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April 15, 1947 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-04-15

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4

P'AGE TWO

- S'HE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, APRIL 15, 1947

I

'THE BLOODY PULP':
.1
Peace Prize Rumored
For Garg April Issue,

.:,:

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

_

By PERRY LOGAN
'Rumors circulating about camp-
us yesterday that the Gargoyle,
a campus humor magazine whose
April issue goes on sale Friday,
would receive the Nobel Peace
Tourist Council
Will Conduct
Resort Survey
The first steps have been taken
by the Michigan Tourist Council
to have the University Bureau of
Business Research conduct a sur-
vey to determine the extent of
Mihigan's tourist and resort
business.,
Council members have already
conferred with Dean Russell A.
Stevenson of the School of Busi-
ness Administration, Prof. Edgar
.H. Gault, director of the Bureau
of Business Research and Robert
Cross, a member of the staff of
the Bureau of Business Research.
The tourist and resort industry
has been estimated at $400,000,000
a, year, which places it second only
to manufacturing in the state's
industrial field.
The Michigan Tourist Council
has received $250,000 a year for
the last two years from the State
Legislature to promote Michigan's
tourist and resort industry, and
one of the purposes of the survey
is to make the use of these funds
more effective.
A one-year study will be made,
but the complete survey will be
a long range project. The Coun-
cil plans to underwrite the cost
of the one-year study, but funds
for the over-all project must be
made available by the State Leg-
islature.

Prize for 1947 are not completely
unfounded, it was learned last
week via postal card from Stock-
holm.
The award, according to a
Stockholm source close to Oslo, is
to be made in virtue of Garg's
contribution this month to the
growing laxity of campus morale.
"The April issue is so virtuous
that there is some talk of its re-
placing women's dormitory regu-
lations," the report stated.
Headlined "The Bloody Pulp,"
the April Garg has consolidated
into handy 32-page form all the
pulpy literature the average stu-
dent finds time to read in any
one calendar month. It has been
singularly successful in its effort,
in that only one copy of the issue
has been printed. "We are de-
termined to sell out," staff mem-
ber Aaron Burr observed.
"Our aim has nothing to do
with foreign policy," McKinlay de-
clared, gargling pleasantly. "We
here are just struggling to bring
financial success to this unpre-'
tentious little publication that is
working so hard and so unflag-
gingly for greater world unity."
lAfter several flaming telegrams,
Henry Wallace finally refused to
comment.
Dr. F. H. Littell
Wins Award
Dr. 1ranklin H. Littell, director
of Lane -Hall, hasĀ° been awarded
the Frank S. Brewer Prize for
1946 by the American Society of
Church History for his essay en-
titled "The Anabaptist View of
the Church."
Given biennially by the Society,
the award is a cash grant of $500
toward publication of the manu-
script.
A specialist in the field of sec-
tarian Protestantism, Dr. Littell
is a member of the Editorial
Council of the new Mennonite
Encyclopedia, and is at present
translating and editing sources for
a volume, "The Left Wing of the
Reformation," to be published in
the Christian Classics Series of
the Nanking Theological Semi-
nary in China.
Dr. Littell is a- fellow of the
National Council on Religion in
Higher Education, and a member
of its Central Committee.

THOR JOANSON
FIREWORKS PLUS:

HARDIN VAN DEURSEN

High Voltage To Be Displayed
At Engineering Open House

11

For Real
Dancing Enjoyment
The Melody Men
Orchestra
Phil Savage Evenings 25-8084
Light Lunches
.. SOUPS
. SALADS
...SANDWICHES
COKES

