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April 04, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

___TuEMICHIGANDAILY

- - FRDAY, APRIL 4, i§47

W,.,. ..., .... ;; ,. , .. _ , ... _._._ _.,.

[RUSES VIEWED:
Electron Display To Be
Featured At Open House

By ROBERT BALL.
These days it's important to
:now what molecules and elec-
rons are doing.
Two devices that have told sci-
ntists a good deal about the pri-
ate lives of those tiny particles
oe the electron miscroscope and
Chem Exhibit
[ii Open House
Engineers Will Make
Plastics For Visitors
Use of chemistry in industry
ill be the natural pivot of the
hemical engineering department's
xhibits for the Engineering Open
louse April 18.
Kingpin display will be a full
ize ethyl alcohol distillation col-
mn, which will be in operation
eparating alcohol from a mixture
f alcohol and water. Unfortu-
lately for any visitors who might
lesire samples, the end product,
bout 196 proof, will be pumped
ack into the water and run
,hrough continuously.
The department's plastics lab-
ratory will turn out samples for
lie visitors. Manufacture of both
hot" plastics, which are poured
n a mold and heated, and "cold"
>astics, which are pressed into
hape, will be demonstrated.
Anyone planning to start a sul-
huric acid plant or a gasoline
efinery will be able to find out
LovI to do it by studying the dis-
>lays in the plant and equipment
Design group. All the steps in
:onstructing the lay-out and all
he fine points of design and plac-
ng of machinery will be shown by
Irawings and models.
North Main Opposite Court House
LIT'LE MEN" &
"Durango Valley Raiders"
Starts Saturday
Roy Rogers in
"HELLDORADO"
Plus Tom Neal in
"MY DOG SHEP"
"JUNGLE GIRL"
Chapter No. 4
RKO World News

the Wilson cloud chamber. Both
of these will be on display April
18 in East Physics Building as part
of the physics department's ex-
hibit for the Engineering Open
House.
The department has two of the
microscopes, which look just about
as complicated and formidable as
a layman would expect. Anything
down to a size of a five-millionth
of an inch is fair game for the
apparatus. This remarkable range
brings such formerly invisible
units as viruses and molecules
into view.
Done with Electrons
It's done with electrons and a
flourescent screen. A stream of
electrons traveling at high speed
passes through the specimen. The
electron beam is then megnetically
focused to throw the image of the
specimen on I h e flourescent
screen.
Not content with forcing mole-
cules to "sit for their pictures,"
Prof. R. C. Williams and Dr. Wy-
coff of the physics department
figured out a way to get three-
dimensional photos with the mi-
croscope. By putting a film of
metal on the molecule--no small
accomplishment - the electron
stream can be retarded in such a
way as to give shadow patterns on
the screen. Analysis of these shad-
ows gives accurate data on the
thickness of the specimen.
Electron Behavior
An electron, of course, is much
smaller than a molecule, but that
doesn't mean that it's safe from
investigation. The Wilson cloud
chamber, while not presenting a
picture of the electron, does show
vhat it's doing.
The chamber of the apparatus
is filled with a saturated vapor.
The electron is allowed to enter
the chamber under carefully con-
trolled magnetic conditions. As it
flashe's through the chamber it
ionizes particles of the vapor,
Wives.:.
(Continued from Page 1)
literature. She has found Ameri-
cans very friendly to foreigners,
and admires American women for
their ability to do many things in
addition to being good housekeep-
ers.
University education in France'
is based on ability rather than
time spent in the classroom, Mrs.
Yager said. If a student is able
'to pass the necessary examina-
tions, he may receive a degree
without spending four years. in
residence at a university.

Faculty Asked
To Aid Hayden
Library Fu 'nd
'' of Philippine To
Benefit by Dionations
Faculty members may contrib-
ute books from April 7 to 12 for
the Joseph Ralston Hayden Me-
morial Library to be established
at the University of Philippines.
Almost all types of books ap-
plicable to a modern university
curriculum are needed. Scientific,
medical and other works, however,
which tend to become outdated
quickly must be of reasonably re-
cent publication. Such books is-
sued prior to 1.920 are not likely
to be useful today. Possibly the
best criteria will be the donor's
own judgment of what he believes
a modern college library can use.
Anyone having books to donate
may bring them to the General Li-
brary or to any branch library, or
if the number of books is large
they may call the General Library
and arrange to have it collect the
books. The names of all contribu-
tors will be compiled in a volume
to be placed in the Hayden Memo-
rial Library; for this reason it is
important that everyone contrib-
uting books give their names.
Approximately 25,000 books have
already been sent to the Univer-
sity of the Philippines from the
General Library. These included
many duplicates the library has
had on hand and also a large pro-
portion of University Press pub-
lications.
A substantial number of the
books already sent were at one
time part of Professor Hayden's
personal library and have now
been contributed by his family as
a memorial collection.
May Atttnd ance
Upon presentation of identi-
fication, University students and
their dates may attend without
charge the alumni dance to be
held by the University of Michigan
Club of Rochester, N. Y., at 9 p.m.
April 11 at the Brooklea Country
Club.
A nthropo logy Trip
Prof. James B. Griffin, anthrop-
ology museum director, and a
party of six students will leave to-
morrow for excavation work in two
pre-historic village sites in Cal-
houn County, I1.
In mid Nineteenth Century
New York the city council was
served oysters and coffee at city
expense during its meetings.

