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March 22, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MARCH 22,

;

ARTS AND SCIENCES:
Michigan Professors Present
Papers at Academy Session

(Continued from Page 1)
a nation which allows freedom of
thought and action, Prof. John
Mason Wells, of Hillsdale College,
told members of the. philosophy
section that though there is no
such state, since when one goal
is achieved people immediately set
another, a nation can strive to
reach new heights or "ideals" of
performance.
Mid-West Industry
"Manufacturing is carried on
most successfully where the plants
are located in the middle of the
market. Nearness to market is a
more important factor than near-
ness to raw materials," Prof. Will-
iam J. Berry, of Western Michi-
gan College of Education, said
before the geography section.
CouncilAnnounces
Hostel Trip Plans
Plans for spring and summer
hosteling and participation in Na-
tional Youth Hostel Week, which
will be held beginning May 1, were
made by the Ann Arbor Hostel
Council this week.
Anyone interested in hosteling
is invited by the Council to phone
2-6551 for additional information.

Sound eugenics and good hu-
manitarianism suggest that the
mentally defective portion of the
population be "discouraged" from
bearing children, but any notion
of a large-scale program of ster-
ilization" should be discarded, Dr.
Sidney L. Halperin, psychologist
'from the Neurospychiatric Insti-
tutte, said in an address to the
morning section meeting on psy-
chology.-
"Genetidally speaking, steriliza-
tion can promise no significant
change in the form of a popula-
tion's intelligence distribution.
Mental deficiency can be ap-
proached and dealt with in rela-
tive terms, but not in terms of
absolute measure. Taken togeth-
er, these facts meangthat despite
strong and prolonged selective
measures, the population would
still contain defective individuals
requiring special attention," Dr.
Halperin asserted.
Other highlights of the Friday
morning sessions included asser-
tions that there can be no general
economic recovery in Europe with-
out restoration of German indus-
try and industrial development of
Central Europe, a plea for more
state legislation on the subject of
labor relations, and recommenda-
tions for new landscape plants in
Michigan.
French Club
'T0 Give Play

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ACHESON ADDRESSES FOREIGN AFFAIRS COMMITTEE - Undersecretary of State Dean Ach-
eson (far right) tells the house Foreign Affairs C ommittee that lie considers any red-dominated
government a menace to the U.S. Committee members include ranking Democrat Sol Bloom (N.Y.,
third from left) Chairman Charles Eaton (Rep., N. J.) John Vorys (Rep., O.) Bartel Jonkman (Rep.,
Mich.) sitting respectively to the left of Bloom.

Light Lunches
.. SOUPS
...SALADS
...SANDWICHES
COKES
8:00 A.M.-10:30 P.M.
Weekdays
8:00 A.M.-12:30 P.M.
Friday-Saturday
Clark's Tea Room
217 Observatory

Moliere's comedy, "Le Malade
Imaginaire," will be presented by
Le Cercle Francais Tuesday, May
6 in the Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre under the direction of Prof.
Charles E. Koella, of the romance
languages department.
The play, which satirizes the
imaginary illnesses of a hypo-
chondriac, will be the 41st annual
stage production of Le Cercle
Francais.
The title role will be played by
Richard Koppitch, graduate stu-
dent and teaching fellow, who
appeared last year as Trissotin in
"Les Femmes Savantes."

Adams Says
'U' Is Anxious
To Help State
The University of Michigan is
anxious to help in every way in
the solution of the State's new
situation in higher education
caused by the growing demaid for
more opportunities for education
beyond secondary school, Provost
James P. 'Adams said before the
University of Michigan Club at
Kalamazoo yesterday.
"The University's own educa-
tional plans and policies must be
an expression of its relationship
to the people of the State, but
they should also reflect a discern-
ing judgment as to the distinct-
ive way in which the University
can serve their interest. It should
not attempt to measure its accom-
plishments in terms of its size or
the multiplicity of its educational
interest. It should measure them
in terms of the quality of its edu-
cational performance."
Iiacuilty A'Ieni, lCs
T o A ttend fMeeting
Prof. Emmet T. Hooper of the
zoology museum, Prof. Paul S.
Dwyer of the mathematics depart-
ment, Prof. Joseph E. Maddy of
the music school and Prof. Ren-
sis Likert of the psychology de-
partment, will attend the first Na-
tional Conference of the United
States Commission on UNESCO, to
be held Monday in Philadelphia.
The principal task of the Con-
ference will be to aid the U. S.
Commission in the development
of a program for education for
peace, the keynote of the United
Nations Educational, Scientific,
and Cultural Organization.

