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October 13, 1946 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-13

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1946

TTHE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

-,

A FACULTY FOR KNOWING:
Angell's Sculpture Decorates Campus

I

i

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second in
a series of weekly articles on faculty
personalities.
Pick your favorite statue or work of
sculpture on campus and the chances
are that it's been done by Carleton
Angell, University artist.
Ranging from the lions in front of
the museum down to the andirons in
President Ruthven's study, close to
one hundred pieces of sculpture have
been done by Angell since he first
joined the faculty in 1923.
Angell started.off modestly enough
doing the plaque on the scabbard and
blade rock at the foot of the main
flagpole in front of the library.
When the museum was built in 1927
he moved into his present quarters
on the fourth floor, but not before he
had done the frieze work on the out-
side of the building and carved his
now legendary lions at the front door.
An unprofessorial looking man
with a sunny smile, Angell can usu-
ally be found in his office in shirt-
sleeves and suspenders working on a
plasticine or wet clay model.
Surrounding him high and low on
every available bit of shelf space are
various prominent personalities, cre-
ations of his own that he is still
working on or has already completed.
Magazine Gives
Market Outlet
Perspectives, University literary
magazine, is planning to provide a.
channel to publishers and a commer-
cial market for students of the Uni-
versity' whose work appears in the
magazine.
Although primarily intended for
campus reading, Perspectives will be
sent to several publishing houses each
month, in order that student writers
may have an outlet to the commercial
field.
Last year's spring publication of
Perspective revived the magazine
after a wartime shutdown . Perspec-
tives will apear each month as a sup-
plement to The Michigan Daily.
Book Exchange
To Mail Checks
Student who failed to pick up their
checks or unsold textbooks at the
Student Book Exchange will be
mailed checks for the books sold along
with a statement of their books re-
maining in the Exchange, the Stu-
dent Legislature announced yester-
day.
Unsold books will remain in the
exchange and the owners receipts
will be honored during the spring
sales. 6

4y
CARLETON W. ANGELL
His major interest, from an artis-
tic standpoint, is animals.
One of his many jobs is construct-

together with the advice and counsel
of the paleontology department.
The technique is a lot different
than the one used in doing simple
'latter day houseapets and zoo resi-
dents. Usually all that Angell will
have to work with will be the bones of
the animal assembled into skeleton by
the paleontologists. This together
with scientific historical information
concerning the animal will be pre-
sented to Angell and from there on in
it's all his.
Bcrn in Belding, Michigan, Angell
received his formal education at the
Art Institute in Chicago and worked
in New York for some time before
joining the faculty in 1923. 1
Wets on Parade ..*
This is the story of the lady who
lost her shoes.
Returning shuffle-foot through the
stadium parking lot after the game,
a female spectator left first one slip-
per and then the other in a small
water hazard created by the rain.
Cold water seeping through the
lady's nylons induced sufficient so-
briety for her to retrieve her shoes
and hold on to her male companion
at the same time.
The spectacle caused a flurry of

Willow
Highlights
Elementary courses in Spanish and
psychology will be offered by
the University Extension Service in
classes to be held in Willow Run Vil-
lage, beginning this week.
First meeting of the class in Span-
ish will be held at. 8 p.m. Tuesday in
the West Court Community Building,
with Donald MacQueen as instruc-
tor. Herbert Meyer will conduct the
psychology class, which will have its
first meeting at 8 p.m. Thursday in
West Court. Each course offers two
hours credit.
* *
Wednesday Lectures ..**
The University will sponsor a ser-
ies of Wednesday night lectures at
West Court Community Building at
Willow Village, Miss Anna R. Harris,
Social Director at West Court an-
nounced yesterday.
Oct. 16, Dean Hayward Keniston of
the College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts will speak on "What is hap-
pening in Argentina?"
Oct. 23, Prof. Harley H. Bartlett of
the botany department will speak on
"Jungle Episodes."
Oct. 30, Prof. Slosson of the His-
tory department will speak on "Inter-
national issues in the current elec-
tion."
Nov. 6, Prof. Glenn D. McGeoch of
the School of Music will speak on
"How To Listen to a Symphony."
Nov. 13, Prof. Wesley H. Maurer of
the journalism department will speak
on "Books People are Reading."
Nov. 20, Prof. Jean P. Slusser of the
architecture college will speak on
"How to Look at a Modern Painting."
Dec. 4, Prof. Lawrence Preuss of
the political science department will
speak on "Votes and Vetoes in the
United Nations."
'U' Quota $21,000
In Fund Campaign
Prof. Charles L. Jamison, of the
business administration school and
director of the University's partici-
pation in the Community Fund cam-
paign, has announced that the Uni-
versity's quota is $21,000.
The quota includes contributions
from students, faculty, and the Uni-
dersity administration. Prof. Jamison
said that $2,000 had been suggested as
the student quota.