Frost Enjoys ROMAN EMPIRE:
'C I I S I1ke Priiceton Pro
Big Selbool' Jerome Histo
sta° Ve trans Not The second series of Thomas
ad a e od Spencer Jerome lectures, i
will be Given by Prof. Allan Chester
{tf0t..~l2.:.,,: . I ~ ) Johnson of Princeton university
on"the eneral subject of Egypt
gnd the Roman Empire, will begin
ghen's but~ sm nt hn e else inTuesday after vacation and con-
hi er snY al w ay s inn e thro u gh A pril 24.
Ho did remmbr' one nature tProf. Johnsonany atihority in
t.pem hwv, , tha' t wroe xx'en the field of papyrii and ancient
pe li wever i hAn Arbor history, was chosen by the officers
of the American Academy in Rome
"I iivel (it on Pontiac Road and the Board of Regents of the
t ' he iaid. "'Oie night I sat Univesi>ty to deliver the lecture
atone Ky my~ ropen fireplace and el e.
w't J m e 'Spring Pore.s It was a-
r.mem: er t clearl , lthogh ablished in accordance with the
I do't einenx~'rthewri lu (4provisions of the will ofG-te late
mdnof rmyomer he tn g f Mr. Jerome, who was the son of a
man!t fmy the p!ms former governor of Michigan and
,hen speaking of poetry in gen- graduated from the University
eral, Frost said that sheer emo- in the class of 1884. The will pro-
tion dosn't explain it : "All this ?vided for lectures to be delivered

crued. at the University and at the
Americani Academy in Rome on
somepailseofancient civilization.
The first lecturer was Prof. John
G. Winter of the Department of
Classical Studies, who gave a ser-
ies of lectures at the Academy in
1929 and at the University in the
autumn of 1930.
All of the Jerome lectures will
be held at 4:15 p.m. in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre. The specific
dates and topics follow.
April 15. Fiduciary Currency and
its Problems; April 16, Inflation;
April 18. Systems of Land Tenure;
April 21. Sc4fdom April 23, Tax-
ation in the Byzantine Period:
and April 24, Byzantine Adminis-
tration.
Hold Those War Bonds

fessor To Give
rical Lectures

&

4

MINE INSPECTION TRIP - Members of the fact-finding board
get ready to descend into the Centralia Coal Company's No. 5
nine at Centralia, Ill., for a first hand inspection of the pit where
111 miners perished in an explosion March 25. Visible, left to
right, are; James Sneddon, State Mine Inspector; Fred Halhmeyer,
mine electrician; Wilbert Hohl, State's Attorney; a reporter;
William Gallagher, Bureau of Mines; and John Jones, Coal Mines
Administration.
DeanLloyd Explains Postion
- --- - -- - - --- -- -b- - --Ao
OfResponsibilityHeld b(Ce
4 _

(Continued from Page 1)
sibility for what goes on in a fra-
ternity house lies with the fra-
ternity. The fraternity members
Baud To' PIr
At Music Mfeeting
Approximately 105 members of
the University Concert Band will
leave Ann Arbor at 9 p.m., April
12 for Indianapolis, Ind.
The band will present a special
concert at 8:30 p.m. April 13 in
Caleb Mills Hall, Shortridge High
School, Indianapolis, for music
instructors and band directors at-
tending the North Central Music
Educators Conference. Members
of the Michigan group will have
an opportunity to hear discussions
and participate in activties of the
conference.
High school and college students
in the vicinity of Indianapolis will
attend a special rehearsal of the
band in the afternoon.

invite their guests or in some other
way let them know that they are
welcome. But undeniably the
guests are accessories and there-
fore have their full responsibility
too. In a recent case when a fra-
ternity was disciplined and seven
members paid a fine, it would
have been excellent if the seven
guests had come forward volun-
tarily and paid the fine also. A
sense of fair play and a sense of
honor are more important than
rules or penalties and produce
what everyone wants to have--
self-respect.
"I want every woman on this
campus to have all its rights and
privileges, and by the same token
I want her to assume the full
measure of her responsibility. No
man will report her, nor should
he be asked to, but she herself
should see that she shares with
her friends any consequences of
mistakes or infractions of rules in
which both are involved. Only so
can there be true equality and mu-
tual respect."

