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October 18, 1946 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-18

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FAGI TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1946

PAGE TWO FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1946

38TH PARALLEL:
Koreans Bear Paradoxcal
New Government Patiently

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

By JAMES D WHITE
Associated Press Staff Writer
Americans would revolt in three
months if they were in Korean shoes,
says Kim Dong Sung, President of
the Korean Press Association, who
has just arrived here.
The "paradox" of a military gov-
ernment in time of peace is being
borne ,"quietly and patiently," he
says, because Koreans realize that
after 40 years of Japanese suppres-
sion they can regain their feet only
gradually.
Cut in Two
The 38th Parallel of Latitude, set
to divide the American and Russian
occupation zones and which has been
an airtight barrier from the begin-
ning, "cuts in two a country that is
homogenous in race culture and cus-
toms ingrained through a history of
four thousand years."
Make an iron curtain out of the
old Mason-Dixon line in this coun-
try, suggests Mr. Kim, and you have
an American equivalent of the 38th
Parallel in Korea.
Mr. Kim talks about many things,
but mostly about the 38th Parallel.
Of Lt. Gen. John R. Hodge, the
American commander, he has only
kind words, and expresses "our
Homecoming Dance
Tickets Are On Sale
Tickets for the Homecoming
Dance, the first "big" dance of the
year, will be on sale today and to-
morrow in a booth outside Rm. 1,
University Hall.
Regular sales will begin Monday
at booths in the League and Union
and on the Diagonal and will con-
tinue until the tickets are sold out.
Hours of the sales will be 9 a.m. to
noon every day and 1 to 4 p.m. every
day except Saturday.
Featuring Elliot Lawrence, his
piano and orchestra, the dance will
be- held in the intramural building
from 8:30 p.m. to midnight, Oct. 26.
SHE'S LOOKING AT YOU !
through
ALL-AMERICANS
the new and different glasses frames.
Made of heavy plastic to withstand
the hard knocks of an active life.
Also-Contact lenses fitted.
410 Wolverine Bldg. Tel. 6019

deep appreciation for . . , his sincere
and wise leadership."
Beyond Hodge
Mr. Kim says, however, that the
situation is beyond Hodge or anyone
else on the spot. The joint Russo-
American Commission set up to uni-
fy the country has not yet met for
months, and when it did the Soviet
members had to refer everything to
Moscow.
B.ack of this is Russo-American ri-
valry and suspicion, says Mr. Kim,
which is most dangerous in Korea
because this is the one spot in the
world where the two great powers
are in exclusive contact.
Campus Drive
Begins Today
Prof. Charles L. Jamison, of the
business administration school, has
announced that the organization for
the University participation in the
1947 Community Fund campaigr
which begins on campus today, is
now complete and functioning.
More than 2,000 alphabetized and
typewritten pledge cards which are
now in the hands of the campaign
workers, Prof. Jamison said, are ex-
pected to be returned promptly. He
added that' there has been a fine
spirit of cooperation on the part of
the University.
Details of the campaign's organiza-
tion are being handled by Mrs. Flor-
enca Brown and Mrs. Barbara Brown
Laing is the supervisor.
For the campus drive the campus
has been divided into six sections to
be headed by Director Clark Tibbitts,
of the Institute for Human Adjust-
ment: Prof. Edgar H. Gault, of the
business administration school; Mrs.
Dorothy Hargis, of the medical
school; Dr. Isabel Morgan, of the pub-
lic health school; Prof. Ivan H. Wal-
ton, of the engineering school; and
Mr. Harold S. Anderson, office su-
pervisor of plant service.
The large task of collecting the
University quota of $21,000 will be
undertaken by building chairmen,
appointed by the section chairmen,
who will be responsible for the col-
ections in their buildings.
Hold Your Bonds

Publication .n The Dally Official Bul-
letin is constructive notice to all ment-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent in typewritten
form to the office of the Assistant to the
President, Room 1021 Angell hall, by 3:30
p.m. on the day preceding publication
(11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
FRIDAY, OCTOBERt 18, 1946
VOL. LVII, No. 18
J.Noticesr
To All Chairmen of Departments:
Please call Extension 437 in the
Business Office and older the number
of faculty directories needed in your
department. Delivery will be made
by campus mail when directories are
available, presumably about Oct. 23.
Staff members may have a copy of
the directory for use at home by ap-
plying at the Information Desk in the
Business Office, Roonit 1, University
Hall.
Herbert G. Watkins,
Secretary
The University Golf Course will be
closed after Sunday, Oct. 20. Any
person having equipment there please
call for it by that time.
Board in Control
of Athletics
Assembly of the School of FOrestry
and Conservation today at 10:00 a.m.
in the Rackham Amphithea-
ter, at which representatives of the
furniture industry will speak. All
students in the School except those
with non-forestry conflicts are ex-
pected to attend. There will be an op-
portunity for students to meet and
talk with members of the industry in
the E. Conference Room of the Rack-
ham Bldg. Others interested are cor-