A cross-section of publications
by the University of -Michigan
Press since its inception in 1930
is currently on display in the
General Library.
The University Press is the cen-
tral publishing agency of the
University. with the function of
coordinating and promoting this
institution's publications and pre-
senting through them the work of
Michigan scholars, or studies
based on materials in Michigan's
libraries and museums.
Diversified Selections
Bibliographies, works in the
modern languages, and scientific
treatises are among the diversified
selections. The vast majority of
these books have either been writ-
ten or edited by former or present
members of the faculty. The origi-
nal manuscripts in the W. L.
Clements Library are the source
of many of the volumes in the
case devoted to history.
Of particular interest today is
the series of papers of the Michi-
gan Academy of Science, Arts, and
Letters. This group of educators
and research workers publish an-
nually the results of their labors
in numerous fields such as Botany
and Zoology.
ECarly Works
Although responsibility for Uni-
versity publications was not tak-
en over by the University Press
until 1930, there are many works
which were issued some years prior
to this. The oldest of these is the
Humanistic Series, of which Vol-
ume I appeared in 1904. The later
volumes on display contain repro-
ductions of ancient Coptic Bibli-
cal manuscripts, tax receipts, and
other business transactions as they
were found on the original Greek
papyri,

PRINTED HISTORY:
Library Places University
Press Publications on Exhibit

Included among the more cur-
rent works on exhibit are the biog-
raphies of two early University
presidents, James B. Angell and
Henry P. Tappan.
The exhibit will remain on dis-
play in the lower corridor of the
General Library for one month.
U' Band Will
Give Concert
The annual Spring Concert of
the University Concert Band, con-
ducted by William D. Revelli, will
be presented at 8:30 p.m. Wednes-
day in Hill Auditorium.
Feature work of the program
will be the first movement of the
Caeser Frank Symphony in D
Minor, transcribed for band by
Vernon Malone, conductor of pub-
lic school and municipal bands in
Virginia, Minn.
Other works to be performed
are Russell Howland's transcrip-
tion of Wagner's Selections from
Parsifal, "Grape Festival from
Italian Sketches" by Gallois and
"Symphony Moderne" by Steiner.
De Falla's "Ritual Fire Dance"
and compositions by Darcy, Hen-
neberg, Rimsky-Korsakov, Strauss,
Gould and Grofe comprise the re-
mainder of the program.
'Lionmen' Kill Natives
DARES SALAAM, Tanganyika,
March 21-VP)-Reports reaching
here today from the bush country
said that in the past few months
more than 40 men, women and
children had been killed in the
Singida District of Tanganyika by
what are known as "lionmen."

Dean Recalls
Attainment of
U Freedom
"Struggle of the University of
Michigan to attain its independ-
ence of political interference is an
important chapter in the history
of American education," Dean J.
B. Edmonson of the education
school said yesterday at a meeting
of the Washtenaw Historical So-
ciety.
Dean Edmonson pointed out
that abuses arose in the adminis-
tration of the University under
legislative control, whereby Leg-
islature could and did appoint re-
gents and professors, establish de-
partments, and frame general poli-
cies.
In 1850 the University was made
a constitutional institution with a
Board of Regents, which made it
a coordinate, instead of sub-ordi-
nate, body in the state governmen-
tal structure, thus securing pro-
tection against political interfer-
ence. This procedure, Dean Ed-
monson pointed out, has since
been adopted by other states in
provoiding for higher education.
The work of the University in
encouraging the growth of the
public high school, in contrast
with the negative and discour-
aging attitude of older colleges
and universities, was a significant
contribution in the development
of the American high school, he
said. Its first step in this direc-
tion was in the establishment of
the diploma plan of admissions in
lieu of examinations.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 1021
Angell Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Sat-
urdays).
SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 1947
VOL. LVII, No. 120
Notices
Reapplication for Men's Hous-
ing for the Fall and Spring Se-
mesters of 1947-48: Men students
who are now living in the Resi-
dence Halls and wish to remain in
the Residence Halls for the Fall
and Spring Terms 1947-48 must
file reapplication forms with the
House Director during the week
of March 24. No applications will
be accepted after April 1.
Students, College of Literature,
Science and the Arts: Except un-
der extraordinary circumstances,
courses dropped after today by
students other than freshmen will
be recorded with the grade of "E."
Late and overnight permissions:
The Office of the Dean of Wom-
en accepts requests for late per-
missions only during office hours.
Emergencies arising after the of-
fice is closed are handled by
housemothers. Attention is called
to the student government rule:
"Housemothers may give late per-
mission on week nights (Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thurs-
day) only in the case of unavoid-
able and justifiable emergencies
which arise after the Office of
the Dean of Women is closed for
the day. Such emergency during
the week must be reported by the

student the following day to the
Office of the Dean of Women, at
which time she must present a
(Continued on Page 3)
There is enough water in the
Great Lakes to cover the surface
of the United States to a depth of
15 feet.

