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May 08, 1947 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-05-08

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..THURSDAY,.JAAY 6,1941

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wolverines

Run

Wild

Over

U

ofD

Linksmen, 35-1

20 Frats Seek
Track Crown
Ten Events Highlight
Annual Outdoor Meet
Thinclads from twenty fratern-
ities will spike the Ferry Field
cinlders today in the traditional
outdoor fraternity track and field
meet, slated to begin at 5 p.m.
if the weather permits.
Opening up the ten-event pro-
gram will be the preliminaries in
the high hurdles. The six best
times will qualify for the final
heat, which will be run off as the
third event following the mil;'
grind.
Next on the agenda will be the
low hurdlers' preliminary round
with the quickie 100-yard dash
sandwiched in between the quali-
fying and final race. The meet
will close after the speedsters are
put through the 440 and 880yard
paces.
Although the outdoor track title
has not been claimed by any fra-
ternity since the war program was
installed, some indication of fra-
ternity strength was given in the
indoor mile relay runs last win-
ter. The Beta Theta Pil quartet
whipped away with that crown,
followed by Sigma Chi, Chi Phi,
and Phi Gamma Delta.
If the weather remains cold, the
meet will be postponed until next
Tuesday.

Michigan'Turnson Heat'
To Swamp Titan Golfers
Barclay, Schalon Battle Weather To Pace
Mnaize and Blue to Fifth Straight Triumph

By MURRAY GRANT
With the weather so frigid that
the golfers could hardly grasp
their clubs, the Michigan golf
team slaughtered a poor Univer-
sity of Detroit golf squad by a
35-1 count yesterday on a snow
swept University Course.
Using eight men teamed in four
foursomes, Coach Bert Katzen-
meyer's crew battled the unsea-
sonable weather to easily notch
their fifth consecutive win and
their ninth victory against three
losses for the season.
Barclay, Schalon Win
Captain Dave Barclay and big
Ed Schalon teamed up in the
number one twosome and turned
in the best golf of the afternoon
as they defeated the Titans top
linksters, John Povlitz and Al Kie-
fer. Barclay lost 12 of the point
the Wolverines managed to give
up when he halfed the back nine
with Povlitz.
Detroit took the other '/2 point
in the number two match when
Paul O'Hara and Don Paget
matched identical strokes on the
front nine to half their match at
that point. O Hara, however,
went on to take the lead on the
back nine and narrowly squeaked
by with a 1 up triumph for 2 /2
points.
O'Hara teamed with Bill Court-
right in the number two slot to
dispose of Paget and Dick Buech-
ler and add 81/2 more markers
to the growing Wolverine total.
Jenswold, DeVries Triumph
Johnny Jenswold and Garry De-
A

Vries, playing in the third four-
some, ended their match on the
13th hole as they slaughtered
their Titan foes. Jenswold took
Paul Oleson 7 and 5 while De-
Vries made hash of Don Visscher
to the tune of an 8 and 7 shellack-
ing.
In the final foursome Rog Kess-
ler and Jack Vezina added 9 more
points to bring the total to 35 as
they trounced Pete Allen and Bob
DeVine, 5 and 3 and 6 arid 5, re-
spectively. Vezina narrowly miss-
ed sharing medalist honors with
Schalon when he chippedebeauti-
fully onto the 18th green and
then rimmed the cup with his
putt to give him a card of one
more than Schalon.
Varsity-Jayvee Match
Tomorrow ten varsity men will
match strokes with a jayvee team
in a 18 hole match. Leading the
field will be Barclay who is paired
against Kenny Berke. Berke in
qualifying for the jayvee squad
turned in two sizzling rounds of
71, which are the best scores card-
ed this season. Vezina is the only
other members of the team to
have cracked par thus far as he
turned in a 71 on a practice round
Tuesday.
On Saturday the Wolverines
play host to a mediocre Illinois
team that has had a dismal sea-
son. Then the team goes on a
three match jaunt, meeting Mich-
igan State, Purdue and Detroit in
away matches next week.
Major Lea gue
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