l

There'll be plenty of fireworks
Friday in Room 247 of West En-
gineering Building when the elec-
trical engineering department cuts
loose its high voltage exhibition
for the Engineering Open House.
Catering to the desire of most
non-engineers to see electricity in
terms of blue sparks and vicious
crackling noises, Walter Bergner
and Tom Stout, co-chairman of
the department's Open House
committee, have planned a show
involving astronomical voltages.
These voltages, built up by a
NROTC Unit
Will Play Host
At Open House
Engineering Open House Friday
will be like a special springtime
Navy Day for the NROTC unit
here.
Capt. W. B. Michaux, USN, com-
manding officer of the unit, has
announced that all Navy facilities
on campus will be open to the pub-
lic, and over 200 NROTC students
as well as the Ship's Company of
the Unit will be in dress uniform
to play host to visitors.
Exhibitions at North Hall will
include a stereo-trainer of the
type used to train anti-aircraft
gunners during the war. This
trainer utilizes a movie sequence
of an attacking plane coordinated
with a mock gunfire control set-
up operated by the person being
trained. The machine is so regu-
lated that proper tracking of the
target and timing of fire will in-
dicate hits on the attacking planes.
Coffee and doughnuts will be
served to visitors in both the
basement coffee room and the
students' Wardroom in North
Hall, and a movie of Navy combat
action will be shown.
Exhibits in East Engineering
Building lobby will include a mag-
netic voice recorder and playback,
a device for training radio oper-
ators which transmits a series of
code signals, and a device called
an "automatic rater." This ap-
paratus looks and acts somewhat
like a pinball machine, but its
purpose is to administer achieve-
ment tests automatically by me-
chanically recording questions and
answers.
Johnsoni..
(Contnued from Page 1)
commute between New York and
Ann Arbor for the remaining re-
hearsals of the chorus.
Johnson has had previous ex-
perience with the University Mu-
sical Society, having been con-
ductor from 1939 until 1942, when
he entered military service. Dur-
ing the war he was at the head
of the Army Orchestra at Fort
Monmouth, New Jersey.
At the close of the war, John-
son was transferred to the Euro-
pean Army universities and di-
rected orchestras at Shrivenham,
England and Biarritz, France.
Following his discharge he became
head of the Julliard orchestra in
New York City, and more recently
was elected permanent conductor
of the Cincinnati Orchestra.
Hold Those War Bonds

Tesla coil for A.C. and a surge
generator for D.C., will be put to
the task of making bigger and
more vigorous sparks.
An audience participation angle
has been worked out in connec-
tion with the Tesla coil hook-
up. Any visitor whonwishes may
put a tin-foil cap on one of his
fingers, point it at the electrode
atop the coil and be exhilarated
by having a fat blue spark jump
about two feet to his finger. The
fact that the current is alternat-
ing with extreme rapidity will
keep the electrical charge on the
skin of the experimenter, so he
need fear no harmful aftereffects
from this exposure to several mil-
lion volts.
Bergner and Stout, in charge of
all electrical displays for the Open
House, have indicated that they
need volunteers to assist in oper-
ating the displays.
Giving assurance that no such
volunteers would run risk of elec-
trocution, Bergner stated, "It isn't
necessary for them to know any-
thing about electricity. As long
as they're interested, we'll show
them what to do."
C"am pus
Briefs
Chess Tournament . ..
Chess players from the Inter-
national Center will face a team
from Lloyd House in a tournament
at 7:30 p.m. today in the Inter-
national Center.
Water-Safety Class . .
The Red Cross water-safety
instruction class will start at
7:30 p.m. tomorrow in the In-
tramural Building.
Students must be at least 19
years of age and have complet-
ed a senior life-saving course.
Jail Life Talk.. .
"Life in the County Jail" will be
the subject of an address to be
given by Deputy Sheriff Harold
Swoverland at 8 p.m. Wednesday
in the Rackham Amphitheatre be-
fore a meeting of the Washtenaw
Historical Society.
IRA Round-Table ...
The Detroit round table of
the National Conference of
Christians and Jews will dis-
cuss "Brotherhood Patterns the
Peace" at 7:30 p.m. Thursday
in the League under the spon-
sorship of the Inter-Racial As-
sociation.
Labor Discussion.. .
Prof. William Haber of the eco-
nomics department will discuss
the bearing of current legislation
on labor relations at a meeting
of Americans for Democratic Ac-
tion at 8:30 p.m. Thursday in the
Union.
A business meeting for all mem-
bers will be held at 7:30 p.m. pre-
ceding the talk.
Speech Contest.. ..
A meeting of all eligible second
semester freshmen interested in
entering the freshman speech con-
test will be held at 5 p.m. Friday
in Rm. 4203 Angell Hall.

