100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 24, 1946 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESLtAX, SEPTE 4'C 1 . 24, 1946

THE MICHIGAN IDAILY

"A icE EI E 'EleT

FOR FUTURE JOURNALISTS:

=-=

I
r
L

VOLUME I.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1890.

NUMBER 1.

-ROEHIMW
-s o iN r -
MAKERS Oy
FR A T EHNITY
271 Woodward Avernue, 'Grard Crcus
Park,
"DETRQtIT,. - M~thI-.

OUR RUGBY TEAM.
THE NEUCLEUS OF IT PRACTIC.-
ING DAILY ON THE CAMPUS
The Cainpus has taken on a
home like look this p>ast week. I
Ever aftirno ionhas ysn a ic f

before, and there wil tbe a game
at Buffalo this year that will be
imiarked by sandy playing. and a
much closer score than Cornell
will look for. To begin with
"Systematic Work" is to be the
foundation of the Rugby eleven
this year. At 4 P. M., every day,

W ri ght, Kay &Co
Frr' vn6 B rc mlmpo'ters of G~r",
and Art Gcoos, , evelers ard Op-
tic:ans Manufactarers of the
F.nest Society Badjes r ade in the
country Samples sent upon pro-
per refereqces,
140 WOO)W ARD AVE.,

Daily Tr
The first tryout meeting of the se-
mester for The Daily editorial, sports
and women's staff will be held at 4
p.m. today in the Student Publica-
tions Building.
Eligible for work on The Daily are
second semester freshmen, sopho-
mores, juniors and first semester sen-,
iors who meet the scholastic require-,
ments for extra-curricular activities
set by the Commititee on Student Af-
fairs.
The committee's general require-
ments are a 2.5 average for second
semesterfreshmen andga 2.0 average
for upperclassmen.
The first tryout meeting for The
Daily business staff will be held at 4
p.m. Thursday.
Previous experience is not required
for work on The Daily, since all try-
outs come under the staff training
program. Tryouts who have had ex-
perience on daily newspapers will
not be required to complete the train-
ing program but will be promoted to
higher staffs when abilities have
been demonstrated. .
Feud Resulted
In First Daily'
The first copy of the first Michigan
Daily off the press is now part of
the University Historical Collections.
Half advertisements, the first
Daily, called the "U of M Daily,"
originated in the strife between fra-

rout Meeting Today

-DAY
SERVICE

Now entering its 57tH year of con-
tinuous publication, The Daily offe'rs
opportunities for beginning a career
in journalism and service to the Uni-
versity.
Members of the editorial, sports
and women's staffs cover local events,
edit news from the wires of the As-
sociated Press, write editorials and
assist in publishing the paper.
After one semester on the tryout

staff, tryouts are advanced to the
sophomore staff, and from this group
night editors are chosen at the end of
the year. The night editors in turn
form the group from which the sen-
ior editors are later selected.
Prospective tryouts who are unable
to attend today's meeting are urged
to contact Ann Kutz, associate edi-
tor, at the earliest possible date.

our canvas backed Rugby players e ry mnan who wants to play on
tossing the ball back and forth, or the teams must show up on the
trying to kick goals. It has been !ampus. At 4:15 the players on
cold and raw, but the spectators the ground will be placed on the
have had many a langh as the lines of the two teams-for it is
b MalIey's intention to play two
boys would form an invincible \
_ -- - _ _ - - _ _ ,teamns everv day--and .the lav

Eietroit,

- - M'ch an .

FACULTY ANNOUNCEMENTS.
GENERAL BIOLoor.-The under-
signed will be in the Botanical
Laboratory onWednesday between
10:30 and 12:30 a. m., to consult
with students about courses in
Biology, Botany and Morphology.
Labratory work in Biology begins
Thursday at 9:30, in room 25.
. M. SPAULDIN.
. . EIGIAD.
LATJ.-Course 1. Section V.
Livy, will report to Prof. Rolfe,
It will be limited to students who
have shown exceptional proficien-
cv. It is expected that this sec-
tion will cover more ground than
the other sections.
Course 3. Section 1 wr xii be
given by Mr. Clement.
IIS YvOIr. -Students wishing to
take the courses in Bacteriology
will find .Mr. Novy in IIygiene
Laboratory every afternoon this
week. An optional course in
Water Analysis will be given this
semester. MA. No r.
ENGINEERI N'.) STUI)ENTs. -- A
course In Eoundryv Work will be
given the first semester.
All engineering students wish-
ing to take work in the Mechanical
Laboratory must see me Wed nea-
day or Thursday, at 11 a. m., at
my office. PaOF. TAYLOR,
FIRST ISSUE-The first issue of
The Michigan Daily, known in
those days as the U. of M. Daily,
appeared Sept. 29, 1890. Like its
successors, the first issue of that
year featured the gridiron sport.
U' Rifle Club
Planis Matches
Campus marksmen will be firing
for the University year.
George Meyer, president of the
newly organized University of Michi-
gan Rifle Club, said yesterday that
the club has been accepted for inter-
collegiate matches under the auspices
of the National Rifle Association. The
club will utilize the ROTC rifle
range.
Only undergraduate members of
the club will be eligible to represent
the University in intercollegiate
matches but graduate students and
faculty members are being accepted
as associate members, Meyer said.
Approved in June by the Commit-
tee on Student Affairs, the new club
now has 22 members. The member-
ship will be limited to 40 because of
limited facilities.
Meyer urged all interested persons
on campus to contact him at Wenley
House, 2-4401.
Animals for Greece
The Greek War Relief Association
shipped 10,797 animals to Greece in
it; campaign to help that prostrate
country's economic recovery from
World War II.
COTTAGE
INN