S POt SCRnAPiooK
By JACK MARTIN, Daily Sports Editor
THE HERALDED post-war boom in sports has been in progress for
over a year now, and the Midwest has been the scene of some of
its greatest surgings. The customer competition for seats at all man-
ner of athletic frays from football to fencing has been almost as ter-
rific as the players' battles for berths on the squads themselves.
The boom isn't restricted to the old line favorites, however.
New sports are moving into the picture, and right here in our own
backyard a sport has been gaining in collegiate popularity for the
past few years by leaps and bounds. It's an importation from the
East-sailing. Michigan has been the leader in the move to make
sailing a recognized college sport throughout the Midwest.
The U of M Sailing Club was originated in 1938 by a small group
of sailing addicts, and has been in continuous operation ever since.
In addition to organizing itself, the Club here has actively beat the
drums for the sport in other schools in the area. The great strides
made in this direction were shown last weekend when the First Annual
U of M Regatta was held on Whitmore Lake.
THIS impetus is being provided, it must be stressed, not by the Uni-
versity, but by the individual efforts of students. The Club now
numbers around 55, according to its Commodore, Bob Schroder. This
figure could easily be five times as great-over 200 applications have
been turned down in the past year.
This is not an evidence of snobbishness. The Club faces ter-
rific problems. In the first place, the membership must of neces-
sity be proportioned to the number of boats, and the number of
boats proportioned to the amount of cash on hand. Although they
represent the University in regattas throughout the East, they
have never received any aid in any form from the school. The
entire cost of road trips is paid by individual members of the Club.
The other great problem is that of facilities. At present the Club
operates from makeshift quarters in the basement of a roller rink out
at Whitmore. As its publicity director,' Ted Souris, says, "The U of M
Club is the center of the Intercollegiate Yacht Racing Association's
midwestern activities, but unless the club's facilities are improved it
will not be able to assume such leadership."
T HE CLUB is at present under the Office of Student Affairs but the
officers have talked to Assistant Athletic Director Ernie McCoy
about the possibilities of placing the sport under the University. It is
practically impossible to make it a varsity activity because it would
entail the restriction of membership to those making the team, which
is against all the desires of the group.
The best suggestion, which the Club is now working on, is to
place the sport within the Intramural set-up. This would provide#
the group with University financial support. However the question
of sponsoring inter-collegiate meets is a different matter.
Conceivably, some such system as this could be worked out in the
future: after the sport has become assimilated and given a sound
basis in the Intramural program, the top performers (probably those
making trips on their own in the meantime) could be formed into ,a
varsity squad and a regular intercollegiate schedule inaugurated.
BASEBALL GREAT:
Sisler Begins Diamond
Career with W olverines

Ot M'Teams
Virtually snowed out of their
By ARCHIE PARSONS ball game with Michigan Normal
Reporting on alleged racial dis- yesterday by the man who makes
crimination on University of with the weather. Michigan turns
its baseball eye back t h i
Michigan athletic teams. Jim I toahe Big
Nine tomorrow whenitakso
Brieske, a member of the Student thecellar--dwelling Boilermaers
Legislature, said at a meeting last from Purdue.
night that "it is highly improb- If everything goes right, the two
able that there is any racial dis- game week-end series with the
crimination on the part of the Riviters should boost the Wolver-
Michigan coaching staff." ines back into the thick of the
He quoted Athletic Director i conference title race. They rate
Herbert O. "Fritz" Crisier as say- the favorite role over Purdue on
ing, "There is no discrimination, the strength of their twin-killing
over Iowa last Saturday since the
either legislative or through a Hawkeyes swept two from Purdue
'gentleman's agreement' with oth- earlier in the season.
er schools, and any Negro may Rough Going
become a candidate for any ath- Despite an impressive 6-0 record
letic team, receiving equal con- in non-conference games-includ-
sideration with all others."
"Candidates are not considered
in regard to their group connec- G iiistw t
tions," the report quoted Crisler Gymnastic practice is being
as saying. "Religion, fraternity, held every afternoon in Water-
and color lines have no signifi- man Gym, starting at 3 p.m.
canoe in athletic participation, Coach Newton Loken is look-
it continued. ing for new material for next
Limited participation of Ne- year's gymnastic team. Any
gros in athletics, and their com- man with any experience at
plete absence in some sports was all should report to him at the
attributed to economic and psy- above time.
cho-environmental factors. "Most
promising Negro athletes are us-
ually not in a position to attend
college because of financial rea-
sons," the report said. ANN ARBOR B
Difficulty in placing Negroes in
jobs on campus, especially board now under th
jobs, and the lack of athletic
scholarships at Michigan, were
given as other economic factors,
according to Brieske's report. CLASSES N
The report said that it is diffi-
cult to understand why Negroes TYPING
do not seem to be proficient in SHORTHAND
certain phases of athletics, such ACCOUNTING
as swimming, golf, tennis, wrest-
ling, and distance running. "Many Evening School - 6t
people attribute it to the physical Day School -- 9f
make-up of the Negro, but an- 330 Nickels Arcades
thropologists would tend to dis-
agree," the report said. ---- --_