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the" Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 1021
Angell Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Sat-
urdays).
TUESDAY, APRIL 15, 1947
VOL. LVI, No. 132
N otices
Group Hospitalization and Sur-
gical Service: During the period
from April 5 through April 15, the
University Business Office, (Room
9, University Hall) will accept new
applications as well 4s requests for
changes in contracts now in ef-
fect. These new applications and
changes become effective June 5,
with the first payroll deduction
on May 31. After April 15, no
new applications or changes can
be accepted until October, 1947.
Students in the College of Engi-
neering are excused from classes
in this college on April 18 in order
that they may assist in conduct-
ing the Engineering Open House.
Classes will be held on Saturday
as usual.
Executive Committee qf the
College of Engineering
Veteran Students in the Schools
of Medicine and Dentistry are
urged to consult the bulletin
boards in their respective schools.
All men whose names appear on
the list posted must report to the
Cashier's Office, Veterans Section,
302 South Wing, immediately.
Veterans: This is to notify all
veterans receiving benefits under
P.L. 346 that during the period
between April 15 and April 19 they
will have the opportunity to make
corrections or changes in the leave
applications filed at the time of
registration.
All veterans who are included
in any one of the following groups
must report to the V.A. Guidance
Center, Rm. 100A Rackham Bldg.,
if they are to avoid the interrup-
tion of subsistence payments.
1. Those who are planning to
re-enroll for the Summer Ses-
sion;
2. Those who are not planning
to re-enroll for the Summer Ses-
sion, but will desire leave; and
3. Those who desire their June
check (normally mailed on July
1st) sent to a different address.
Seniors and Graduate Students
who have received invitations to
the Honors Convocation on April
25 are notified that orders for
caps and gowns must be received
by the Moe Sport Shop no later
than today.
School of Business Administra-
tion. Applications for admission to
summer session or fall semester
should be submitted as soon as
possible. Application forms are
available at Rm. 108, Tappan Hall.

The Central Office of the Vet-
erans Administration has estab-
lished the following policy rela-
tive to granting leave following
completion of a course of train-
ing:
a. A veteran may be granted3
leave c absence only while pur-
suing a course of training. He,
therefore, will not be granted
leave following the completion of
his course, even though he has
made a request for said leave while
still in training and has remain-
ing entitlements.
b. Unused accumulated leave to
a veteran's credit upon completion
of course will be credited to his
leave account for use in any sub-
sequent course.
This will answer questions rais-
ed as to whether a veteran is en-
titled to leave subsequent to grad
uation from a college or univer-
sity.
Petitions for admission to the
Combined Curriculum in Ltters
and Law are again being accepted
from out-of-state students. Pro-
spective applicants who havetbe-
gun the first semester of their
junior year may apply foradmis-
sion to the program provided pe-
titions are filed with the Chair-
man of the Committee, 1220 An-
gell Hall, not later than April 19.
1947. Prospective applicants are
referred to a description of the
curriculum on pages 38-39 of the
current Announcement of the Col-
lege of Literature, Science and.
the Arts.
Deadline for Veteran Book and
Supply Orders. May 3,, 1947, has
been set as the final date for the
acceptance of veteran book and
supply orders at the bookstores.
All faculty members are requested
to anticipate material needed
through the end of the semester
and authorize same on or before
May 3. All back orders for mate-
rial not in stock at the bookstores
will be cancelled as of May 3.
To the presidents of all campus
undergraduate organizations. You
are requested to call at the Office
of Student Affairs Rm. 2, Univer-
sity Hall, to secure forms for re-
porting the membership of your
organization for the current se-
mester. These reports are due on
or before April 23.
The U.S. Civil Service Commis-
sion announces examination for
Laboratory Mechanic, Accounting
and Auditing Assistant, Geologist,
and Medical Officer.
The Board of U.S. Civil Service
Examiners for the Securities and
Exchange Commission announces
an examination for probational
appointment to the position of
Securities Investigator in the Se-
curities Exchange Commission.
The State of Michigan Civil
Service Commission announces ex-
amination for Forester I.
The City of Detroit Civil Serv-
ice Commission announces ex-
amination for Junior Accountant,
Semi-Senior Accountant, and Sen-