LOST AND FOUND.
LOST: Single string of pearls. Reward.
Call Gloria, 2-2591. )73
LOST: Black Shaeffer pen, plunger-type,
on campus or Ingalls. Call Andee Sugar,
2-2591. )74
LOST: Leather jacket (Type A-2). Name
on inside: William E. McCoppin. Con-
tact at 536 Thompson St. Phone 2-1297.
Reward. )37
LOST: Rhinestone pin, Saturday, Oct. 5,
between Kroger store and Stadium. Re-
ward. Return to Michigan Daily Box 13.
)68
LOST: Dark prescription lens sunglasses,
horn rimmed, in the vicinity of State
Street, on Saturday. Call Mary Lou
Waldner at Ypsi 9265. Reverse charges.
)42
LOST: Blue suitcase initialed J.H.L. Taken
by cab from station Sept. 16, destination
West Quadrangle. Art Lloyd, 2-4401. )17
LOST: Grey Parken Pen in Union cafe-
teria. Contact Ivan Barris, 319 Thomp-
son. 26145. Reward )5
LOST: Gold raincoat left in room 3116
Natural Science on Friday morning.
Finder please phone Ruth Gerstner -
2-6112 )6
LOST: Friday night between Ferry Field
and Harris Hall. Engraved Barbara Mc-
Crady. Reward. Call 23672 )41
BUSINESS SERVICES
WANTED: Dictation, typing and dicta-
phone transcription to do in my home.
Mail Box 56. )38
Wallace Will Stump State
For Democratic Ticket
By The Associated Press
Henry A. Wallace, former vice
president and until recently com-
merce secretary, steals the political
spotlight in Michigan this week.
He is scheduled to stump the state
for the Democratic ticket Friday, Sat-
urday and Sunday, with his route
leading from Muskegon to Detroit.
Wallace, an outspoken critic of
current American foreign policy, is
expected to fire a verbal salvo at Re-
publican Arthur H. Vandenberg, seek-
ing re-election as U. S. senator Nov.
5.
Vandenberg, as adviser to Secre-
tary of State Byrnes, must accept re-
sponsibility for foreign policy and is
the logical Michigan target for Wal-
lace.

ELECTROLUX VACUUM CLEANERS
SALES * JOHN JADWIN * SERVICE
855 Tappan Ave. Phone 2-7412 )41
WANTED
MEN STUDENTS' laundry done reason-
ably.. 3-day service. Phone 2-6760. )77
MUSICIAN: Tenor Sax Man wanted im-
mediately. Call 7590. )70
WILL PAY top price for book "Recent Ex-
periments in Psychology" by Crafts. Call
4017. ) 72
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A better
price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. )14
SAX AND TRUMPET players for small
jobbing dance bands. Call 26364 )9
FOR SALE
NEW "POWERBIKE," fully equipped -
lights, horn, basket, wide saddle, new
tires. Reasonable price. Phone 3759. )76
FOR SALE:s ike new OLDS trombone.
Best Olds sold. Call 3321-W, Ypsi. )43
MAN'S BICYCLE, basket, padlock, good
condition, $25.00. 1424 Washington
Heights, Apt. 2, phone 8791. )69
FOR SALE: New Log-Log Duplex Decitrig
slide rule, $14. Marie Wing, 6922. )40
STUDENTS: solve your transportation
problems; ride an English lightweight.
3-speed gear, 2 caliper brakes, pump oil
bath chain guard. $79.50. CONTINENT-
AL SPORTS SHOP, 6453 Michigan Ave.,
Detroit, LA-7237, 24253 Woodward Aye,
Ferndale, Lincoln 1-2650. )23
HELP WANTED
DISH WASHERS wanted by fraternity to
work for board. Contact house manager.
Telephone 2-6500, Phi Sigma Kappa, 1043
Baldwin. ) 67
HELP WANTED: Soda fountain clerks-
Sunday, 4-12. $1 per hour. Miller Dairy
Store, 1219 So. University. )25
WANTED: Woman for washing dishes and
kitchen work. Also waitresses full or
part time. Hours: 4:30 to 12 midnight.
Phone 1852 Ypsilanti. )32
WANTED: Full and part time experienced
salesladies. Apply at Elizabeth Dillon
Shop. ) 33
WE HAVE OPENINGS FOR five girls who
can work 'following hours. 4 p. m.-10:30
p .m.; 4:30 p. in.-11:00 p. m., 5:00 p. m.
11:30 p. m., 5:30-12 midnight. You get
paid for 8 hours while only working
6% hrs. plus extra pay for working; even-
ings. 2-15 minute relief during the ev-
ening and free cab service after 11 p. m.
Michigan Bell Telephone, 323 E. Wash.
)64

