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April 30, 1947 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-04-30

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PA P T

TH iN 1At

WEDINESM1Y, ;pUU, , qi,

Dr. BlakemanI
To Hold New
Religious Post
'Research Consultant"
To Be New 'U' Title
Dr. Edward W. Blakeman, coun-
selor in religious education, will
hold the title of research consul-
tant in religious education, effec-
tive May 1, Provost James P.
Adams has announced.
Dr. Blakeman has resigned from
his position so that he can devote
his time to research project upon
which he has been working for
several years. He will continue to
serve as consultant to President
Alexander G. Ruthven in matters
related to religious education.
The study on which Dr. Blake-
man is working is a survey of the
administration of religion in state
universities and colleges, being
conducted under the auspices of
the Committee on Cooperation
with Religious Agencies of the Na-
tional Association of State Uni-
versities. President Ruthven is
chairman of this committee.
Provost Adams pointed out that
"in recent years special considera-
tion has been given to the ques-
tion of religion in the educational
plans of many colleges and uni-
versities." The committee and the
Association hope and expect that
Dr. Blakeman's study will throw
new light on this problem and the
ways and means by which it is be-
ing met in the several hundred in-
stitutions included in his survey,
Provost Adams concluded.
Lee White To
Discuss Press
"A Free and Responsible Press,"
recent report of the Conmimission on
Freedom of the Press, will be dis-
cussed by Lee White, public rela-
tions director of the Detroit News,
at a meeting of the University
Journalism Society, at 8 p.m. to-
day in Room E, Haven Hall.
The Commission's inquiry into
press freedom, headed by Robert
M. Hutchins, chancellor of the
University of Chicago, which re-
ported "deliBerate falsifications
and reckless mis-statementfs of
fact," was financed by grants of
$200,000 from Time, Inc., and $15,-
000 from Encyclopedia Britannica,
Inc., and included within its scope
the radio, newspapers, motion pic-
tures, magazines and books. Mr.
White's talk is open to the public.
Coffee will be served.

Campus Highlights

Brazi' Liecture...
Earl Thomas, Grad., teaching
fellow in the Romance Language1
department, will discuss "Brazil"1
at 8 p.m. today in Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
As a University exchange fellow,
Thomas spent two years (1941-42)1
in Brazil. His talk will include in-
formation about the little-known
interior provinces of Southern
Brazil.
The lecture is the fourth in a
series sponsored by Phi Iota Alpha,
Latin American fraternity, and the
International Center. Other coun-
tries which have been discussed
are Uruguay, Ecuador and Co-
lumbia.
Stuielt Recia li.
Robert Holland, music school
student, will present a song re-
cital at 8:30 p.m. today at Rack-
ham Assembly Hall.
The program, which will be
open to the public, wiill include
selections by Mozart, Schumann,
Watts and Delius.
Deutscher Verein .. .
The German Club of Wayne
University will be at a meeting of
Deutscher Verein at 8 p.m. today
in Rm. 302 of the Union.
The Wayne students will pre-
sent "Meisterschaft," a comedy by
Mark Twain, at the meeting.
Plans for a forthcoming picnic
will be discussed.
: - -$
Bible Study Group ...
The Michigan Christian Fel-
lowship will hold its weekly Bi-
ble Study at 8 p.m. today at
Lane Hall.
French Comedy
To lie Presented
Moliere's comedy, "Le Malade
Imaginaire," will be presented by
Le Cercle Francais at 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Richard Koppitch, graduate
student and teaching fellow, will
play the leading role of Argan.
Supporting players are Sonya
Drews, Marian Sayward, Amy
Wallace and James Evans.

'Enr .iian' i r" ting ;...
A meeting l>r a:teIs i-
terested in petitionin lfo junior
positions on the 1948 Ensian will
be held at 4 p.m. today at i S u-
dent Publications ol iding.
Students unable to atttid i I
meeting should contact Lorele i
Nierman at 2-5587 or 2-3241.
* * *
Education Films . .
Four motion pictures, "De-
mocracy," "Despotism," "Ameri-
cans All," and "The House I
Live In," will be shown at 4:15
p.m. tomorrow in Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
The films are sponsored by
the Bureau of Visual Educa-
tion.
* * *
Faculty-Student Tea . . .
A Faculty-student tea, honoring
members of the zoology and bot-
any department will be held from
3:30 to 4:30 p.m. tomorrow in the
Russian Tea Room of the League.
IRA To Meet .. .
The Inter-Racial Association
will meet at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow
in the League to consider picket-
ing "Song of the South" and
"Abie's Irish Rose," to hear a re-
port on discrimination in city
restaurants, and to discuss a
course in Negro history.
Plans will also be made for art
IRA picnic to be held May 11.
* * *
Song oncert . . .
Earl Owen Bates, music school
student will give a clarinet recital
at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow at Rackham
Assembly Hall.
He will be accompanied by
Mildred Minneman Andrews, pi-
anist; and William Klenz, 'cel-
list.
The program will be open to the
public.
Ruthven in Wshingtou
Pres. Alexander G. Ruthven is in
Washington, D. C. this week at-
tending a meeting of the Na-
tional Association of Americatn
Universities.

