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March 14, 1947 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-03-14

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isAGT SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, ?VIA.R" 14, 1947

.. ...........RT X... ... .. ...F ...........-D.... ....

NO SHOOTING:
Foi'ei"ii Policy Development
Is Seen as Wli'1aCVer~t
AP F'oreigni Affairs Anialy, Pres;ident Truman says in ef-
New developments in admninis- fe c.I that we (did not fight the war
tration foreign policy do not m?an
ti shooting war. 10c ht nge one form of totalitar-
Ch the ('otrary, tle o s; i i, ' i fr iP othler. We intenld
to do what the W('SLP1 ii , ioly t (11( ucanex-
failed to doC)in the (early yltut ~ag O to stalih aout-
prevent war. '' ~ta~ oCt1)ihot
In the first place, it isgaiistih;pentraionint
ate o trm.thi a newl~ocy tl" 1' l piortiof(4the yworld which
ateto eimthi ~1U(WP~lCY e. con.,sider" our own.
In one way it is nmerely the exten- Rusawnsowrcnt
Sion of a very old policy...that of Rsi at owr ant
the onre Dctrne frinithesustain a war, and will not wit-
Western Hemisphere to free pieo- tnl omtayatwihwl
ples everywhere, In another wvay. lead to one, a.t least for some time.
it s mrel a eveopmnt f ;Clear knowledge on her part that
something which is less an adopt- fatv usac fhrplce
ed policy than a position into w ill edefinitely lead to war can onhe Ha-
which we have been forced. shorserveto ethpeno rafthmer.h
('ace-Saving Outburst
Germ I2aji ( 4(d lee I111h- It will not be at all surprising
A coffee and conversation hiour no if, after a brief face-saving
theausics o te Grmn Iioutburst, we find Russian commru-
under athenauspicl e fite el rmtoan sm adopting at least the ap-
derm et wni hehe l tday p learance of greater reasonable-
from3 t 5 pm. n th Legueness both at hiome and abroad.
Cafeteria. All students of Ger-
rrra areinvied.President Truman has served
man ae invtednotice that so far as totalitarian-
ism is concerned, there is no corn-
TYPEWRITERS promise; the world of today,
Bought, Sold, Rented repaired' like the nation of Lincoln't day,
r"cannot endure permanently half
STUDENT & OFFrICE SUPPLIES I slave and half free."
0. ID. MORRILIL I If war comes eventually, it will
314 S. State St. Phone 7177 1 be in spite of these efforts to pre-
__________________________________ -ient it.

Pi ll t'o 75 and $50 v ill be
tA e Iiis yeat forthe bt'st es-
say s ubinitted in the klizabeth
S'trflelt Tw N1d(icuIl lli,(to y Con-
k it 1 (u1 ,ctilC'f'Yiing medical re-
SU~iti UII d-&~e'iSthe inidus-
Li ju M' t- ;Ind iac''t ore of med-
hinws, or, they may also tr'eat oft
individuals or organizations that4
have p~layed some interesting part
i11 the h ist ory of medicine.
Pcordiiig to Charles H-. Peake,
a., asisAataid(ean of the literary col-
le., who announced the contest.
essays on the history of various
iinflt of the medical services in
bttaon evacuation hospitals,
bataliiiaid stations1 and the like
miay be submitted.
The ctetst is restricted to jun-
ior alnd senior pre-medical stu-
(hdelts. Essays should be from
3,000) to 5,000 words in length and
s hould be typed in double space
on regular sized manuscript pa-
per'. Two copies must be submnit-
;I ted to lmcan Peake's office by May

STATE DEPT. SAYS:,
Passports Are Now Available

For Student T
Students who want to go arbroad
this summer should have little
trouble in securing passports, the
State Department told The Daily
yesterday.
Passports are being issued for
travel in all countries of the West-
ern Hemisphere and in Europe
with the exception of Austria and
Germany according to Oliver J.
Caldwell of the division of inter-
national exchange of persons.
"The Department knows of no
difficulty which would be encoun-
ter-ed by students who desire to
procure passports," he said. "Con-
sideration will be given to the is-
sue of passports to students upon
receipt of regular applications
available through this office."
University students may avail
themselves of fellowships, whichj
Caldwell said are "occasionally of-
fered by foreign governments and
educational institutions."
Most of these fellowships, hie
said, are administered by the In-
stitute of International Education,
2 West Forty-fifth Street, New
Ytork.