FOR RENT
EXCHANGE RENTAL opportunity-want-
ed: Detroit aprt, fiat, or house to rent.
Bait: Large 2-room sleeping study comn-
bination, Ann Arbor. Box 40, Michigan/
Daily. 31
HOLLYWOOD DOUBLE BED. Deluxe box
springs and mattress. Excellent condi-
tion, to avoid shipping East. Almost
half-price, $45. Phone Ypsilanti 3545. )71
ALBERTA BEAVER coat & muff. Like new.
Medium size. Cash $1,500.06. Dial 4838,
Monday eve, 7-9. Also real leather fa-
cial chair. Excellent condition. )78
MALE OR FEMALE FOUNTAIN HELP: 3
schedules available: 3-6 p.m., 6-10 p.m.,
3-10 p.m. If hours suit your require-
ments, apply in person to Withams
Drug Company, corner of S. U. and
Forest. )34
HELP WANTED: GI Willow Village wife,
competent to handle 2 children aged 2%,
and 11 yrs., for 2 or 3 weeks on or about
Nov. 17, when mother expects third
child. 8:30 to 5:00 daily except Sun-
day, $25 per week. See Mrs. Eberlein,
1305 Enfield Ct., between 2:30 and 3:30
p.m.)4
MISCELLANEOUS
TYPEWRITERS, office machines cleaned,
repaired. Work guaranteed. Three-day
service. Calculators sold and rented.
Pick-up and delivery. Office Equipment
Service Co., 111 S. 4th Ave., 2-1213. )26
THE CAMPUS JAZZ GROUP still has three
open dates for after-the-game parties.
References furnished. Call Tom McNall,
2-4401.)3
MIDWAY Bicycle, shop, 322 E. Liberty. We
have rebuilt used bikes for sale. Your
bike can be expertly repaired also. )36
ALPHA XI DELTA alumnae: New to Ann
Arbor alumnae chapter please contact
Mrs. Robert Gach, 98 Valhalla Drive.
Phone 2426 before first monthly meet-
ing which will be held at the Chapter
House, 825 Tappan Thursday, Oct. 17,
at 8 p. m. )11
TAILORING and SEWING
CUSTOM MADE CLOTHES-Formals--Re-
modeling-Alterations. "Bring your sew-
ing problems to us."' Hildegarde Shop,
116 E. Huron, 24669. )45
PERSONAL
MISS N. J.: We quite understand how you
feel. The Editors of Gargoyle.
PRINTING
IT COSTS YOU NOTHING to get my es-
timateon printing jobs - calling cards
to posters. Call Tom Walsh, 5989 )1

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

ing pre-historic animals. He does this laughs among nearby onlookers.
NO MORE WILDERNESS:
'The Iceman Cometh' Marks
O'Neill's Return to Broadway

By MARK BARRON
NEW YORK, Oct. 12--(iP)-Sailor-
playwright Eugene O'Neill is home to
stay with an imposing packet of plays
which could well be a lifetime pro-
duction for an average dramatist.
Returning for the first time since
1934 to the Gay White Way on which
he was born for the premiere of his
lengthy "The Ice Man Cometh," he
says that never again will he wander
far from his native New York.
"I'd like to build or buy a place on
Long Island," he said. "I've lived in
almost every section of the country
and I'm getting tired of pulling up
stakes and wandering off."
58 Years Old
The lean, sun-burned, greying dra-
matist, who celebrates his 58th birth-
day Oct. 16, spoke on "The Iceman
Cometh" with a touch of nostalgia.
"I knew quite a few of the people in
'The Iceman Cometh.' My favorite
haunts in those days (the time of the
play is 1912)"were along the down-
town westside waterfront. The boys
were rough and tough, but square."
mm=

"The Iceman Cometh," a drama of
a group of bums and tarts in a cheap
gin-mill on New York's west side, lifts
its first curtain at 5:30 p.m., with a
dinner intermission from 6:30 to 7:45,
and the final curtain at 11 p.m.
Length Not Considered
"The length of the play?" O'Neill
mused. "I've never even given it a
thought. I had no idea how long it
might be when I started to write. It
turned out to be an hour to hour
drama. That's that.
"I hope that everyone gets to din-
ner, though. I wouldn't care very
much for someone coming back to the
theater hungry enough to eat the
author."
O'Neill said that he completed "The
Iceman Cometh" in 1939, and an-
other play which also will be pro-
duced this season by the Theater
Guild, "A Moon for the Misbegotten,"
was completed the following year.
O'Neill, however, felt that the war
years were not a proper time to pro-
duce the plays and so held them until
now.,
Oft,,7

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