Karl Shapiro
Karl Shapiro, young American
poet, will discuss problems in
poetry and read from his own
work in lecture at 4:15 p.m. today
in Kellogg Auditorium.
Shapiro attracted attention just
before the war and continued his
work during the war, writing his
best known volume, "Essay on
Rime," while he was stationed in
the South Pacific. He has been
called "a very talented poet" by
critics.
Essay on Rime," which makes
the problems of poetry themselves
the subject matter of the poem, is
the latest example of the verse-
essay form, which has been used
by Horace, Boileau and Pope. "Es-
;ay on Rime," however, is writ-
ten in blank verse and attempts
to use language emotionally and
not as number," as Shapiro wrote.
It is a study of the confusions and
obscurities confronting the mod-
ern poet, and contains many eval
uations of the famous poets.
Other volumes of verse that have
attracted attention include "Per-
son, Place and Thing" and "V-
Letter."
Read and Use
Daily Classified Ads

Atitalesn Deans and
A Adve'irs Opens Today

ASSOCIATION MEETS:

I

STONE FLOWER-Vladimir Druzhnikov plays Danila, the sculp-
tor, and Tamara Makarova plays the Lady of Copper Mountain
in "Stone Flower," new Russian color film with English titles to
be presented by the Art Cinema League at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow
throjigh Saturday at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.

mtfg 01 the National Associa~
tion of Deans and Advisors of Men
will be held at 7:30 p.m. today in
the Union.
Provost James P. Adams will
welcome the Association to the
campus. The other speaker of the
evening will be Dean J. J. Som-
erville of Ohio Wesleyan College.
The invocation will be given by
Dean Garner Hubbell of Prin-
cipia College, and Dean Arno No-
wotony of the University of Texas
will preside.
Program for the conference in-
cludes a series of sectional meet-
ings on special topics and two pro-
gram sessions. Dean Christian
Gauss of Princeton University and
Dr. Otis C. McCreery, director of
training for the Aluminum Com-
pany of America will be the prin-
cipal speakers at the general
meetings.
Dean Gauss will deliver the key-
- 0- o -
Diamoends,-
and s
Wedding
s Cn
ings
717 North University Ave.
->0<:::0<=::>0=:::-0<=::><mr

note address at IIt first general
session at 9:30 a.m. tomorrow in
the Union. Dr. MeCreery will dis-
cuss The Relationship of Educa-
tion Personnel Work to Industrial
Personinel WVork" at the second
general meeting Friday morning.
Scott Goodnight. emeritus dean
of men at the University of Wis-
consin, will speak at the annual
banquet of the Association to be
held at 6:30 p.m. Friday in the Un-
ion Ballroom. Installation of of-
ficers will also be held Friday.
COLLEGE
A School of Business-Preferred by
College Men and Women
4 MONTH
INTENSIVE COURSE
SECRETARIAL TRAINING FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS AND GRADUATES
A thorough intensive course-starting
'une: (ctober, February. Bul-
letin A on request
SPECIAL COUNSELOR for G.I. TRAINING
Regular Day and Evening Schools
Throughout the Year. Catalog
SPresident, John Robert Gregg, S.C.D.
Director, Pauli . Pai, M.A,
THE GREGG COLLEGE
Dept. NW, 6N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 2

4

4

Russian Film
To Be Shown
"Stone Flower," first-run Rus-
sian film with English titles, will
be presented by the Art Cinema
League at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow
through Saturday at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Filmed in natural color by a se-
cret process, the picture is based
on an old folk legend. It has re-
ceived favorable comment by New
York critics and has broken all
American attendance records for
Soviet films.
"Life at the Zoo," Russian short
subject based on experiments with
the behavior of animals, will also
be shown.
Tickets may be purchased from
2 to 8:30 p.m. today through Sat-
urday at the theatre box office.
Coittest o Begin
The preliminary competition in
the all-campus freshman public
speaking contest, sponsored by the
speech department, will be held at
5 p.m. tomorrow in Rm. 4203 An-
gell Hall.
All second semester freshmen
may enter the contest on presenta-
tion of their eligibility cards.

New Station
Will Operate
A second radio station licensed
to broadcast night and day on a
power of 1,000 watts, will begin op-
eration this fall at Ann Arbor, it
was learned yesterday.
The new station, with call let-
ters WHRV, will be managed b
James F. Hopkins, present man-
ager of a Detroit statior

14

A

y

NEW STYLES FIRST AT WILD'S
but make sure they're
Grey Flannels

100%
Virgin Wool
Loomed
and ,r
Tailored
by
GOODAL L
$ .50

,; :.
.... N:

You'll live in pants . . . chopped-off-at-the-kneg
pants like these with deep, well turned cuffs.

IT'S SPORTSWEAR TIME AGAIN and time to
think about adding another pair of slacks to your
wardrobe . . . especially a pair of handsome grey
flannel slacks . . . made of 100% virgin wool by
Goodall . . . tailored exclusively by Goodall, too.
Other features that make Goodall's grey flannel slacks
an outstanding value are their perfect color and lux-
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SMARTY PANTS* is the name .. they come
in lush Golden West colors. They're made of
pin-wale corduroy to wear and wear. Belt loops,
too, ... a challenge for your most imaginative
belt! Sizes 12 . 18. at 64 p
Worn by June Priesser, starring in "High School
Hero." a Mono-ram Picture.

i

IEN'

I

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