ravel Abroad
Several countries in Europe and
Asia are expected to participate
in the student exchange programs
authorized by Public Law No. 5,84,
the Fulbright Act, according toi
Caldwell.
Paul T. K..Liii Will
Speak Here Today
Paul T. K. Lin, general secretary
of' the Chinese Students Chistian
Association, will speak onl "Two
Way Opportunity of the Chinese,
Students in America" at 3 p.m to-
day at Lane Hall.
Lin, who graduated from thew
University in 1943, is visitingr the
mid-west chapters of the, C.S.C.A.
He is particularly interes:ted inin h-
Svestigating the problems and the
needs of the Chinese students
and strengthening the fellowship
among chapters He Will discuss
factors involved in building one
world onl the college campus.
A tea will follow.

TRUMAN ASKS All) FOR GREECE AND TURtKEY- President Truman (renter), sp-eaking before a
jinift session of Congress, asks aid for Gireece and T uirkey. At far upper left are Sen. Arthur "Vandeni-
berg (Rep., Mich.) , Senate president pro-teni (left) and Miume Speaker' Joseph Martin (Rep., Mass.).
In center 'foregr'oud are (from left) Adm,. William Leahy, M~aj. Gen. Harry Vaughn, ('apt. Janes It.
Foskett.

A STRON(;ER VOICE:
Influx of Women into Public
.Affairs Reflected by Lectures

Tfhe groawing importance (of
women in public affairs5 might be
measured byv the increasing fre -
qutency with W'lielh women speak-
er have appeared in the Oratori-
cal Association lecture series.
The appearance of Margaret
Webster, famous Shakespearean
actress and director. March 22 in
Hill Auditorium, is another in al
long series of talks by the most
prominent women of their time.
Actresses During 1920'x
In the early 1920's, when the
Oratorical Association, previously
a debate society, took over the
functions of the old Student Lec-
ture Association, the only women
appearing in the series were
actresses. Edith Wynne Matthison
appeared in "~scenes flrom the
drama" with her actor husband,
Charles Rand, Kennedy, several
times during those years, and Gay
MacLaren also gave dramatic in-
terpretations.
The first woman speaker promi-
nent in national affairs was the
late Carrie Chapman Catt, the
women's suffrage leader, who
spoke in 1("23. An exotic note wvas
added in 1923 by Princess Canta-
cuzene, the grand-daughter of
General Grant, who had married
a Russian prince and was exiled
from the Soviet~s during the 1- i -
sian revolution.

eni by Peggy Wood, Cornelia Otis
Skinner and Dorothy Sands, and,
in more recent years, Ruth Draper.
Wonell Journalists
One of the most distinguished
women journalists of our time,
Dorothy Thompson, spoke on the
lecture series in 1936 and again in
1940. Another women journalist,
Anne O'Hare McCormick, the only
women ever to get the Pulitzer
Prize for outstanding foreign cor-
respondience, spoke in 1941.
Other widely -known w onmen who
have spoken here in recent years
include Mrs. Franklin D. Roose-
velt, Eve Curie, photographer Mar-
garet Bourke-White, Ilka Chase,
Ruth Mitchell, who served as a
dispatch rider with the Chetniks
in Yugoslavia, Madame Welling-
ton -Koo, wife of the Chinese am-
hassador to London, and Lillian
Gish.
'theatrical to Political
The 1945-46 Oratorical Associ-
ation series was opened by Helen
Gahagann Doug las, who stepped
from the theatrical to the politi-
cal stage to becoine repriesen tative
from California, and also featured
Frances Perkins and Madame Vi-
Jaya Lakshnni Pand it, the sister of
.Ja waliaral Nehr.
Miss Webster will he the second

Church News
Several student religious groups
are planning to have parties to-
day.
Members of the LUTHI I A N
STUDENT ASSOCIATION will
meet at 7:30 p.m. at1.1he Cen I er
for a roller-skating par'ty.
After the party, they 'will re-
turn to the Center for ielriesli-
ments.
The YOUNG MARRIEDS of the
LUTHERAN STUDE'NT ASSOCI-
ATION will meet at 8 p.m. at thei
home of Prof. affll Mrs. 1~5,7111 G.
lKauper.

