, B, C cups.
75 -$9

I

Dance

Prog rams

Informal Notes

TODAY AT 4 P.M.

TOM and MEREDITH SUCKLING
L G BA LFOU R
1'E' tE S It J1 s

VETERANS and others with previous experience in

publcation work are particularly welcome.

U

I

ii

i

l

I

ai

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan