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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 28, 1947 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIX -TntE MicHiUAM flxny ___

IRST SINCE WAR :
'U' Filipino Students Stress
Necessity for Hayden Library

The proposed Hayden Memorial
Library at the University of the
Philippines will be the first real
library Filipino students have had
since the war, according to Dr.
Main Library
clxets German
Science Books,
Scientific journals from Ger-
many which the General Library's
agent in that country has been
accumulating during the war years
are beginning to arrive in large
quantities, according to W. G.
Rice, director.
The war made it impossible for
the Library to obtain these
volumes in their original form,
though some substitutes were
available in microfilmed or litho-
graphed copies reproduced from
the few issues reaching this coun-
try from Germany.
The firm which has served as
the University's agent operated
in Leipsig prior to the war. Allied
bombing missions, however, forced
the removal of its stocks to safer
country in eastern Germany. Wirh
the peace settlement and subse-
quent division of Germany among
the Four Powers, the agency f:und
itself deep in the Russian Zone.
This new development gave the
Library the added task of secur-
ing the books from Russia.
The problem was taken care of
by the Library of Congress which
made settlement with the Rus-
sians through the U. S. Army. The
first consignment reached the Un-
iversity this winter and the Lib-
rary has just received notice that
a second will arrive soon.
Journals published up to 1942
and dealing with recent scientific
and technological research con-
ducted in Germany will provide
the bulk of the latest shipment
These works will be especially
valuable to students in the pure
sciences, in medicine, and in engi-
neering fields at the University
Rice said.
FINE
ORIENTAL
RUGS
25%
on all pieces
Room Size and Scatters,
Runners, Mats
in all sizes
No luxry /ax
N. L. MANGOUNI
334 South Fourth Avenue
Phone 6878

Augusto A. Camara, Filipino grad-
uate student here.
Dr. Camara, who heads the Fili-
pino student group on campus.
came to Ann Arbor a year ago. At
that time the University of the
Philippines had just opened and
was carrying on under extremely
adverse conditions, he said.
Books Destroyed,
Millions of books were destroyed
during the Japanese occupation
when troops billeted in University
buildings used them for making
fires, Dr. Camara said, adding
that the few books which were re-
moved to Manila were later de-
E stroyed by Allied artillery in the
I battle for the liberation of the
city.
The proposed library, to be par-
tially financed by University of
Michigan students, will therefore
render untold aid to Filipino stu-
dents," Dr. Camara said.
Lucila Martelino, Filipino stu-
dent who came to Ann Arbor 18
months ago, also emphasized the
Iplight of students on the islands
F because of the book shortage.
"Letters from my friends at home
say that they are trying to make
the best of limited facilities," she
explained.
'"Books are badly needed and the
proposed Hayden Library will go
a long way toward filling that
need," Miss Martelino said.
Campus Drive
The campus drive for the Hay-
den Memorial Library will get
underway on April 14. Included
in the drive will be a student tal-
ent show at Hill Auditorium, a
dance at Waterman gym and a
pledge subscription campaign.
According to Russ Mullen, who
heads the subscription division of
the drive, all campus residences
and organizations will be con-
tacted by speakers who will ex-
plain details of the drive. Tables
will be set up on campus so that
students can make contributions.
World Student Service Fund
members on campus are working
- in conjunction with the student
committee on the drive. WSSF
members will aid in the subscrip-
tion drive to be carried on during
the campaign.
Mrs. Thompson, Camp
Davis Caretaker, Dies
Mrs. Grant Thompson, wife of
the caretaker of Camp Davis, the
University's geology and survey-
ing camp at Jackson, Wyo., died
last Friday.
The Thompsons have looked
after the camp since 1931, acting
as cooks in the summer, when
students occupy the camp.

'U' Debaters
Will Oppose
Maine Team
Group ToDefend Role
Of Labor in Industry
University debators will defend
the proposition "That Labor Be
Given a Direct Share in the Man-
agement of Industry" against the
University of Maine Debate Team
at 11 a.m. in Kellogg Auditorium,
today.
Shift of opinion ballots which
the audience will be asked to fill
out will tabulate the audience's
attitude toward the question both
before and after the debate.
William Flaskamp and William
Starr, who will take the affirma-
tive for Michigan, are members
of the University Debate Team
which is coached by Donald Kleck-
ner of the speech department.
Following the "Michigan Style"
of debate, each participant will
have an opportunity not only to
speak but to cross examine his op-
ponent and be cross examined in
turn.
Michigan's team has participat-
ed in 20 debates on the labor ques-
tion with colleges in the midwest,
speaking alternately on the affir-
mative and negative sides.
The University of Maine's ap-
pearance here is part of a month's
debating tour of midwestern col-
leges.
The debate is open to the public.
LWarren Weil Elected
Campus VO President
Warren Weil has been elected
president of the campus Veterans
Organization to fill the vacancy
created by the resignation of Bill
Haydon,
Elections for treasurer and cor-
responding secretary will be held
at the regular VO meeting Tues-
day.

Smoe To Make Way for Fools
An April Fool program featur- life. Coming events of each week
ing takeoffs on various aspects of are presented along with Michigan
campus life will be presented on
"Michigan Maie," weekly..Uni- trditions.
versity radio program, at 1:45 p.m. These facts and traditions about
tomorrow over Station WPAG. Michigan life are presented by the
Deviating from the regular pro- "Spirit of Michigan" and the
cedure, the "Spirit of Michigan" companion Smoe who focus their
and his companion, Smoe, who us- "Campuscope" on the center of
ually survey campus activities of the Diag and discuss what is going
the week, will take a holiday, as on. The program is directed by
the program's script writers go William Stegath, a graduate stu-
beserk in their presentation of a dent in the speech department.
one-act play, a sneak look at a --
"Nature Lovers Club" meeting, and Classic Group to Meet
the sad tale of a student who was
lucky enough to get a room with- Prof. F. 0. Copley, of the classi-
in a few steps of the Burton Me- cal studies department, and four
morial Tower. other members of the faculty will
The program, which is co-spon- attend the annual meeting of the
sored by the Union and the Classical Association of the Mid-
League, usually presents informa- dle West and South in Nashville,
tion concerning phases of campus Tuesday through Friday, April 5.

t
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1

HOSPITAL STORY HOUR - Four young patients in the University Hospital listen as a teacher
reads to them in the Kiwanis Playroom, part of the Hospital School which offers an educational and
recreational program for children of all ages.

Prof. Brumm
Backs Press
Cor mmissio
Prof. John L. Brunmn of the
journalism department agrees "on
the whole" with the conclusions
of the special commission of edu-
cators investigating the American
press made public yesterday in
Chicago.
Referring to the commission's'
censure of m o s t journalism
schools for failing to give their
students "broad and liberal train-
ing" and serving only as "inef-
fective vocational" schools, Pro-
fessor Brumm asserted that it is
highly gratifying to him that the
ideal which has always been the
concern of the department should
be so substantiated by nationally
known educators.
The thirteen-member commis-
sion, suggested and largely under-
written by Time, Inc., and head-
ed by Robert M. Hutchins, chan-
cellor of the University of Chica-
go, concluded that freedom of the
press is in danger because of its
bigness, inadequate service to so-
ciety, and malpractice of the men
in charge.
The Great Lakes evaporate
faster during fall and winter
months than during other seasons.

HOMEWORK TOO:
'U' Hospital School Helps Sick
Children Continue Education
By LIDA DAILES dents is equivalent to that which
and JOAN KATZ they would receive in the regular
Graduating students in hospital school. Each subject is taught for
gowns instead of the traditional 15 minutes. According to Mrs.
academic robes is a constant Geraldine Notley, principal of the
source of pride to teachers in the School, the wasted time of class-
University Hospital School. room digressions is eliminated
Maintained for the benefit of through the concentrated efforts
young patients in the hospital, the of the teacher and the student.
School's primary objective is to Homework Given
"keep the children growing and The normal home-school pro-
developing mentally and emotion- cedure is followed even to the pre-
ally while their physical ills are paration of homework. Mrs. Not-
being treated", Miss Dorothy Ket- ley commented that the hospital
cham, Director of Social Serv- students are usually conscientious
ices at University Hospital, said. about their assignments even
Maintains Standards though they can offer "medical
Bringing the mountain to the interruptions" as an excuse.
young Mahomets, the teaching Report cards follow the comple-
staff conducts classes in the wards tion of a unit of work. Grades are
and successfully maintains the forwarded to the patient's home-
home-school standards so that the scho
children can retain their school Pre-school tots are also includ-
standing. ed in the hospital's educational
For the scientifically. inclined, program. Nursery school activi-
chemistry and physics are includ- ties are given in the Galens Work-
ed in the curriculum even to the shop and the Kiwanis Playroom
extent of setting up simple ex- Under the supervision of teach-
periments next to the patients' ers, the young ambulatory pa=
beds. Commercial subjects are also tients play, read and take part
taught to high school students and in a crafts program.
interested adults. "They regard us as a fairy god-
An hour of classes for the stu- M mother or a Santa Claus," Miss

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The blade with the
MONEY-wBACK.
GUARANTrEE!P

SATURDAY NIGHT
MAIN BALLROOM

$1.20

per Couple'

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TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Sold, Rented Repaired
STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
VOCAL RECORIING
From the Field of Opera,
Religious Mnsic and the Art Song

DELIUS; SEA DRIFT, Etc,
Chorus and Orchestra under Beecham
MM 290.
MOZART: OPERATIC ARIAS
Ezio Pinza, Bass
MM 643
PERGOLESI: STABAT MATER
Nollinghaln Choir
EDA 13

$8I()

(Conxtinued hrn l'age &5)
dents offering both sides of the
q u e s t i o n, "Is Intervention in
Greece and Turkey Necessary for
World Peace?" 8 p.m., Robert Ow-
en Co-op, 1017 Oakland. The pub-
lic is invited to participate during
the discussion period. Refresh-
ments and dancing will follow.
Germiani(q ltee hlour, Leigue
Coke ar.i.
Delta Epsilon Pi Society: Mixed
swimmng party meet i intra-
mural Bldg., at 7:1,5 and swimming
until 9:30 p.m.
Lutheran Student Association:
Young Married Couples' Group,
steak supper Student Center,I
1304 Hill Street, 6:30 p.m.
Wnai Writh tulle1 Foumdatiou
J.imewide Discussion will be led by
Prof. William H~aber' following
Sabbath Eve Services at 7:45 p.m.
C"111 ti7l-A vents
The Graduate Outing Club:
Hike, 2:30 pim., Sun., March 30.
Use Northwest entrance, Rack-
ham Bldg. Sign up before noon
on Saturday at the check desk,
Rackham Bldg.
Flying Club: Roller skating par-
ty, Sat., March 29. Meet in the
E. Engineering Bldg. lobby at 7:30
p.m. for transportation
General Electric Company dis-

cusses Employment: All senior
students of the College of Engi-
neering are invited to attend the
open forum on employment to be
conducted by representatives of
General Electric Company at 7:30
p.m., Mon., March 31, 348 W. En-
gineering Bldg. This precedes the
G. E. interviews scheduled for
April 1 and 2.
"Ios Intereses Creados," Span-
ish play, will be presented by the
Sociedad Hispanica on April 1 and
2 in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
at 8:30 p.m. Tickets may be pur-
chased at the box office after 2
p.m. Club members pay only the
federal tax. All seats are reserved.
Saturday Luncheon Discussion:
12:15 p.m., Lame Hall. Rev. Dwight
Baldwin of Lisle Fellowship will
speak on Student Summer' Serv-
ice Projects. For reservations for
the lunch call 4121, Ext. 2148 be-
fore 10 a.m. Saturday morning.
The U. M. hot Record Society:
Sun., March 30, 8 p.m., Hussey
Room, League.
A Model Seder will be presented
at the B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tion on Sun., March 30, 8 p.m. All
are invited to attend. Call 2-6585
for reservations.
The B'nai B'rith Hilled Founda-
tion cordially invites you to its
"Corned Beef Corner." Open Sat.,
10:45-12 midnight.

Rebecca Eiloia, one of the teach-
ers, remarked with a smile.
Equipment for work and play
is bought by the teachers with
an eye toward its educational
value, according to Miss Eilola.
Films for entertainment and in-
struction ar-cprovided by the Ex-
tension Service.
The Hospital School, started in
1923 by Miss Ketcham, is financ-
ed partly by the state, which ap-
propriates funds for instruction of
crippled children, and partly by
gifts from organizations and indi-
viduals. The Kiwanis Clubs of
Michigan and the Galen Society
provide supplies for the playroom,
workshop and library.
GIVE YOUR NEXT
COLLEGE PLAY THAT
Use make-up by a house with
over thirty years experience
in supplying the stage, screen,
churches, clubs, summer
camps, etc. with professional

THE MARLIN FIREARMS COMPANY
Fine Guns Since 1870

$5.25

$11.35

ITALIAN ART SONGS
Guiselpe De Luca, Ba ri/one
Dec. V-1

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department will work out
your individual problems
without charge.
1% Discount to Colhges
GRAY'S DRUG STORE
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CELEBRATED OPERATIC ARIAS
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ADDIO ALLA MADRE (Covalleria Rusticana)
jussif 3joerlbng, Tenor

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MEN!
You may loaf in comfort
this vacation.
Four different Casuals to select
from, including Boss Weejuns in
sizes from 6 to 13 .. .

In the big, new, exciting April issue of SPORT maga-
z ne, Bill Stern, one of America's top sport authorities,
gives his opinion on the question that has been waged
pro and con for years. Read... "Should College Athletes
Be Paid" - plus the more than score of other exciting
and colorful articles and features written by America's
top sports writers . .. all in the April SPORT magazine
now on sale!
DON'T MISS THESE HOT STORIES IN APRIL SPORT:
"Once in a Lifetime" the story of Walter Johnson by
Bill Brandt.
"Durocher - Always On The Spot" by Tom Meany.
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AH! FORS' E LUI (Traviata)
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Vic. 11-9331

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