1.
Those interested in the compe-
tition may consult Dean Peake or~
m rember s of the committee ap-
Ipointed to judge the contest: Prof.
Frederick Test of the zoology de-
partment; Prof. Adam A. Christ-
man of the chemistry department;
and Prof. John Arthos of t he
Engl ish Department.
The con(!iitest was hield for the
I ir~st time last year. At that time
lhe Lop awar'd was granted to Ber-
niall W. Agranoff for his essay
'"Penicillin: An Industrial Tri-
YWCA 'fficial
Arr~i'es Here

Reservations, esraio.;for the METE 01)D- 'Mris. Virgijnia Walters. member
isTr YOUNG WEDS Saint Puit-j of file national board of the l

ga'd & sewop4 Ikte4:
Who cares whether the clouds roll completely by or not
with such a galaxy of scintillating stars popping out all
all over that inverted bowl they call the sky? . .. Omar
doesn't stand a chance. M-G-M's new album "eTill the
Clouds Moll By" (recorded directly from the souned
track of the production) will lay you in the aisle of mem-.
ory. . . Lena Horne, Toni .Martin, Virginia O'Brien,
June Allyson and Caleb Peterson doing a strig of all-
time favorites including "'Make Believe," "'Who Cares If
My Boat Goes Up Stream?," "tLife Upon the Wicked
Stage," Cleopatterer" and "eave It to Jane" make for
something that you must have upon your record shelves
or you will really lead a life of frustration in the future
..Now that we've warned you . .. we'll see you at..
THE RADIO AND RECORD SHOP
713 North U~nversity, Phone 2.0542
North End of Diagonal

rick's party to be held at 6
can be made by calling 6881.

P1.YWCA,
tf 'rd'ty
MITrOW

arrived in Ann Arbor yes-
and will remain until to-
to interview all women

.A block of tickets for "The Mar-
riage of Figaro" has been reserved
by the ROGER WILMIAMS GUILD
for its members, who will meet at
8 p.m. at the Guild House.
Saint Patrick's Day will be th« I
theme of a party to be held by the
NEWMAN CLUB from. 8 pim. to
midnight in the club room~s of SI,
Mary's Chapel.
The WESLEYAN GCU 111) and
the CONGREGATIONAL-DISC1-
PLES GUILD will have a filay-
Loft Ho-Down at 8:30 pm. in t.10
Methodist Social Hall.
John Craig will call the squfarer
dances. An internmission show is
to be presented, and refr'siliunt bs
will be served.

interested in permanent positions
with the organization.
The types of jobs open are of
an executive nature, and include
at, present 150 positions in the
fields of health and physical edu-
cation, industrial girl and teen-
age counseling, and as general
comnunity secretaries. '.raining
is car ried on by the national or-
g-.nizO tion, hut employes are plac-
ed by recommrendation to the local
'hapters. and may either refuse
or accept indivd ual appointments.
All applicants must be college
t' riidiiates or graduating seniors.
A ith ough experience is desirable.
it is not necessary, and college
majors in social studies are not
requlired.

,endMony Oder r Ccrk ifya.- are not completely satis fied, return jacket
wih m dy for full refund. m m m m
va0.61 am No am so Am ~~am mm _ Y~ft01wmm m mm ~ m N N me smO~f m
r {"OSB &1 Q ,i 1 Dept. 11 Box 486, Newark 1, N. J.
* SUIT SIZE .............. HEIGHT.......
NAM .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .
SAMDE........................................................ E
I iCITY ..............................ZONE..STATE...............1
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1,mmmmm me mmam aw m 1w as as maam w w ~ a w w r w ram - me am10w1am m m - wma

Russan Eilewomen speaker in this year's
Russan Eileserires. The lprevious *one was Mrs.
Another Russian exile, who Rod Clapper, widow of the
spoke here in 1930 on "My Old
World Background for a Mod- !widely-knownricolumnist anrdi
ern Life," was the Grand Duchess Washington correspondent.
Marie.
The entrance of women into the Graduate School Mixer'
field of law was marked in Ann WtH -i P
Arbor by tiie appearance of Flor- I uI odaIy
ence E. Allen, justice of the Ohioa A mixeir for graduate aespeecut note il students
Stat surem cort, ntothefied will be held at 8:30 p.m.n today in
of exploration by the appearanceX the Rackhain Building.
of' Osa Johnson with her famous Thie mixer, one of a series spon-
explorer husband, and into the 1sor'ed by the Graduate Student
diplomatic service by the appear-C Coun~cil, will include- dancing,
once of Ruth Bryan Owen, thenI cards, and refreshments.

