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April 22, 1947 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-04-22

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PAGE TWO

THlE MICIHWAN DAILY

TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1947

- . - ,

SHAW DRAMA:
Halstead Rates 'Saint Joan'
Best Play on Martyr's Life

By NAOMI STERN
"George Bernard Shaw's play
'Saint Joan' is by far the best of
the dramatizations of the life of
the French Martyr," Prof. William
Halstead, of the speech depart-
Cafeteria...
(Continued from Page 1)
allegedly clean glasses, dirty sifver-
ware, warmed-over food, stale
cake, and "microscopic" meatl
portions. A former Army mess of-
ficer felt that the cooking of the
food is "terrible," as is the quan-
tity and quality.
"In a place connected with a
college," the former officer said,
"cleanliness should be paramount.
In other words, clean the place up
and let's have better service."
Members of the committee who
assisted Klein in distributing the
forms, in tabulating the returns
and in interpreting the results
were Robert Amos, James Rhea,
Richard Eichbauer, Charles Dray-
ton, Gayle Thompson, Virginia
Myerson, Carroll Barber, Arthur
Vogel, John Berk and Al Levinson.
Village AVG
To Hold Panel
Conflicting views on pending
labor legislation and its ramifi-
cations will be thrashed out at a
panel discussion sponsored by the
Willow Village AVC at 8 p.m. to-
day at the North Community
Building.
Irving Fink will be the moder-
ator at the meeting, which will
place an emphasis on the ques-
tion of the closed shop, industry-
wide bargaining and some of the
more controversial aspects of the
bills currently awaiting action in
Congress.
The speakers, all Village resi-
dents with special training in la-
bor legislation, will be Phil West-
brook, Charles Blackman, Jerry
1McCroskey and James Rhea.
Cbntinuous from 1 P.M.
-Today & Wednesday .-

ment, director of the production.
said in an interview yesterday.
The play will be presented by
the speech department's play pro-
duction classes at 8:30 p.m.
Thursday through Saturday in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
"We had been planning to pro-
duce 'Saint Joan' for a long
time," Prof. Halstead said, ex-
plaining that he was reminded of
"Joan" while attempting to cut
Shakespeare's "Henry VI" to "act-
able length" and came across the
character of the French Saint.
Reinterprets Character r
"Shaw does much more than
merely present dramatic incidents
in Joan's life," Prof. Halstead
said. "He attempts a complete
reinterpretation of her character
taking a middle road in regard to
previous character dramatiza-
tions of her life."
Writers, such as Shakespeare,
supported the idea that Joan was
actually a witch and hinted at
scandals in their interpretations,
Prof. Halstead said. Other writ-
ers, Schiller and Mark Twain for
example, accepted Joan uncondi-
tionally as a saint and painted her
as such.
Careful Research
Shaw, who did much careful re-
search before he wrote his drama,
found evidence in the records of
the trials that although Joan may
have been perfectly sincere, the
trials were completely fair and
Joan, through her persistent re-
fusals to recant, left the Church
officials with no choice except ex-
communication, Prof. Halstead
said.
"Shaw presents Joan as the
pure saint, but the priests are also
treated sympathetically," he de-
clared.
Conflicts and Struggles
"Great admiration is shown for
Joan in the play, but Shaw's in-
tellectual mind was concerned not
only with dramatizing her life but
with presenting the conflict be-
tween the Catholics and Protest-
ants and the struggle between
feudalism and nationalism in the
middle ages," Prof Halstead con-
cluded.
Tickets for all performances of
the production are on sale at the
theatre box-office.
Direct ancestors of the "moun-
tain shrimp" in Australian streams
can be traced back millions of
years.
Light Lunches
..SOups
...SALADS
SANDWICHES
COKES
8:00 A.M.-10:30 P.M.
Weekdays
8:00 A.M.-12:30 P.M.
Friday-Saturday
Clark's Tea Room
217 Observatory