and split the wind with it, but if
they have had nothing but the
wind to buck against, they have
at least been learning to stand
shoulder to shoulder. And they
are doing good work, these few
who are back getting in condition
by tossing the ball, tackling,
breaking the line, trying the V
or the gridiron, and learning the
twist that gave Ames of Prince-
ton his celebrated nick-name of
"Snake Ames."
The boys are working under
Malley, who has brot ght back a
trunk full of new tri/cks and has
already began to teach his men a
few of them. Abbott, Trainer,
Iatch, Deont, Rathbone, Dy-
gertMcAllaster, Stone,and Chad-
bourne take to thenm as naturally as
any canvas-back does to water.
Of course the boys are all 'soft,"
and short winal d as yet, but if
they follow the liner laid down by
Captain Malley it will be soiled
meat and sand that Cornell runs
up against this year.
It does oneq heart good to hear
Captain Malley talk. If he does
one half the;iings he wants to do,
he will do double of anything
that has ever been thought of here

ers will play in these positionsthe
remainder of the day, the late
corners taking any positions that
may be left (?) when they get
there. At 5:15 the teams will go
to a bath-room to be placed prob-
ably in the basement of the Medi-
cal building. Here a douse and a
rub and then to Prettyman's,
where they will rest and discuss
the plays of the afternoon while a
supper is being prepared for them
at a training table .that Prettyman
is to run for them. This will be
run in the, same way that the
Eastern training tables are.
"Those who work shall play."
This comes pretty near being an
irish Bull, but Mallev says that
"It goes," and adds '-I want at
least fourteen new mcni this year,
and I want the boys to come out
and try for these positions. And
when it comes to selecting the
neni who will go East this year,
it is going to be.a simple question
of the twenty-two men who can
and have been playing the best
Rugby day by day. Twenty-two
mnen will go East. The Harvard,
Yale and Princeton players are all
hatd at work now, every ma of
them, and it is flee that our boys
were willing to do the taie if

they ever hope to down the Eastern
team. And the fact is they've
got to work if they play this
dear."
Malley is very, very right, and
every man who plays Rugby ought
to come ont, put his foot in the
ball, and try for a position on the.
team. If you fail for the Varsity
eleven there will still be the second
eleven, all of whom will take the
Eastern trip. Twenty.two men
will go East.
In the way of material not al-
ready noticed Van Deventer, the
Shermans, Haynes, VanInwagen,
Glidder, Sunderland, Duffv, and
Prettyman are expected to be her
this year. For new material,
Jewett, who played a rattling
game as half-back for the High
School eleven last year, entet '94
lit. Ninety-four also gets Chad-
bourne, who played center on the
1ih illip's Exeter Academy eleven
last year, the eleven that made
such a good showing against such
college teams as Dartmouth, Am-
herst, and the Tech. Over in the
law school they have Stone, a
graduate of Swarthmore, '89, who
played full-back a portion of the
time while there. The most that
can be said of these new men now is
that they bid fair with practice to
be able to get onto one of the two
teams.

ternity men and independents, ac-
cording to Judge Harry D. Jewell,
'91L, who donated the debut number,
along with the first four volumes, to
the University when he was in Ann
Arbor for the Victory Reunion.
All of the publications appearing
on campus in the Eighties were either
weeklies or monthlies, Judge Jewell
explained, and the independents felt
that they were not sufficiently repre-
sented in these organizations.
As a result, the independents or-
ganized in the spring of 1890 and
decided to publish a campus news-
paper. On Sept. 29, 1890, the first
number of the "U of M Daily" ap-
peared; and the University thereby
became the first college west of Cor-
nell to publish a daily paper, Judge
Jewell pointed out.
The first issue printed the follow-
ing editorial:
"'Is the daily paper a go?' This
oft-repeated question is answered
once for all by our appearance to-
day. Yes, the Daily is a go. It is here
to stay , .for we intend to make
the Daily so- bright and newsy, so
wide-awake and progressive, and
withal so impartial that no student
can get along without it."

on
DRY CLEANING
IF BROUGHT INS TO EITHER OF OUR STORES ON
MONDAYS, TUESDAYS OR WEDNESDAYS.
-e 4

Brothe'rs

4

214

STORES AT

SO. STATE ST.

- 1 15 SO. UIVERSITY

I 'I

r-
. .
.,, ;: ,
.cam
.,
:- -c...
.

i - - - il

CAMPUS
FEAVOIES

F'' ; o
F.
. : i::::;:
. , }'til ry , f.
j 'mow
f '

/.

\
i

Everything for the college ward-
robe is available at June Grey's.
From hand made argyles to col-
orful babushkas . . . . . From
CHESTERFIELD sweaters to
New York-styled coats.. .From
slacks to hats and date dresses.
LANZ
M ADE MOISE LLE SWISS

II
%ZFC¢" . .
Y fin
_ f:l
:, f
..... 9 tit
.:
'
.. .. _ Mw<
.
+h,,
f ^ ""
}
5
f.
4.{/
'
l+
.} i
%.;'#
3i ''3
!f
..
3

EVENING WRAPS
16.95. ... 37.50

FORMAL BLOUSES
0.95 and up

COATS and SUITS
24.00 and up
SWEATERS
Slipover, Cardigan

FROCKS
9.95 and up
SKIRTS
3.98 and up

PETTI

ANKKLETS . . .
Wool or Cotton

LINGERIE.. .
Gowns, Slips, Pajamnas,
Panties

BLOUSES .. .
Dress or Sport

I A, I

1111

II

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan