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May 25, 1947 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-05-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I UN~DAY, MAY 25, 1917

THE MICHIGAN AILY

______________________________ U U

SAE Dance
To Feature
Buddy Rich
Michigan Chapter To Start
Southern State Tradition
COf 'Black and White Ball'
Buddy Rich, one of the nation's
top drummers, will play for the
Sigma Alpha Epsilon spring for-
mal, "Black and White Ball,"
which will be held from 9 p.m to
midnight Thursday at the Washte-
naw Country Club.
"Black and White Ball" is so
named because all guests wear
black or white. The dance has long
been traditional with the Sigma
Alpha Epsilon chapters in South-
ern colleges, but Michigan's Iota.
Beta is the first of the chapters in
the Midwest to present it.
The presidents of all campus
fraternities have been invited to
the dance, as have parents and
friends of the fraternity mem-
bers.
Buddy Rich was recently heard
on campus at Norman Granz's
"Jazz at the Philharmonic" con-
cert in Hill Auditorium. Rich, fea-
tured for years with Tommy Dor-
sey, now has his own orchestra of
sixteen pieces, featuring Allen
Eager on tenor saxophone, Earl
Swope on trombone, and Tommy
Allison on trumpet.
Members of the band will be
entertained at dinner at the
chapter house, and will give a
jam session for SAE members
and their guests afterwards. The
house will be decorated in black
and white. Three buses have
been hired from the University
to carry guests to the country
club for the dance.
Robert Rogers, SAE social chair-
man, is in charge of the dance. He
has been assisted by Don Champ-
ney, Hap Eaton, Don Mather, and
Don Rohrer.
Weddings &
Engagements
Dr. and Mrs. J. Orton Goodsell
of Saginaw have announced the
engagement of their daughter,
Janice, to Mr. David Oeming, son
of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Oeming of
Saginaw. Miss Goodsell is a jun-
ior in the literary college and is
a member of Alpha Phi. Mr. Oem-
ing is a student in the College of
Architecture and Design and is
affiliated with Chi Phi. The wed-
ding will take place June 18 in
Saginaw.
* * *

N,

School of Public Health Offers
Specialized Training to Students

Honoraries Club To Qive
HoldElections Swim Meet

By AUDREY BUTTERY
Up on the hail acing Masher
Hall stands a new-looking build-
ing, a familiar sight to dorm resi-
dents and Arb-goers, which houses
the School of Public Health, one
of eight of its kind accredited in
the United States.
Programs of study offered to
students in the School of Public
Health, all of them professional
people before their entrance, are
many and varied but can be gen-
erally classified into categories:
the undergraduate program, open
to qualified registered nurses who
are seeking a Bachelor of Science
degree, and the graduate program,
open to physicians, teachers, engi-
neers, and other professionals who
pursue courses of study in public
health pertinent to their own
fields.
"There is a great need for
competent personnel in this
highly-specialized field," stated
Mrs. Mary White, recorder. "Our
school is never able to fill the
demand from agencies and com-
panies all over the United States
for people trained in public
health. Accordingly we must
maintain our rather high re-
quirements for entrance and
graduation in order to be cer-
tain of training students who
are capable and sincerely inter-
ested in this field as a lifetime
career."
Mrs. White explained that one
reason the demand for personnel
exceeds the supply is that 85% of
the students registered this year
are being sent to the School of
Public Health by government or
private agencies or by foreign
countries with the'stipulation that
they return to fill public health
positions with their respective
sponsors.
Over half the enrollment this
year consists of undergraduate
women, about 45 of whom served
as nurses in various services dur-
ing the war.
OUR SPECIALTY
3-HOUR
ODORLESS
DRY CLEANING
2-Day
Regular Service
\IC LEAHN RS
630 South Ashley N

The School of Public Health was
first organized here in 1941, when
the graduate and undergraduate
programs were removed from other
colleges and combined in this new
unit.
At first, the school was sup-
ported chiefly by grants from sev-
eral well-known educational foun-
dations, but is gradually being in-
corporated into the University
budget.
Working under one of these re-
search grants, Dr. Thomas Fran-
cis, Jr., developed the vaccine
with which 15,000 students, faculty
members, and University personnel
were inoculated here last fall for
the prevention of influenza.

Officers for 1947-48 have re-
cently been chosen by Wyvern and
Senior Society, women's honorary
groups.
Eugenia McCallum was electedl
president of Wyvern, all-campus
junior honor society, while Pat
Peter was chosen as secretary and
Harriet Mermelstein as treasurer.
Officers for Senior Society, hone
orary for senior independent co-
eds, include Jo German, president,
Naida Chernow, vice-president and
social chairman; Mary Ruth Levy,
secretary; and Ruthani Perry
FitzGerald, treasurer.
According to Miss German, Se-
nior Society's objective for next
year will be the furthering of co-
operation among all independent
' women on campus.