dially invited to attend both the as-
sembly and the conference.
Transfer Students: Students ad-
mitted with advanced standing will
be taken through the General Library
today. Tours will start in Rm.
110, General Library (which is
on the first floor near the West en-
trance) on the hour, beginning at 1:00
p.m. and continuing through 4:00
p.m.
Senior Aeronautical Engineers
graduating in February and June of
1947 should report to the Lobby office
of Eng. Bldg., as soon as possible to
complete their personnel blanks.
School of Music Students expecting
degrees at the end of the current se-
mester should fill out diploma appli-
cations immediately, if they have not
already done so. Secure applications
from School of Music office or Regis-
trar's office.
College of Literature, Science and
the Arts, Schools of Education, Music,
and Public Health: Students who ex-
pect to receive degrees at the end of
the Fall Semester from the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts,
School of Education, Music, or Public
Health must file a diploma applica-
tion in Room 4, University Hall, by
Nov. 1 if they have not already done
so.
A volleyball league is being formed
for faculty members, research assist-
ants, and teaching fellows. Teams
may be entered by departments or
formed by members of different de-
(Continued on Page 3)

4

ARTIST'S CONCEPTION OF NUERNBERG EXECUTION SCENE - This drawing by Associated Press
Staff Artist John Carlton was based on eyewitness de scriptions of the scene at one of the gallows in the
gymnasium of Nuernberg prison during hangings of ten high Nazis.

Scientists To Hear
Stumpf at Meeting
Dr. Paul K. Stumpf, instructor in
the epidemiology department in the
School of Public Health, will be the
speaker for the Association of Uni-
versity of Michigan Scientists at 8
p.m. Wednesday in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Dr. Stumpf came to the Universi-
ty this year from Columbia Uni-
versity where he was very active with
the New York Association of Sci-
entists. Speaking for the Michigan
scientists' first meeting of the year,
Dr. Stumpf will outline his opinion
on what should be the activities and
goals of groups interested in science.

Watch That Impacted Tooth

Future source of heart, lung, kid-
ney or eye infection may be that im-
pacted tooth, Prof. Reed 0. Ding-
man of the dentistry school said yes-
terday in a radio address over "WJR.
Prof. Dingman defined the im-
pacted tooth as any tooth which be-
cause of lack of room has been pre-
vented from taking its normal posi-
tion in the mouth. He explained that
serious trouble can result when the
blood stream carries harmful mate-
rial to other parts of the body from
the infected impacted tooth.
Pains from impacted teeth have
radiated to the neck, arms, dia-

phragm, and the pericardium, a sac
surrounding the heart, Professor
Dingman stated. He pointed out that
some patients suffering from men-
tal derangements have recovered fol-
lowing the extraction of impacted
teeth.
The best way to discover impacted
teeth is the X-ray, he indicated, and
these teeth should be removed as a
precautionary measure by the rela-
tively painless methods.
Programs are rebroadcast over
radio station WKAR at East Lansing
each week.

h. A

MwICHIGAN

Now Showing

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

LOST AND FOUND

Today and Saturday.
"JESSE JAMES"
with
Tyrone Power - Nancy Kelly
-- and -
"IN FAST COMPANY"
with Leo Gorcey and
The Bowery Boys

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LOST: Black and gold Parker "51" be-
tween Rackham Building and League
Coke Bar. Reward. Call Room 200, Helen
Newberry, 2-2591. )85
LOST: Black Roadmaster bicycle with
white trim, white-sidewall tires, wire
basket, light, speedometer, horn, lock
and cable.LHighland Park license 1764.
Call Tom Lough, 2-6173. )86
LOST: Maroon and gold Eversharp C.A.
pen, Monday. Please call Jo.n Levy, 2-
1046. Reward. )87
LOST: Silver link bracelet by W.A.B. Sat-
urday. Reward: Call Joan Broadbridge,
2-4514. )81
FOUR-SKIN MINK SCARF, lost Saturday
at E. University entrance to East Quad.
Sue Davis, 3718. )82
LOST: Black Shaeffer Triumph fountain
pen. Initials F.M.A. on gold cap. Please
call Muriel Aaron, 2-2591. )50
LOST: Small black change purse. Con-
siderable amount money enclosed. Re-
turn to Irene Straub, 725 Church St.
Reward. )10
BUSINESS SERVICES
BOOKKEEPING AID for Fraternities, Sor-
orities, other institutions. Nominal mon-
thly charge. Telephone Charles Koethen,
2-4925 between 7 and 9 A.M. )1
WANTED: DictatIon, typing and dicta-
phone transcription to do in my home.
Mail Box 56. )38
ELECTROLUX VACUUM CLEANERS
SALES * JOHN JADWIN * SERVICE
855 Tappan Ave. Phone 2-7412 or 2-2683
)49
DAY NURSERY
DAY NURSERY: Opening in Ypsilanti by
a veteran, for veteran's use. Hours to be
covered: 7:30 A.M to 6:00 P.M., 6 days a
week. Registered nurse in charge. Con-
tact H. M. Stitt, 526 W. Michigan, Ypsi.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
Weekdays 30c to 5 P.M.