Hllepoppin
Skit Show Set
For Saturday
Receipts Marked for
Jewish Appeal Fund
Six student groups will vie for
originality and humor honors in
"Hillelzapoppin," all campus stunt
show to be given at 8 p.m. Satur-
day at Ann Arbor High School.
The skits, entitled "From Adam
to Atom," "Back in the Days of
the Greeks," "Trial by Jury,"
"Scream Girl," "Broadway Was
Never Like This" and "It's a
Stinkin' Life" will be judged by a
committee of faculty members.
Professors To Judge
Professors Kenneth T. Rowe
and Frank Huntley of the English
department, Prof. Hugh Z. Nor-
ton of the speech department,
Prof. Urie Bronfenbrenner of the
psychology department, and Prof.
Arthur Hackett of the music school.
will be the judges.
Proceeds from the 'show, which
is sponsored by the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation, will be turned
over to the United Jewish Appeal.
Central Committee
Members of the central commit-
tee of the show are Blanche Berg-
er, chairman; Shirlee Rich, assist-
ant chairman; Clarice Bercey and
Warren Weil, directors.
Other members are Audrey Ene-
low, Betty Blumberg, Bob Klein,
Abe Ackerman, Dan Tannenbaum,
Lorelei Nierman, Gladys Relkin,
Gladys Savitt, Aviva Shanoff, Joan
Silverman and Paula Zerman.
Tickets may be purchased at the
Union, the League, the Hillel
Foundation or on the diagonal.
Plan Talks on
High Schools
A conference on "What Consti-
tutes High School Work" will be
held at 2 p.m. Thursday in the
Union under the auspices of the
Bureau of Cooperation with Edu-
cational Institutions.
The discussion, according to
Prof. George E. Carrothers, Bur-
eau director, will deal with the
problem of whether high school
credit should be given students
who must make up fundamental
grade school work in high school.
Prof. Richard C. Boys, of the
English department, will explain
wha tstandards the University ex-
pects to be represented in high
school credits listed by entering
students.
Charles H. Senler, principal of
Benton Harbor High School, and
M. C. Wolf, principal of Marletta
School, will discuss the provisions
made in their schools for award-
ing credit for grade school work
done in high school.
Open discussions will follow the
individual talks.
Russian Nomination of
Trieste Official Rejected
LAKE SUCCESS, N. Y., April 21
-(JP)-The United States and
Great Britain turned down Soviet
Russia's Swedish candidate for
governor of Trieste today on the
grounds that he lacked sufficient
experience to hold down that di-
plomatic hot-spot.

BEREAVED-A group of women huddle together for comfort at
the school football field in Texas City, Tex. where memorial serv-
ices were held to honor the victims of the blasts and fires.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN1

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 1021
AngellHall, by 3:00 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Sat-
urdays). '
TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1947
VOL. LVII, No. 138
Honors Convocation. The 24th
Annual Honors Convocation, 11
a.m., Fri.. April 25, Hill Auditor-
ium, will be addressed by Dr. Mar-
jorie Hope Nicolson, professor of
English at Columbia University.
Academic costume will be worn.
There will be no academic pro-
cession. Faculty members will
utilize the dressing rooms in the
rear of the Auditorium for robing
and proceed thence to their seats
on the stage. Reserved seats on
the main floor will be provided
for students receiving honors for
academic achievement, and for
their parents. To permit atend-
ance at the Convocation, classes
with the exception of clinics, will
be dismissed at 10:45 a.m. Doors
of the Auditorium will be open
at 10:30 a.m. The public is in-
vited.
Scho-ol of Business Administra-
tion: Faculty meeting, 4 p.m.,
Tues., April 22, Rm. 110, Tappan
Hall.
Forestry Assembly: 11 a.m..
Wed., April 23, Rackham Amphi-
theatre, Colonel William B. Gree-
ley, former Chief of the U.S. For-
est Service and now Chairman of
the Board of Directors of Ameri-
can Forest Products Industries,
will speak on recent progress and
prospects in private forestry. All
members of the School are ex-
pected to attend, and others inter-
ested are cordially invited.
All senior engineers who have
been invited to the Honor's Con-
vocation, and have paid their class
dues may receive their caps and
gowns April 22 and 23, 2-4 p.m.,
Garden Room, Michigan League.
Mliembership reports for all stu-
dent organizations are due in the
Office of Student Affairs, Rm. 2,
University Hall, April 23. Reports
are requested from all organiza-
tions, including honor societies.
forms may be secured in Rm. 2,
University Hall.
Veterans: In accordance with
the directive of the Deputy Ad-
ministrator for Veterans Affairs,
Veterans Administration Branch
Office No. 6, Columbus, Ohio, the
local Veterans Administration Of-
fice will conduct a survey of all
veterans in training at the Uni-
versity who have not received sub-
sistence allowance due them.