rollinlg a'round on the loor and
kicking a d s r1aming, is1't
poeiry. It must be controlled
eltiOln mutst 1 e 6n e sd0 to a
wit -mull andi tutrnedl out Ocaeully'"
Noxv on h is way home. Frost
has just retuineii from San Fran-
cisco andi r'ii Lhe. !niversity of
California wher h~ ole was given a
degree. ''TIat.gli to round
them olf,'" he said.
lie will have a new volume.
"t(l. Bush'hi published in May,I
ht' said. In the next fewv months
ie hOpes to pendl some time on
his farm in N w Elnglandc, whore
he says he can aiik across the
fields. "stepping from stone to
stogyol.',
Ch reiesHold.
r e
(Continuted fron Pape 1)
ist, Congregational, Presbyterian,
Baptist, Memorial Christian and
Bethlehem Evangelical and Re-
formed Churches.
Tre Ore services will be held at
St. Mary's Catholic Students'
Chapel from noon to 3 p.m.
Mass of the Presanctified will
be offered at 12:10 l).m. The time
between 1:30 and 3 p.m. will be de-
voted to prayers and sermons on
"The Seven Last Words," deliv-
2red by Rev. Fr. Prank J. McPhil-
lips and Rev. Fr. John Bradley.
Stations of the Cross will be
made at 7:30 p.m. at the Chapel.
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church
will have worship and meditations
on "The Seven Last Words" from
noon to :, p.m.
The meditations will be led by
Rev. John Burt and Rev. John M.
Sliteclt.
Althiough the Lutheran Student
Chapel will hold no services today,
Lutheran students may attend
services at any of the local Lu-
theran churches.
Rev. C. A. Brauer will speak on
"The Fourth Word from the
Cross" at the service to begin at
1 p.m. at St. Paul's Lutheran
Church.
Mrs. Oscar Haab will be the
soloist.
Trinity Lutheran Church will
divide its three-hour service into
seven periods of 25 minutes each.
Rev. Walter M. Brandt will lead
the meditations on "The Seven
Last Words."
The Senior Choir will furnish
the music and Rev. E. C. Stell-
horn will speak on "Himself He
Cannot Save" at services at 1:30
p.m. at the Zion Lutheran Church.
- - --I -

Light Lunches
... soups
..SALADS
. SANDWICHES
COKES
8:00 A.M.-10;30 P.M.
Weekdays
8:0Q A.M.-12:30 P.M.
Friday-Saturday
Clark's Tea Room
217 Observatory

from time to time, as funds ac-

COLLEGE
A School of Business-Preferrid b
College Men and Women

y

4 MONTH
INTENSIVE COURSE
SECRETARIAL TRAINING FOR dCLEGE
ASTUDENTS AND GRADUATES
A thorough, intensiecourse-starting
Jutnc. October, February. 1Bul-
lrhtin A oil rckjue,t
SPECIAL COUNSELOR for G.I. TRAINING
Regular Day and lEvening Schools
Throughout the Year. Catalog
4Presidenit, J<)hn Robert Gr'egg, S.C.D.
D~irectorI'Paul M.PaY, M.A.
THE GREGG COLLEGE
Dept. NW, 6 N. Michigan Ave., Chicag 2

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ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
DIVISION AT CAT7HERINE'
I2-3 P.M ...,T.HE THREE-HOUR SERVICE
Vie O'nblie Is Cordinlly Invited

r.
{

A

N

wIChIGAN
-- Now Showing-

f

t

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

at the

"rOOD sign

I

My favorite suit's
been cleaned by
THE EMO DERN
METHOD!~g
#'s the finest in scientific,. ODOR-
LESS dry cleaning! SEE the difference
--FEEL the difference. . . . You'll
KNOW the difference!
CLEAN E RS
630 S. Ashley Phone 4700