ior Accountant, and for Junior and
Intermediate Governme!nt Analyst.
The U.S. Department of Agri-
culture, Bureau of Entymology and
Plant Quarantine, have openings
for summer employment in For-
estry in the state of California.
For further information call at
the Bureau of Appointments, Rm.
201, Mason Hall.
Aeronautical and Mechanical
Seniors and Graduates: Two rep-
resentatives of the Chance Vought
Aircraft Company, Stratford, Con-
necticut, will interview on Monday
and Tuesday, April 28 and 29. In-
terested students may sign sched-
ule on Aeronautical Bulletin
Board.
Mechanical, Civil, Electrical and
Aeronautical Engineers and Phy-
sicists. Mr. Bouton, representing
McDonnell Aircraft Corp., will in-
terview mechanical, civil, electri-
cal and aeronautical engineers and
physicists graduating in June and
August and graduate students on
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday,
April 21, 22, and 23. For interview,
sign schedule on Aeronautical En-
gineering Bulletin Board.
Senior Civil Engineers. Mr.
Blair, assistant chief engineer, At-
chison Topeka & Santa Fe Rail-
road will interview interested stu-
dents relative to employment, on
Monday, April 21. Sign appoint-
ment slip in Rm. 1215 East Engi-
neering Bldg., any afternoon.
University Community Center,
1045,Midway,
Willow Run Village.
Tues., April 15, 7:30 p.m., Smith
Electric Co., will discuss immer-
Norte Main Opposite Court House
- Ends Tonight -
SUNSET PASS
plus
THE TRAP
with Sidney Toler
News and Serial No. 5
Starts Wednesday -
THE 13th HOUR
plus
BORDERLAND

slion water heaters with any in-
terested Village residents; 8 p.m.,
Wives' Club Meeting. Representa-
tives from Ann Arbor Garden
Club and FPHA Landscape Spec-
ialist will discuss plans for plant-
ing flowers in the Village. All in-
terested Villagers are invited.
Wed.. April 16, 8 p.m., Opening
number of the Spring Program.
Aarre K. Lahti, "Decorating Your
Home."
Thurs., April 17. 8 p.m. Art-
(Continued on Page 4)
MICHIGAN
Ending Wednesday
Yoti//Get Sring
Fever iOver Again!
{{
PAULETTE
GODDARD
Fred MACMURRAY n
IWIs
MACDONALD
CAREY
ARLEEN
WHELAN
also
MARCH OF TIME
Cartoon and News

4

_
- I

T flew Sipmeni
IMPORTED SILK by the yard
CARVED WOOD from Africa, India,
and China
PORCELAIN VASES and RICE BOWLS
INDIAN BRASSWARE and JEWELRY
ACROSS FROM THE ARCADE - 330 MAYNARD

i

xi

i

# . M ". .

JillI

I

P

!: + - -

+ Classified Advertising

+

For that
Delicious Midnight Snack
Trey
ller's Box Lunch
Golden Brown Chicken
or Fried Jumbo Shrimp
Homae-made Rolls and Individual Pies
Call 27171
We Deliver Anywhere, Anytime

I

Starts: 2:03 - 6:00 - 9:30
CO-FEATURE
ORUG - CAL.DW-L

8:00 AM.-10:30 P.M.
Weekdays
8:00 A.M.-12:30 P.M.
Friday-Saturday
Clark's Tea Room
217 Observatory

