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April 24, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

Tilt AMirTTTC7&N fl 717T

r- TRTPJR DAY, AIP'RIL24, 194-4

_ _. .. i I .. . __....._____ __...... ._. _

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M

HOLIDAY FOR KIDS:
'U' Fresh Air Camp flenef its
Told by Student Counsellors

I

Counselling at the University
Fresh Air Camp was a "wonder-
ful experience" and nothing wE
have d onle in our lives can be com-
pared 'With it, Jane McKee ant
Patricia Burns, graduate student,,
in education and sociology, said o.
their work last summer.
"It's hard to realize what on
summer of good food and livint
conditions can do for these under-
privileged kids whose vacation i,
made, possible through the fund,
donated to the Tag Day sales,'
.Jame said. For some of the boy,
thje ,ummner was the first time they
hrad, ever been swimming or hik-
ing, or had the experience of threE
squiare( meals a day, These kid:
'never knew what meal it was-they
all seemed like dinner. "There wa,
on(, boy. who wanted to save hic
dless ert each day to send home tc
rh is itt(fl e brother," Pat added.
Grokip Living
Some boys got their first chance
at g roup living at the Fresh Air
camnp, Jane said. This situation
OUR PR~ICE:
a Week;days until 5 P.M., 25c
Evenings and Sundays, 30c
-Last Day Today -
* NOTORIOUS
Ingrid Bergman, Cary Grant
and-
' .BETTY CO-ED
with Jan Savitt
-- Friday and Saturday -
LADY LUCK
-- -and
DEVIL'S PLAYGROUND
IMICHIIGANAV

y' B.rought out many unsuspected tal-
uts and it also helped to over-
ome many of their prejudices,
'at declared. "At the end of the
ummer, lots of boys who had
reviously said that they didn't
*vant to live with Negroes found
ut that the Negro boys were no
lifferent from the kids on their
wn street."
rThe camp gave the counselors
the unusual opportunity to comn-
)ine theory and practice. They had
our weeks of classes and four
veeks in charge of a cabin of boys.
' Because of our familiarity with
E he personalities of the boys we
were able to realize the connection
)etween. what we were learning in
c lasses and our experience as
C ounselors."
r In Arbor Dav
4The boys were allowed as much
freedom as possible, but stress was
eput upon group activity. "When
rthe city-bred boys got tired off the
2camp routine we would take them
into Ann Arbor for the day. They
were always impressed with the
University and part of the day was
spent inspecting the bells of the
carillon tower, mounting the lions
in front of the museum and look-
ing with interest at students prac-
ticing in the music school."
At the end of the summer most
of the kids expressed a keen de-
sire to return to th~e camnp, Pit and
Jane agreed, "One of the kids was
so reluctant to go bone that he
tried to mniss the bus on the last
day."
ENSIAN SALES
ON CAMPUS FRIDAY
Playin~g throuagh
SaturdayI

.high Cost 'of
Govern ment
Is Discu.sse d
The presence of over-staffed,
under-managed, and in some
cases, unnecessary governmental
agencies was cited as a major fac-
tor in the high cost of government
by T. Coleman Andrews in an ad-
dress here last night.
The tendency of agency admin-
istrators to enhance the impor-
tance of their activities has ac-
counted for much over-staffing,
and low salary scales have dis-
couraged many young men with
mjanagerial skills, Andrews ex-
plained.
Careful Examination
He expressed the. belief that
many of the activities have ex-
pended their usefulness and should
be subjected to careful re-exami-
nation with a view towarcts elirai-
nation.
There is little hope of perma-
nent tax reductions with new bur-
dens in the form of old age pen-
sions, and additional soil conser-
vation and price support measures,
in the offing, Andrews stated. The
situation is not improved by the
fact that everyone wants lower
taxes but no trimming of benefi-
cial activities, lie said.
Cause of Burden
Andrews outlined the basic
cause of our present tax burden as
the widespread apathy existing
among the people which has pre-
vented their discharging their
duties as citizens. This fact is
borne out, he explained, by the
present philosophy of borrow and
spend which has displaced the
earlier feeling that expenditure
and taxation are one arid the
same, and by their continued si-
lence in the enactment of new leg-
islation.