FOR SALE
A-1 TYPEWRITER for sale. Latest L. C.
Smith 12-inch carriage, elite type, per-
fect condition. Phone 6466 after 6 p.m.
)89
NEW 6x30 Hensoldt Binoculars with case.
German made, excellent for football
games. George Hoyt, 206 Tyler House,
East Quadrangle, Ph. 2-4591. )15
SPINET PIANOS - Baldwin, Story and
Clark. Immediate delivery. Ypsilanti
Piano Co., 402 E. Michigan Ave., Ph.
Ypsi 878. ) 73
FOR SALE: Most pretentious . . . 2-fam-
ily in Ann Arbor. Beautiful living rooms
with unusual fireplaces, 4 and 5 bed-
rooms each, tile baths, oil burner, ex-
clusive design. Call 7805, E. A. Lechner.
)90
CHRONOGRAPH Wrist Watch with sweep-
second hand and 45-minute stops. 19
jewels. 18 carat gold case. Perfect con-
dition; worn six weeks. Ralph Smith,
200 Greene House, E. Quad, 2-4591. )88
ALBERTA BEAVER coat and muff. Like
new. Medium size. Cost $1500.00, will sac-
rifice. Also real leather facial chair.
Excellent condition. Dial 4838, Evenings
7-9. )78
NEW "POWERBIKE," fully equipped -
lights, horn, basket, wide saddle, new
tires.'Reasonable price. Phone 3759. )76
STUDENTS: solve your transportation
problems; ride an English lightweight.
3-speed gear, 2 caliper brakes, pump oil
bath chain guard. $79.50. CONTINENT-
AL SPORTS SHOP, 6453 Michigan Ave.,
Detroit, LA-7237, 24253 Woodward Ave,
Ferndale, Lincoln 1-2650. )23
HELP WANTED
THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL has open-
ings for men and women: Orderlies,
Porters, Nurses Aides, Serving Room
Helpers. Cafeteria available to employees.
Personnel office, first floor. )12

WANTED
WANTED: 1 ticket Horowitz concert, 1 for
Lehman concert. Jack Smith, 204 Mich-
igan House, 2-4401. )91
VET HAS URGENT NEED for "Sources of
English Constitutional History" by C.
Stephenson and F. G. Marcham. Call
William Burke if you desire to rent or
sell. Telephone 6293. )80
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A better
price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. )14
MISCELLANEOUS
TYPEWRITERS, office machines cleaned,
repaired. Work guaranteed. Three-day
service. Calculators sold and rented.
Pick-up and delivery. Office Equipment
Service Co., 111 S. 4th Ave., 2-1213. )26
EAT Lunch at Memorial Christian Church,
Hill at Tappan. )71
THE CAMPUS JAZZ GROUP still has three
open dates for after-the-game parties.
References furnished. Call Tom McNall,
2-4401.)3
MIDWAY Bicycle shop, 322 E. Liberty. We
have rebuilt used bikes for sale. Your
bike can be expertly repaired also. )56
TAILORI-NG and SEWING
CUSTOM MADE CLOTHES-Formals-Re-
modeling-Alterations. "Bring your sew-
ing problems to us." Hildegarde Shop,
116 E. Huron, 24669. )45
SEWING: Alterations and repairs on wo-
men's and girls' garments. Let me keep
your wardrobe in good repair. Miss Liv-
ingston, 315 S. Division, 2nd floor front.
)17
RED COACH INN
now opens seven days a week.
A special businessman's lunch,
from 70c on up, is being served
between 11:30 and 1:30.

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F LL
MICHIGAN vs. NORTHWESTERN
PLAY-BY-PLAY BROADCAST
BY BOB UFER
SATURDAY-1:50 P.M.
Listen to
Bob Ufer's Sports Review
Daily 12:30 P.M.
"HERE COMES HARMON"
Saturday- 1:35 P.M.
TOM HARMON brings you his forecast about
games throughout the country and interviews

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TI/IS!

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Many other cold-weather coats in
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K8

WITH
Donna REED*Tom DRAKE

1111

I

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