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent lit
typewritten form to the office of1'the
Assistant to the President, Room 1021
Angell Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Sat-
urdays).
FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 194'7
VOL, LVI, No. 131
Notices
Automobile Regulation, Spring
Vacation: The University Auto-
mobile Regulation will be lifted
from 12 noon, Fri., April 4, until
8:00 a.m., Mon., April 14.
Seniors and Graduate Students
who have received invitations to
the Honors Convocation on April
25 are notified that orders for
caps and gowns must be received
by the Moe Sport Shop no later
than April 15.
Graduate Students: All courses
dropped after Friday, April 4, will
be recorded with a grade of E.
Faculty, College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts:
Midsemester reports are due not
later than Friday, April 4.
Report cards are being distrib-
uted to all departmental offices.
Green cards are being provided
for freshmen and sophomores and
white cards for reporting juniors
and seniors. Reports of freshmen
and sophomores should be sent to
108 Mason Hall; those of juniors
and seniors to 1220 Angell Hall.
Midsemester r e p o r ts should
name those students, freshmen
and upperclassmen, whose stand-I
ing at midsemester is "D" or "E."
not merely those who receive "D"

or "" in so-called midsemester
examinations.
Students electing our courses,
but registered in other schools or
colleges of the University should
be reported to the school or col-
lege in which they are registered.
Additional cards may be had at
108 Mason hall or 1220 Angell
Hall.
Ann Arbor Conference on IHos-
pital Planning under the auspices
of the College of Architecture and
Design will hold sessions from
Thursday evening, April 3,
through Saturday afternoon, April
5. Thursday and Friday evening
meetings will be held at the Mich-
igan Union at 8:00 p.m. On Fri-
day, meetings will be at 10:00 a.m.
and 2:00 p.m. in the Library,
Architecture Building, and on
Saturday at 9:30 a.m. and 2:00
p.m. in Room 102, Architecture
Building. All persons profession-
ally interested in hospital plan-
ning are invited to attend any of
the sessions.
Library Hours During Spring Re-
cess:
Prom Friday, April 4 through
Saturday, April 12 the General Li-
brary will be open week-days from
8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Study Halls with-
in the building and Angell Hall
Study Hall will be open from 10
a.in. to 12 noon, and from 2 to 4
p.m. Gi'aduate Reading Rooms
will be open from 9 a.m. to 12 noon

and from 1
no Sunday
13.

to 5 p.m. There will be
service on April 6 and

In general, Divisional Libraries
will be open on short schedules,
i.e. 10-12 and 2-4 daily.
Exceptions are: the East and
West Engineering Libraries, which
will be open from 9-12 and 2-5
daily except Saturday, when they
will be closed in the afternoon;
the Physics Library, open 9-12
daily, closed afternoons; the West
Lodge Study Hall at Willow Run,
which will be closed.
In the event there is a telephone
strike on Monday, April 7, 1947,
the University switchboard will
operate to handle only emergency
calls, both local and long distance.
All users of University telephone
facilities are urged to avoid mak-
ing any unnecessary calls in the
event the strike develops
R. P. Briggs
Women students referred to
specific housemothers for supple-
mentary housing by the Office of
the Dean of Women for the fall
semester, 1947, are reminded that
(Continued on Page 4)
For Real
Dancing Enjoyment
The Melody Men
Orchestra
Phil Savage Evenings 25-8084

Special Student Breakfasts
7:00-- 11:00 A.M.
GOOD FRIDAY
CLOSED FROM 1-3 P.M.
TODAY'S LUNCHEON SPECIALS
Lake Trout
Tuna Fish Salad Special
DAli
328 East Liberty Street

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Also
CARTOON - SPORT
NEWS

I

OVR~ PR!CL
Weekdays until : P.M., 25c
Evenings and Sundays, 30c
Today and Saturday
GALLANT JOURJ~NEY
wit Glenn Ford-Janet Blair
--and--
TGS ON ' l WILD
x\i.![ii. in iniIn Jr.
C oinizng Sunday
TH'IE JOLSON STORY

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TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Sold, Rented Repaired
STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177.

I

THE FARM CUPBOARD
Specializing in FRIED CHICKEN DINNERS
Olien 11:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. including Sundays.
5400 Plymouth Road (on the way to Detroit) Phone 9387
HOME OF GOOD FOOD
Lunches 11:30-1:30 - only 65c
Dininers (family style)-5:00-8:OO P.M.-$1.45 to $1.65
418 E. Washington (one-half block off State) Phone 9717
THE MAYFLOWE
BREAKFASTS . . . LUNCHEONS ... DINNERS
Waffles our specialty . . . Better Coffee
307 South Main Street

Continuous
Daily
from 1 P.M.

.WA kI .4'

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77
STARiNG
EDDIE ALBERT

For that
Delicious Midnight Snack
T*n

I1

COTTAGE INN
Specializing in Home Cooked Food.. . Steaks and Chaps
Open Weekdays 11:00 A.M. - 1:30 P.M., 5:00 - 8:00 P.M.-
Sundays 11:00 A.M.. -2:00 P.M., 5:00 - 9:00 P.M.
Closed Saturdays 512 East Wililam

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