Veterans are urges to report to
Rm. 100, Rackham Bldg., for the
purpose of making this report on
April 22.
Cooperation of all veterans will
assist the Veterans Administration
Regional Office, Detroit, Michi-
gan, in reviewing delinquent sub-
sistence accounts.
Deadline for Veteran Book and
Supply Orders. May 3, 1947, has
been set as the final date for the
acceptance of veteran book and
supply orders at the bookstores.
All faculty members are requested
to anticipate material needed
through the end of the semester
and authorize same on or before
May 3. All back orders for mate-
rial not in stock at the bookstores
will be cancelled as of May 3.
To All Navy Students in Train-
ing under The Holloway Plan:
May 3, 1947, has been set as the
final date for the acceptance of
Navy book and supply requisi-
tions at the book stores. All fac-
ulty members are requested to an-
ticipate material needed through
the end of the semester and au-
thorize same on or before May 3.
All back orders for material not
in stock at the bookstores will be
canceled as of May 3.
The Naval Operating Base
School at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
has a number of teaching posi-
tions for women in the early ele-
mentary grades, Spanish, library
science, general science, mathe-
matics, home economics, manual
training, physical education, art
and music. Salaries are good, in-
cluding maintenance and trans-
portation from and to Miami, Fla.
Full information is available at
the Bureau of Appointments and
Occupational Information, 201
Mason Hall. Please observe the
new schedule in visiting the office
-Resident students on Tuesday,
Thursday, and Friday.
The Juneau Public Schools, Ju-
neau, Alaska, has vacancies in the
following fields for the year 1947-
1948: Superintendent, elementary,
music and art supervisor, history
and civics, secretary to the super-
intendent, athletic coach, band
(Continued on Page 3)
-
North Main Opposite Court House
--- Ends Tonight
BRINGING UP FATHER'
plus SILVER STALLION
News and Serial
- Starting Wednesday -
Gene Tierney in
SHANGHAI GESTURE
plus
FIGHTING FRONTIERSMAN

Campus
Briefs
Newcomb Talk ...
Prof. Theodore M. Newcomb, of
the psychology and sociology de-
partments, will speak on "Com-
mon Grounds of the Physical and
Social Sciences" at the meeting
of the Association of University
of Michigan Scientists at 8 p.m.
today in the East Conference
Room of the Rackham Building.
Faculty-Student Tea ...
A faculty-student tea honor-
ing members of the economics
department will be held from
3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday in
the Russian Tea Room of the
League.
The tea is sponsored by As-
,sembly and Pan-Hellenic Asso-
ciations.
* *~ * .
Hovanitz Lecture
The nature of genes and chrom-
osomes will be the subject of an
illustrated lecture by Prof. Will-
iam Hovanitz before an open
meeting of Phi Sigma, honorary
biological society, at 8 p.m. today
in Rackham Amphitheatre.
Prof. Hovanitz has done re-
search work on the finer struc-
ture of chromosomes with the aid
of the electron micrscope.
Song Recital . .
Virginia Zapf Person, music
%chool student, will present a
song recital at 8:30 p.m. today
at the Rackham Assembly Hall.
The program, which is open
to the public, will include selec-
tions by Mozart, Mahler, Boro-
din, Moussorgsky and Rach-
maninoff.
Education Movies . .
Modern industrial metal pro-
cessing will be the subject of two
movies to be presented by the
Bureau of Visual Education at
4:10 p.m. today in Rackham
Amphitheatre.
The films, ninth in the Bureau's
series of motion picture pro-
grams, will show die casting and
inside arc welding.
Ensian Meeting ...
A regular mieeting of the 'En-
sian business staff and tryouts
will be held at 4 p.m. today in
the Student Publications Build-
ing.
* * *
Lutheran Study .. .
The Lutheran Student Associa-
tion will hold a class in Church
History at 7:30 p.m. today at the
Student Center.
Lawyers' Guild ...
The scope of legislative investi-
gatory committees will be discuss-
ed at a panel discussion sponsored
by the University chapter of the
Lawyers' Guild at 4:10 p.m.
Thursday in the Union.
Alumni To Honor
State Legislators
University alumni who are
members of the State Legislature
will be guests at the annual ban-
quet of the University of Michi-
gan Club of Lansing today in
Lansing.
President Alexander G. Ruth-
ven will be the principal speaker.
Guests at the banquet will include
Mrs. Alexander G. Ruthven, Pro-
vost and Mrs. James P. Adams,
Vice-president and Mrs. Marvin
L. Niehuss, T. Hawley Tapping,
general secretary of the Alumni