.. r' r

L,

_._..___._ r

If

I ____~ --- --- -

---- - - --W

I

They're Oceans Apart on:
"What's Best in Esquire?"

A few weeks ago, we showed four of' your
college clmims an advance copy of the April
issue of Esquire (noo~ on your newsstand).*We
asked them to name their favorite feature,
and they all picli ed a different o11e.

I'U'(bIi 1 Omt~am- wanfl " tJUi k lllsl 1i,4 o4f
right ini Populaur Fsvor gae suggestth
folloing, all of wlhich are 11'itois 514Wck.

rt"
F-'
/f()
' ,/r l
I,' i
Jam. .
' ...

BEETHOVEN: SYMPHONY NO. 7
Philad/elph/ia On /'/cira I fld ('1 (h i/Id/it/
MM 557 . . .. .. .
BEETHOVEN: VIOLIN CONCERTO
D)M 705 . .. .. . .. . .. .
BRAHMS: SYMPHONY NO. 4
'hilalel p/na OrchcstIra under Ormin /idy
M M 567 . . . . . . . . . . .
CHOPIN: PIANO MUSIC
Vladimir llororu'il
DM 1034 .......... .. . . . . . . . .
ENESCO: ROUMANIAN RHAPSODIES
P/)n~arllh'i~a Orc/)e'lra an/idlN'ainal S1 inp/niny
DM 830( . . . . ...). . .

$6.13
$6.30

ATHLETE PREFERS TRAVEL REPORT
'I'liat t'(IINl aticle on - ',-etina iziade
mte ntco 1tora i~e fe ir'st plane10to Atos
I ir's. It's terrafi°! lit fact, the -whole
1'sqniic trarel series has mry vote."
J'ACK MARTIN, '47
Signa Alpha Epsilon
Trrack Stara
EDITOR SELECTS STORY BY KERSHI
"(Gerald Kershs pies-e, Sharks, has tre-
inendous punch dtIt drata. Esquire has
alwat' n joi']f r ictiort, and this
onetops theirtill."

SCHOLAR CHI
" Your screen
tr the few vhc
Hollywood. i:
Pursifrdl is ex

OOSES MOVIE COLUMN
critic, Jfack Jlloffitt, is one
to write intelligently a bowt
s review of the new pict nre,
DICK BURTON, '48
Theta Xi -

(I,.

CAMPUS POLITICO LIKES CARTOONS
"A1y favorites, any mnonh, arc the ctar-
toons. Best of all, in my opinion, are
Webb's tobacco-chewing Alountait Boys
and also those Harem Girls.".
HARRY JACKSON, '48
Delta Upsilon,
Pres., Inter-Fr-aternity Council

rt f
\
.. { l
'll '
\
.- ' ti ti ......-
.: _-

. ..-

BOB POTTER, '47
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
General Manager, Michigan Dail:

$2.98

MOZART: SYMPHONY NO. 35 (HAFFNER)
J.(/fldon iiJIlharmonni ic /nder BIY/cl //
M M tt399 -.....------------ - s--,0 ,94

i s*ii

0@ ®

"UNSURPASSED"

MOZART: SYMPHONY NO. 36
Io !r . 1idiiPhilhart oicit' 1d er l1 'e hamii
11:%387---------------

(LINZ)
-. ...$4.99

,1 .,.
' ' "'

STRAUSS: DEATH AND TRANSFIGURATION
Philadelphia 0, ehesh/-a aunder Orr indl
JMM 613-----------------------------4.20

TSCHAIKOYSKY: SYMPHONY NO. 5
lond on Philha rmnic under B~eechami
ttM M 470 .. . . . . . . . . . . . .

...$6.30

EVERYTHING"
"THE ~ -
VERY i, -17

ONE"

but

they're in the same boat on:

T1SCHAIKOVSKY: SYMPHONY NO. 6
(Pothetique),
New York Philharmonic under Rod insk,
AIM 558 ...............................$6.30
An extensile stock, pleasanti/a tiniN/here, inn swally, trained
.}nY.~ wI - nf,1.)1ft-i ,Y C /)i.., 1f17 i.......... 1 1 U s/ f fII.

"Esquire

Sure they disagreed on what's
hest in Esquire. One pr'eferred
the fiction; another, the travel

It

ItI

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