I

10CO N D rC T -Prof. IDavid
Ita tteri l of the n iii t. skiCool will
Ciiidt 30,the (University NMen's
614-1:- ('11.1) in its iunnal13 qrini
C11c i'tto b I-Id -1l Atflp.m. th)-
dlay in Htill AudL itiun
-1Wllikh-eld
"Resolvd that the lede a gov-
erment sho(uld provide a sy,,-ern
of complete medical care avrail-
able to all c:itizen s at pub] ie ex -
ps''will be the tolaic of tiis'
stale clianipionship debate to be
held at 8 pi'Un. tomorrow as ap a t
of the annutal Forensic Dao. pon-
sored by the l itiveisity 11XIA .°.1011i
Serv ice.

Aeeped Nqm
Applications for the College
Honois Program in Liberal Arts.
w~hir h will offer seminars- in poli-
tics and ethics, in the aretesof
literary expression arid in the dre-
vvlop ment of science, arec now be-
ingl a ccepJted for 1the fll1 eester
tPrOf. Jchil Arthos.. of the EngLlish;i
tudents, OL junior standcing who
hzave conIipilccd their group --
qu11(irernent.:s and lhave maI!1inaIne
at lasL t a1 vera, z-C.ar'_eligible
?IIii ; 1 Po ur'"tt , th e r i'auli i ch c:, f "to pr"
;I "ist of er( d in1939 1111
uppoI tuili y1to tud asbtotu
1xide11e; e l 1i%( tv:4ousie l
thea ir - ation0progrblos,'6
grhm stonrs.semienar el! -aci
ofacomplastelyasmrallva rinn'e
3of oos,"of. r thost eetpoite1d
tuto roe aeekptosiscisss ktey
upon ksthey hadtv been reingof th
tet iepaicuar. bjct(f atuy
Ram tressIajestecaeurad
oif crOfipaticlyaersmal l runei
upoe eng ndrsompring o'theF

f 77t'f J'fl'f Tt 7i 7 PYf 9P /'l 'R. T 7 Y Y M P ' ' t""1 Y'n !° r

J(IX~tRS:I Jhinson (Cires

o) I IIt ' eeo e:,n utr n
I~t 14+I1 i 1"lI M (I(e IMO l _r o f 1rekpinluence i n
thell Studenft' f ritc no P lctn ie
ome "subject 'p ?.!ai<iig to 1,s JohnsonU'1 s~oke on ''T " ax-
ear1'l"ir group stuy. 1 '4 !c ;ap_.i~ Utt ion i!'he Byzatline tPeriod"' in
then1 ubnnttecl fo" honors il t ai . te . t h'lliinas pe',i' J1er oie
t'! d 0 11 teiii. letr: esIrtuy. aThe 10grow th of
Studntsdesrin to(ilT IAIC'the~vilag beIun mportant af-
Hono!(Ir Prgram nextM alil may ti t'e :!itax"for everyone ('was
applyi "_ 3 to Dean harleI(;1i.t. N ae ori)ns: i ii iled. ra1rher th (anllite pi'e-
to Prof. Saly ogProf.!Ar- x ions tax, which 1ws lix io
tho sad. ni I eopehesaidl.