In IUnioni Pool
The Women's Physical Educa-
tion Club will sponsor a swimmingf
meet from 8 to 10 a.m. Thursday
in the Union Pool.
All physical education majors
and minors are eligible. Junior
majors are in charge of the pro-
gram Entrants will enter for in-
dividual events and class swim-
ming among the freshmen, sopho-
more and senior class,
Events are of six categories:
speed events include 25 yd. free-
style, 25 yd. back crawl, 25 yd.
breast stroke; 100 yd. freestyle;
75 yd. medley relay, back crawl,
breast stroke, freestyle;25 yd. nov-
elty race; form events, side stroke,

Union Will Hold
Bluebook Ball'
Imi+i' urc bluebooks vwill1be
given as programs to those at-
tending the Bluebook Ball, to be
held from 9 p.m. to midnight Sat-
urday in the Union Ballroom.
The next-to-last Union dance of
thr year will feature Frank Tinker
and'his orchestra. Decorations will
foll ;w a bluiebook themce, and a
secial intermission program has
been planned by the committee
breast stroke, elementary back;
diving, two compulsory dives, two
optional dives.
The central committee for the
meet includes Mary Lou Larmee,
Edith Feinberg, co-chairmen; Phil
Lloyd, regulations of entrants;
Elaine Kertschinski, program;
Lynn Rudd, officials; Naida Cher-
now, publicity.

Pick Cotton
In
BETMAR
Bonnets
for Summer
1Toms for your cool, little
suits and cotton dresses.
Betmar bonnets designed in
linen-like spuns and crisp
piques. Pick yours in our
College Hat Shop ... 2nd
floor.

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ARCHERY QUEEN-Irma Bartley of Escanaba, Mich., has been
chosen queen of the Hiawathaland Festival, to be held in Esca-
naba July 3 to 6. The festival will include sports events and a
historical spectacle.
WAA NOTICES

/.

Games scheduled for the h.st
week of the WAA softball tourna-
ment are as follows:
Monday: Semi-finals: Jordan V
vs. Alpha Phi II, Kappa Kappa
Gamma vs. Zone II team II at
5:10 p.m.; Chi Omega vs. Mosher
II at 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday: Finals: Delta Delta
Delta plays winner of Chi Omega
vs. Mosher II game, at 5:10 p.m.;
winner of Jordan V vs. Alpha Phi
II plays winner of Kappa Kappa
Gamma vs. Zone II team II game
at 7:00 p.m.
In case of rain Monday, Mon-
day's games will be played on
Tuesday and Tuesday's on Wed-
nesday. All these games will have
five innings, so teams should be
prepared for a longer 'time for
play.
* * *
Crop and Saddle

Oct. 18. The show will be open to
all students who know how to ride
and would like to enter.
Plans for next year include lec-
tures on horsemanship, mixed
rides with men's riding club, Boots
and Spurs, and supper rides. Dur-
ing the winter season members will
work on horsemanship and drills
in the indoor ring. Club activi-
ties will continue throughout the
school year.
Faculty Contest
The new WAA Board will meet
the Women's Physical Education
Faculty in a softball game at 5:10
p.m. tomorrow at Palmer Field.
A game similar to this was held
three years ago. Surprizes are in
store for both players and specta-
tors, according to Betty Eaton,
WAA president. All students are
invited to watch the game.

$nowy pique half-hat, 5.00

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McMULLEN'S
Two-Piece
Chambray
Charmer
McMullen's wonderful fabric.. .McMul-
len's talented styling make this prize
cotton find. Cool slate grey for the fly.
front blouse ... multicolor stripes on
white for the full-cut skirt that has so
many changeabout possibilities. Misses
size
19,95

/

7/11

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Mr. and Mars. V. Van Brocklin of Crop and Saddle, WAA Riding
Grand Rapids have announced the Club, is planning reorga'tization
engagement of their daughter, for the corning year, according to
Phyllis, to Mr. Earle Schumacher, Pat Peter, president.
Jr., son of Mr. Earle Schumacher An organizational meeting will
of Maplewood, N.J. Miss Van be held at 5 p.m. Thursda-y, Sept!
Brocklin is a member of Kappa 25 in the WAB. This meeting is
Alpha Theta and will graduate open to all coeds interested in try-
from the literary college in June. ing out for the club. Reorganiza-
Mr. Schumacher is a sophomore tion plans will begin with the try-
in the School of Medicine and is outs on Sept. 30, membership will
a member of Phi Chi. As an un- be increased to include about 30
dergraduate he was affiliated with members in two sections.
Phi Delta Theta. No date has The Horse Show, customarily
been set for the wedding. held in the spring, will be held
. ~
!f ® .this cushioned
- platform casual with
foot-pampering ways. . .
assuring you of
glove-smooth fit that
makes for sustained
comfort the whole
busy day thru! C
X95
1949
, Red a 9
Brow9
AU"1lo
19l

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DRESSES - BOTH STORES

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CRUISE a; {
.4
Bustle and peafs
to flap engagingly n
the Summer Wind!'
White, black, natural,
aqua, pink, maize {
Sizes 9-15.

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>:.: .>

Spun linen cloche, 5.00
Mademoiselle-featured
baby cap, 3.95

cL t

Miss PHYLLIS WOODBURY
Special RITZ Consultant
Will Be at Goodyear's
All Next Week.

The GARDEN and SNACK BAR
Will Be CLOSED MONDAY
... to make the changeover from certain temporary to permanent equip-
ment with the least inconvenience to our customers. OPEN AS USUAL
TUESDAY!

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Ti'ues'day . . . At
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the College Shop

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POSE FOR YOUR PORTRAIT IN Y p wdW1

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