11 imt Supper
Tickets for the Indian supper
at 6:30 p.m. tomorrow at the
International Center will be on
sale until noon today in the Cen-
ter office.
Planned by the IHindustan As-
sociation, the menu will consist
of fried rice, curried meat, veg-
etable dishes, and an Indian des-
sert. Tickets are 50 cents each.
Apiheker Talk...
Dr. Herman Aptheker, of the
Jefferson School of Social Science,
will speak on "The Roots of Negro
Oppression" at 8:15 p.m. Tuesday
at the Bethel AME Church.
Preulss Lecture . ..
Prof. Lawrence Preuss, of the
political science department,
will speak on the United Na-
tions voting procedure and its
implications for the control of
atomic energy at the meeting
of the Association of University
of Michigan Scientists at 8 p.m.
Monday in the East Conference
Room of the Rackham Build-
ing.
The Association hopes to
stimulate more interest on the
part of students and faculty
members in its work through the
discussions at this and future
meetings. The membership re-
quirement for the organization

HIGHLIGHTS ON CAMPUS

- Last Times Today -
1 :24-4:00-6:40-9:20 P.M.
.lZNt~lIw rT 7fE/riA

is an A.B. degree nor equivalent)
in science and experience in
scientific research or teaching.
FEPC Foru e -
The Ann Arbor Adult Education
Council will sponsor a forum on
FEPC at 8 p.m. Wednesday at the
Ann Arbor High School.
The discussion will be open to
the public.

I

UERTH
OUR PRICE:
Weekdays until 5 P.M., 25c
Evenings and Sundays, 30c
- Last Day Today -
ANGEL ON MY SHOULbER
with Paul Muni, Anne Baxter
-- and
THAT TEXAS JAMBOREE
- Sunday and Monday -
CLOAK AND DAGGER
Gary Cooper, Lilli Palmer
--- and --
BAMBOO BLONDE

I

MICHIGAN
NOW
OF
GAMBLERS,I
GUNMEN and
,,-LITTERING GIRLSI
SBRIARAn
m " s
FlIZ®ERMh

I

For that
Delicious Midnight Snack
Try
Miller's Box Lunch
Golden Brown Chicken
or Fried Jumbo Shrimp
Home-made Rolls and Individual Pies
Call 2-7171
We Deliver Anywhere, Anytime

-- Coming Sunday -
D EANNA
DURBIN
"I'LL BE
YOURS"
with -
TOM DRAKE
ADOLPHE MENJOU

-also-

Tom and Jerry
Cartoon

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CLASSIFIEDADVERTISINGj

at the EQQL)"sign
Special Student Breakfasts
7:00 - 11:00 A.M.
TODAY'S LUNCHEON SPECIALS
Spaghetti and Meat Sauce . .. 65c
Meat Loaf... 65c
DQN0AL rII 1

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Friday, gold top Eversharp pen
on campus. Finder call Bill Moll, 423
Adanms, 2-4401. )54
LOST-Eversharp gold Fountain Pen.
Engraved Fred J. Somkin. Address
West Lodge, Ypsi. Reward. )2
LOST-Black leather notebook in Wil-
low village. W. W. Payne, 1328 Oak-
ham. Reward. )15
WILL PERSON who accidentally took
brown overcoat from George's Place
on Monday morning please call 2-0744.
Ask for Bob. )18.
PI'KED UP by mistake from SLATER'S
Bvaktore, our Publisher's Weekly
Spring Announcement issue. Reward.
Slater's Bookstore. 336 S. State St. )22
WILL PERSON who accidentally took
gray gabardine topcoat from Sugar
Bowl last Friday please call 6589, Mr.
Lancaster to arrange for exchange.
)11
LOST: Small red purse: containing
Ronson lighter and C.A. Eversharp
pen. Barbara Landsberg. 1027 E. Uni-
versity, ph. 9322. )63
WANTED
PERMANENT HOME-Mother and adult
daughter; English-speaking Belgium
i"migrants, arriving soon in Ann Ar-
bor. Need apartment or rooms -
preferably near campus - will ex-
change housework for living quar-
ters. Excellent references. Financially
secure with permanent income. Phone
2-2020. )
Read and Use
The Daily Classi ieds!