To (ive alk
''Iunin 0 u .mmtlI( 1.ighjt of
at Obewi liii College-, a 5pn
Prof. Erise leilliscssthe sg
nificanee 01 zrecet dcii;cov er ies of
ancith nt ypes in1 ChA ) :. in a ,
Jav\a, and elsewhere.\
Close studyV of the latter prob-
lemn has t akeni Prof. EiseleyV on
nu~merous paentological a:nd an-
tliropological expeditionls to the
gret pla1iins and lsouthteastern reg-

Gold n : Brown Chicken
or [nred Jumnbo S~rimp
Honelame mdeDoilsand In-dividual IPits
We Deliver Anywhere, Anytime

I

*I

Contriuac; Ironin 1 PM 7W .9

-NOW-

L

SHIGHLIGHTS ON CAMPUS

CRRETIN
TII LY VIA '(iEITS

I

as

Mic hig ras
April 25-26

' I

°'-

1
a

Piano Riecihal . .
Mildred Mirmneman Andrews,
pianist, will present a recital in
RackhlarnA .semnbly Hll at 8:*30
p~m. today.
Miss Andrews, will play three
sonatas by Scarlatti as well as
selections by Sc hubert. lti de
mthm, andl schumaimlt1
Music Lecture.
Prof. Theodore Hager of the
mi-usic school will live a lecture
on "The Miusic To Be Presented
at the May Festival," under the
auspices of the womeni of the
faculty, at 8:15 p.m. today.

t.

North Main Opposite Court Hlouse
®- Today and Friday -
Gene Tierney in
"SHANGHAI GESTURE"
plus
Charles Starrett in
FIGHTING FRONTIERSMAN
"Golden Hen" Cartoon

Percival Price, University
Carillonneur, will present it
carillon, recital at '7.15 pan. to-
day.
The program will include se-
lections written by British,
French, ,Italian, and American
coiqjo dsers. As a special feature
tic will also present several Uni-
vers:ity of Michigan songs in-
cluding "The Yellow and Blue"
anti ."Victors."
*k g
IHiuianities Lecture
"The Bar-oque and the Search
for Basic Concepts" will be the
subject of an illustrated talk by
Dr. Ernest C. Hassold, head of the
E;ngllish department and division
oflihumanit ies at the University
ofll ILouisville, at 8 p.m. today iii
the lRackhani Amph itheatre.

C) igirially Scheduled 11105., April 22

8:15 P. M.

I

I

In Pcattengill Auditorium of AnI Arbor High School
Tickets Dated April 22, 19417, Veilid April 24, 1947
30 MALE CHARLES IRENE
VOICES TAYLOR. BOICE
Conductor Pianist
ROSE SUZANNE DE RIERIAN, Guest Artis t

S)pons .ored by
he Ann Arbor I heh School Recreation Crept.

4

Sun day-
HEDY LAMARR
in
'Strange Woman'

Also

Tate talk will be precededr
the gr-oup a t ':1 .

y.4 s.
oh'

Also
1CARTOON IIIINEWS
-Coming Sunday..
"SONG O
THESOUTH"

MUSICAL - NEWS -- CARTOON

TEXAS DISASTER

f

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F
1
s
f
t

2
The Za y

gets te1E11VCAIO

b.

ii1 Mr t

MICHIGAN--ONTARIO
GREAT LAKES AREA

A
p
V
q4
W
4
x
IV
N
G
C.
h
P
h
J

THE SOUTHWEST
Greyhound's best to see the West

64

La Sociedad Hispanica will Pre-
sent the special pageant "A 'Trip
through Latin America" at 8 p.m.
today in Rm. 318 of the Union.
Characteristic (dances, sogsind
poems of ILatin A 1cirP'ami ('oun1-
tries will be featn i'ed.
James M. Osborn, i'esearch as-
sot ;e t , Yalea University, will1
speak Onl "Edmuitnd Malone's Part
in Exposing I lie Chatterton For'-
geries" before the English Jour-
iial Club at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the
East Conference Room of the
Rackh am Buildinig.
'flit foirmer' editor of "Work in
Prg ress," Osborn is the author of
a biography of Dr'ydeni. At present
lie is working on a study of Ma-
lone, who was one of the great edi-
tors in the late 18th Centuinry.
11i eritatil i le" ..
Miss Joanne Bturbidge, rep-
irese&ntiative of the cultural at-
tiach's office of the British Em-
ba ssyv, will be a guest of the Uni-
versity C'ommuittee on Itnter-
culturval Relations at tea at 4:30
p.m. today ini the International
Center.
During her visit in Annm Arbor,
M1liss Burbidge will nmeeAtMiss
(~wy netts Bevan, British ex-
chiange teacher in the Alne Arbar
Publie schools.
Fr-enchl. Films ...
T1hree F'i'efilh films will be pre-
5eiited kby LeCerele franeais vt
4:10 p.mi. today, Yin. D, Alumni
Memorial Blall as the last in1 a se-
vies of lectures and priograms held
duringfite yeztrby theile rench
elIii b.
No adisision will be charged for
the program.