Association, and Mrs. Tapping,
Waldo Abbott, Jr., field secretary
of the Alumni Association, and
Mrs. Abbott.

At no time in ancient Roman
Egypt was there anything corres-
ponding to serfdom as it existed in
WesternEurope, Prof. Allan Ches-
ter Johnson said yesterday in the
fourth talk of the Jerome lecture
series.
The Egyptian peasant had a
feudal relation to the overlord un-
der the Pharaohs, and a semi-
feudal one under the Ptolemys,
Prof. Johnson said. In the Roman
period the peasant preferred to
stay on the land as long as he
had any to cultivate, but was not
required by law to do so.
Not Developed
In the fourth century the large
estate had not yet developed in
Egypt, and ancient papyri give us
no information about serfdom in
the fourth and fifth centuries.
One document, a reply of peasants
to a "patron" who tried to take a
whole village under his wing, is
"certainly not in the tone of serfs
to their master," Prof. Johnson
said.
In the sixth century there were
two types of "coloni" or cultivat-
ors -of the soil, Prof. Johnson ex-
plained. Some peasants were
bound to the soil, their property
belonged to their master and they
never became free. The other
type wasaalsounder obligation
to cultivate the soil, but their
property was their own and they
For Real
Dancing Enjoyment
The Melody Men
Orchestra
Phil Savage Evenings 25-8484

TYPEW RITERS

'~1

JE ROME LECTURE:
European Brand of Serfdom
Unknown to Roman Egypt

AUTHORIZED
SALES & SERVICE
RIDER'S
115 West Liberty
Phone 8950

1.

became free in 30 years.
Neither of these types, Prof.
Johnson said, had anything in
common with the serf in Western
Europe.
The Jerome lecture series will
continue tomorrow with a talk on
"Taxation in the Byzantine Per-
iod," and be concluded Thursday
with a lecture on "Byzantine Ad-
ministration."
All lectures are given at 4:15
p.m. in the Rackham Amphithea-
tre.

r

For that
Delicious Midnight Snack
Try

I

Miller's Box Lunch
Golden Brown Chicken
or Fried Jumbo Shrimp
Home-made Rolls and Individual Pies
Call 27171
We Deliver Anywhere, Anytime

t

j

1

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B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
presents
"

t

11

MICHIGAN
Look who wanted to play in a Murder Picture!
BOB DOROTHY
HOPE LAMOUR
'.v /F'..

ENDING
WEDNESDAY

Sat., April 26, Ann Arbor High, 8:00 P.M.
Proceeds to Allied Jewish Appeal

,

- Cso --
Cartoon
News
p- Coming Thursday -
"ABlE'S
IRISH ROSE"

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Evenings and Sundays, 30c
Now Playing -
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with Ingrid Bergman
Cary Grant, Claude Raines
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with Jan Savitt and orchestra

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CORRECTION

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Specializing in FRIED CHICKEN DINNERS
Open 11:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. including Sundays.
5400 Plymouth Road (on the way to Detroit) Phone 937
HOME OF GOOD FOOD
Lunches 11:30-1:30 - only 65c
Dinners (family style)-5:00-8:00 P.M.-$1.45 to $1.65
418E. Washington (one-half block off State) Phone 9717
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Waffles our specialty . . Better Coffee
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OPENING
THURSDAY NIGHT
The Dept. of Speech presents
PLAY PRODUCTION

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8:15 PM.

COTTAGE INN
Specializing in Home Cooked Food. . . Steaks and Chops
Open Weekdays 11:00 A.M. - 1:30 P.M., 5:00-8:00 P.M.
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