ing wins over Notre Dame, Evans-
ville and Eau Claire--Coach Mel
Taube's boys have found league
competition a little too rough and
dropped another set to Ohio State
Saturday to drop into the confer-
ence basement with ak0-4 record.
Still, the Boilermakers can be
tough when they want to as wit-
nessed by the battle they gave the
Buckeyes last week before bow-
ing 4-3 in 11 innings. Taube has
indicated he will send his veteran
righthander, Irv Claseman against
Wolverine Cliff Wise in the Fri-
day shindig.
Southpaw To Hurl
Then for the third straight Sat-
urday, the Maize and, Blue will
have to face southpaw slants when
Erv Noel, and up and coming lefty,
squares off against Walter "Bud~
Rankin or Dick Schmidtke.
Stany Ayers will be behind the
plate for Purdue tomorrow with
Monroe Sorge, Bill Berberian,
Johnny Galvin and Steve Rudacis'
in the infield and Olin Martin, My
Anderson and Merl Ganzin the
outfield. Galvin is currently the
hottest thing in conference bat-
ting circles with a torrid .470 av-
erages. Martin is hitting a credible
.333.
JSINESS SCHOOL

Report Denies
Discriminatio"

Cold Cancels Baseball Game;
Purdue Next for Wolverines

NEED A
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COLORED AND FANCY T-SHIRTS

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DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
a year or two of teaching experi-
ence, to Malaya. For further in-
formation call at the Bureau of
Appointments.
University Community Center
1045 Midway
Willow Run Village
Thurs., May 8, 8 p.m., Extension
Class in Psychology; 8 p.m., The
New Art Group.
Fri., May 9, 8 p.m., Duplicate
Bridge.
Sat, May 10, 6 p.m., Pot Luck
Supper.
Lectures
University Lecture: Dr. H. P.
Himsworth, professor of medicine,
University College, London, will
(Continued on Page 4)
Keep A-Head of Your Hair
Have you tried our
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THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State

By GLORIA VREELAND
George Sisler, baseball's Hall of
Fame first baseman, who is con-
sidered by many the greatest ball
player of all time,began his swift
ascent to Major League acclaim
by striking out twenty batters in
an intramural contest played in
Ann Arbor, May 1, 1911.
Stars as Freshman
He was just a freshman engi-
neer at the time, hurling against
a team of lawyers. But that game
gives him the distinction of being
the only Hall-of-Famer ever te
strike out that many batters in
one game.
Branch Rickey, then eoci ing
the Wolverines, was rushed to the
scene of action to view the end
of this strike-out spree. Sisler,
needless to say, became a varsity
regular the following year.
Goes to St. Louis
Four years later the boy from
Manchiester, Ohio donned a St.
Louis Brown uniform to play once
again under the baseball Mahat-
ma's leadership. He made his first
appearance as a relief hurler a-
gainst the White Sox, but the
following day Rickey had him
guarding first base where he be-
came a fixture except when he
took his turn on the mound,
Perhaps Sisler's greatest feat
as a pitcher against American
League competition was a 1-0 duel
he captured on September 17, 1916
from the king of the fast ball,
Walter Johnson.
As a batting expert, the one-

'
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; - , . ''
\ a ,<
z
. ti_:

time Michigan engineer has a life-
time total of 2,812 safeties, 505
of which he manufactured in the
Senior Circuit while playing for
the Braves. His life-time batting
average is a cool .340.
Beats Out Cobb
Sisler's number one accomplish-
ment occurred in 1922 when he
collected just the necessary num
ber of hits to squeeze by the
in i g h t y Ty Cobb's American
League record for the season's
batting average. The then Brown-
ie boasts a mark of .41980 com-
pared to Cobb's nevertheless re-
spectable .41963.
The present 3.iuber of (t'
Dodgers' "Brain Trust" estab-
lished many impressive marks, in-
cluding 257 safe knocks in 1920,
10 hits in a row in 1921, and a
41-game hitting streak in 1922.
But eye trouble halted his career
the following season and his rec-
ord after that was never as out-
standing. What Sisler's record
might have been if unchecked by
faulty vision is a matter worthy
of conjecture.
The Big Moment
___- by M MKWA'EL E
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-49 , college stores and druggists.

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