73

QUICK WORK ON
PRINTING NEEDS

.2Y1._ L r tc-:

{er IC/ 4df . 4

-- liii 'I
- - - - --- ------- - -'-------'--- II I

POSTERS
HANDBILLS

n

WASHINGTON
See it in Cherry Blossom Time

*INVITATIONS
* STATIONERY
* PROGRAMS
ItAMSAY-CAI ELD)
Inc.
Opposite P-Bell
119 E. Liberty Phone 7900
QLMATINpepaaou rdipto-
SCHOOL: matic service, interna-
tional admninistration,.
and diplomatic se're -
tarial work.
PUBLIC Complete program in
RELATIONS the fild of publei' e-
SCHOOL: lations and publicity.
BUSINESS Complete business, sec.-
SCHOOL: reta rialI, stenographic
training in E1glishi
Spanuish,.Pr~t~'e
French1.
L.ANGUJAGE Elementary, inttrmieci-
SCHOOL: ate and advanced panla
ir1i, POrtr-ig u'st, Cer'-
Fua,1rench, ILni ,1~i.
FOREIGN i--piort proc'eduire,('on-
COM~MERcE ,'utar documen ts.i-al'
SCHOOL*: ,eign credits and collee-
tions. Foreign trade,
i transportation, tral ic,
air freight.
Co-educational. 0.1. Approved
Catalog "c",: 116 S. Mich., (Chicago
Catalog "C": 116 S. Michi., Chicago
New York: 11 W. 42nd St. Write See,

\'oted the most wanltedl pCf for graduatiou
r Yer
.4. Y
I.

Spring Sports for Everyone

THE SOUTHEAST

NEW YORK STATE
' * Fun's begun along the Countryside

GREAT SMOKIES
Meet Sprig in our largest
National Park

-.j

And:. Gets So Much More Out of it .. by
GRE11YHOUND
For a fun-filled, carefree vacation in Michigan or
elsewhere this year: First,. go early! Start in April
or May for first choice accommodations-and to see
America at its springtime best. Second, go Greyhound!
Comfortable coaches on convenient schedules go
direct to all of America's playgrounds. And fanres
remain amazingly low, for example:

1 k
at the rO sign
Special Student Breakfasts
7:00 - 11:.00A. M.

Parker "SI" Pens are available in
the follo wing colors.' Black, 1l%,
C'edar, CDove Grayn, Cordovan lBrou . r
$12.50:.$15.00. Pencils: $I.M;
$7. 50. ac'ulnatic Penst $5.75.

PLAN TO WRITE YOUR WAY TO SUM~S
WITH THE WORMDS MOST WANTED PEN
Seniors at 20 great universities, coast to coast, have'
made Parker their first choice-more w anted than the
next three 'makes combined! H-ere is a pen of rare beauty
and precision-perfectly balanced-eager to %Vite.
Writing is actually firn with a ""51". Its tubular point
starts instantly. Each stroke is smooth and silenit, This,
too, is the pen that writes th-j, with -it t ink !
So whether you're graduating this y ear or later, get a
"51" nowv. Let it help you write your wa,,y to success.
For gr'aduation, your birthday, or wha;: tevetr the next gift
occasion may be-ask for thc x o ;id's miost-wanted
pen . . . Parker "51". T1he hPaihcr Pen ('emripany,
S1ant-sv ilk', ason~ nrd oronlo, ( aiiadla.

. TODAY' LUNCHEON SPECIALS U

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