MISCELLANEOUS

328 East Liberty Street

'AND THE NIGHT shall be filled with
Music." That is, if your radio works
O.K. If not, call 9241 or leave it at
The Tavern Cafeteria for quick repair
service. )62
FOR SALE
ICEBOX-100 lb. capacity. Good condi-
tion. 1215 So. Univ., Apt. 1. 7 - 9
p.m. ) 76
REAR yourcchildren with Electronics.
"Electronic Baby Sitter" will reliably
watch your baby, day or night. Priced
reasonably. Call 2-1371 )24
ATTENTION, GOLFERS-Let me help
you select your golfing needs. Com-
plete lines of all top-grade clubs,
bags, balls. Phone 2-2058. Johnny
Malloy, Golf Professional. )13
FOR SALE-Combination RCA Radio-
phonograph. Large automatic con-
sole model. Approximately six years
old. If interested, phone Len Kauf-
man, 4315, after 7 p.m. )53
FOR SALE-The last of Winter Stock.
Special Clearance Sale on Winter
Dances. Cut yourself in on a bargain
at the CAPITALISTS' BALL, Friday,
March 28, 9-12:30, Union. Your last
semi-formal before spring holiday. Tn
more ways than one, you will "Dance
with Joy." )64
A BETTER PRICE paid for Men's used
clothing. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. )14
BUSINESS-SERVICES
TYPING: Theses. term papers, etc.
Duplicating: notices, form letters,
programs. A2 Typing Service, 232
Nickels Arcade. phone 9811. )55

HELP WANTED
A CAREER FOR YOU-The telephone
company offers interesting work, com-
fortable quarters, cafeteria on prem-
ises, vacations with pay, thrift plans,
advancement. For further informa.-
tion call 9985 between 8 and 5. Mich-
igan Bell Telephone Co. )33
YOUNG LADY to work at Soda foun-
tain. No Sundays or evenings. Swifts
Drug Store, 340 S. State. Ph. 3534. )60
TAILORING and SEWING
DRESSMAKING Dresses, Suits. For-
mals, and Bridal Gowns. Alterations.
For appointments, call Mrs. Ringinen.
2-2604. )52
ANNOUNCING an addition in person-
nel. We feel free to offer prompt ser-
vice. Let us help you plan your spring
and summer wardrobe. Hildegarde
Shop. 116 E. Huron, 2-4669. )19

Art Cinema League presents
"A super-thriller with psychopathic elements added
for extra zingo ... a masterpiece!"-Winsten. N. POST
- i-in FRENCH
with English' Titles
"Excellent - one of FRITZ LANG'S best"
COOK, World Telegraph
Also: "Out of Darkness,"
a film short subject on Belgian underground newspaper
Thurs., Fri., Sat., March 20, 21, 22 - 8:30 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Box Office Opens 2 P.M. Daily
Admission 42c (tax incl.) Reservations Phone 6300
r-

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TRANSPORTATION

North Main Opposite Court Hous
- Starts Today -
Roy Rogers in
"HOME IN OKLAHOMA"
-- plus
Judy Canova in
"SINGIN' N THE CORN"
Jungle Girl, Chapter r
RKO News

&T-00-

1

1st CHICKEN: Why do the chickens cross the 4p
*street?0
2nd CHICKEN: I don't know, why?0
* 1st CHICKEN: To get to METZGER'S to be sure 0
* of getting into that fine Chicken-in-the-Rough, *
* of course. Yak! Yak! Yak. 0
* 0
*h
* 0
*0
FOR THEFINEFST 1 a

TWO STUDENTS desire ride to Esca-
naba or vicinity April 4 or 5. Share
expenses. Phone 8844, t )3
TWO FELLOWS bound for N.Y.C. or
vicinity this vacation. Will share ex-
penses of car ride, Call Wym Price,
2-1583. )21

THE FARM CUPBOARD
Specializing in FRIEJD CHICKEN DINNERS
Open 11:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. including Sundays.
5400 Plymouth Road (on the way to Detroit) Phone 9387
HOME OF GOOD FOOD
Lunches 11:30-1:30 - only 65c
Dinners (family style)-5:00-8:00 P.M.-$1.45 to $1.65

I]

6

ART CINEMA LEAGUE and AVC
Present
A GIEIA'T NEW FRENCH FILM-

418 E. Washington (one-half block off State)

Phone 9717

-- - - ---

YOU'VE TRIED THEM ALL!
NOW try the.

such praise'for a film!
t~"'
1 ~

also
'ART Survives the Times,
Art is shown coming home to the
Louvre and Versailles
Utrillo, Braque, Matisse, Picasso
arc visited in their studios.

THE MAYFLOWER
BREAKFASTS ... LUNCHEONS ... DINNERS
Waffles our specialty . . . Better Coffee
307 South Main Street
COTTAGEINN
Specializing in Home Cooked Food . . . Steaks and Chops
Open Weekdays 11:00 A.M. - 1:30 P.M., 5:00 - 8:00 P.M.
Sundays 11:00 A.M. -2:00 P.M., 5:00- 9:00 P.M.

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