,

--. -

r

WANTED TO'RENT
STUDENT COUPLE desires apartment
starting August. Long-term residence.
Wife teaches, no children or pets. Box
23, Michigan Daily.)5
WANTED TO RENT-A house or large
apartment for summer months of
June, July, August, also September, if
possible. Will pay full rent in ad-
vance. Box 25, Mich. Daily. )17
SINGLE business man desires studio
room or suite with outside entrance.
Preferably ground floor or basement.
South or east side campus. Perma-
nent, references. Phone 2-7412. )12
WANTED
WANTED - Motor Bike with Whizzer
motor. Call 2-6037. )2
WANTED-Two waiters for fraternity
dining room four blocks from cam-
pus. Call Treasurer 4707. )11
SALESMAN to represent York Refrig-
eration and Air Conditioning Distrib-
utor in Washtenaw County. Salary
and commission. Write box 20. )16
MISCELLANEOUS
WOULD like to start club' for tall peo-
ple. Those interested write H. Brazee,
Post Office Box 201, Ann Arbor. )15
'The Play's the Thing," but if the
thing don't play, give us a ring, and
we'll fix it today. Phone 9241 or
bring your radio to the Tavern Cafe-
teria for expert radio repair service.)19
LOST AND FOUND
LOST. - Pair Harlequin-Style Glasses
April 3. Probably near Rackham Bldg.
Owner blind without them. 2-4471,1
3533 Stockwell.1

LOST-K&E Slide Rule. Gentleman who
found slide rule bearing the name B.
M. Mehta and who telephoned 816
Packard about the same, kindly con-
tact East Engineering Office or write
to S. S. Mehta, 615 Monroe. )7
FOR SALE
ROSE Club Chair. Recently rebuilt and
upholstered. $55. Apt. 4, 412 Foun-
tain. )4
FOR SALE-English riding boots. Size
8D. Used only twice. Rudy Sweder,
212 Winchell, 2-4401. )9
A BETTER PRICE paid for Men's used
clothing. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. )14
FOR SALE-Remington portable .type-
writer, Deluxe No. 5, new last Novem-
ber. Used very little. Box 119 Michi-
gan Daily. )3
GOLFERS-Your golf clubs are here.
Take your pick. Hagen, Spalding and
Wilson, all prices. Municipal Golf
ourse. 9230. )13
ARGUS C-3, 35 mm. like new. Coated
f35 - 1 16, 1/10 - 1/300. Built-in flash,
rangefinder, case, 27' feet Ansco 35
mm. $65.00. Write Box 4, Michigan
Daily. )8
ATTENTION, GOLFERS-Let me help
you select your golfing needs. Com-
plete lines of all top-grade clubs,
bags, balls. Phone 2-2058 or 4044.
Johnny Malloy, Golf Professional. )18
NEW TYPEWRITER, L. C. Smith. Silent
Portable. $95.00., 3-section folding,
screen, unpainted $7.00; child's play
pen, new pad $6.50; radio, Stewart-
Warner table model $14.00. Robert H.
Eaton, 4016 Washtenaw Rd., Apt. 4 )6

I

THE FARM CUPBOARD
Specializing in FRIED CHICKEN DINNERS
Open 11:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. including Sundays.
5400 Plymouth Road (on the way to Detroit) Phone 9387
HOME OF GOOD FOOD
Lunches 11:30-1:30 - only 65c
Dinners (family style)-5:00-8:00 P.M.-$1.45 to $1.65
418 E. Washington (one-half block off State) Phone 9717
THE MAYFLOWER
BREAKFASTS... LUNCHEONS ... DINNERS
Waffles our specialty . . . Better Coffee
307 South Main Street
COTTAGE INN
Specializing in Home Cooked Food . .. Steaks and Chops
Open Weekdays 11:00 A.M. - 1:30 P.M., 5:00 - 8:00 P.M.
Sundays 11:00 A.M. - 2:00 P.M., 5:00 - 9:00 P.M.
r4 Ir . - .- - . ,II- -__

T THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECHI

presents
PLAY PRODUCTION
in
"ISAINT
JOAN"

The SPIRIT of SPRING
is many things. . .
s That (juep serge of well-being when

III

I

W ,L I

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