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March 07, 1947 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Dormitory News

i .

The walls of MOSHER HALL
vibrated to the sound of Michigan
songs when the dormitory held a
house sing Wednesday night. Re-
freshments were served after the
sing.
Last night two exchange din-
hers were held in campus dormi-
tories. Approximately 80 couples
participated in an exchange din-
ner between STOCKWELL HALL
and ADAMS HOUSE. ALLEN-
RUMSEY HOUSE and MOSHER
HALL had an exchange dinner for
65 couples.
In a recent house election,
LLOYD HOUSE 'elected Jack
Schmitt president, Bob Weber,
vice-president, Tom Frane, sec-,
retary and Art Bradley, treasurer.
The first issue of the Mosher
Mirror, dormitory project for
sophomore women in MOSHER
HALL appeared yesterday. The
paper contained features, poems
and gossip items.
Officers recently elected by
ALLEN-RUMSEY iHOTf13E. sre:
Don Massnick, president, Art
Doersan, secretary, Bill Lichten-
berg, treasurer, Prentice Ryan,
athletic chairman and Jack Diet-
rich, re-elected social chairman.
A starfish will eat 'moie than
eight oysters in a day.,

Prom Ticket
Sales to Sophs
Will Continue
Ticket sales for the Soph Prom,
which will be held Friday, March
14, will continue being sold to
sophomores at the travel desk
from 1 to 5 p.m. in the Union and
in University Hall the remainder
of the week, according to Al Sand-
man, ticket chairman.
Beginning Monday sales will
open to members of all classes and
will be sold from 8 to 12 and 1 to
5 p.m. in the Union and Univer-
sity Hall. Tickets will be limited
to comfortable dancing capacity.
The prom, which is a revival of
the annual dance sponsored each
year by the sophomore class, will
feature the music of Bob Chest-
er. Late permission has been
granted to coeds attending the
dance.
Pictures for the dance will be
taken by Chuck Bayless, photog-
rapher for the J-Hop and the Pay-
Off dances. According to tradi-
tion, no corsages will be worn ex-
cept by members of the central
committee and their dates.
Duke Dosier, general chairman
for the dance, announced that
there will be a meeting of the cen-
tral committee in Rm. 308 in the
Union at 2 p.m. Saturday. Any
sophomore interested in working
on the ticket or decorations com-
mittee may call Dosier at 4183.

Campus Highlights

Li

Architectural Talk .. .
Ernest Kump, a San Francisco
architect, will speak on "What the
Architect Should Not Know" at
4:15 pm. Wednesday in Rm. 102,
architecture building.
Kump is especially interested in
designing school buildings and
has worked principally along this
line, although he has planned
many other public buildings.
Lenten Devotions
Lenten devotions, including
Stations of the Cross and Ben-
ediction, will be held at 7:30
p.m. today at St. Mary's Chap-
el.
Sunday Supper .
It was announced a program 'of
recorded folk songs will be pre-
sented at 8 p.m. following supper.
The musical program is open to
the public.
Sick iii To r Talrf
"Archaeological Research and
Discovery in China During the
War Years" will be the subject of
a fine arts department illustrated
lecture by Laurence Sickman at
4:15 p.m. today in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Sickman is curator of oriental
art at the William Rockhill Nelsont
Gallery of Art, Kansas City, Mo.

A program of recorded folk
songs will be presented at 8 p.m.
following supper. The musical
program is open to t\e public.
Supper is served at 7 p.m. There
is a charge of 50 cents per per-
son.
Armenian Students . .
The Ainrenian Students As-
sociation will hold a meeting at
7:30 p.m. today in Rm. 305 of
the Union.
Canterbury Club
The Canterbury Club will hold
open house from 4 to 6 p.m. today
at the Student Center.
* * * *
Hillel Services. .
Following Sabbath Eve Ser-
vices at 7:45 p.m. today in the~
Hillel Chapel, the IZFA will put
on an Oneg Shabbat.
The program wil include
songs, prayers and readings.
Bible Studies . .
A series of five Bible studies
conducted b y t h e Michigan
Christian Fellowship will be con-
cluded at 7 p.m. today in the Up-
per Room of Lane Hall.
Following the study, there will
be an informal get-together and
refreshments in the Fireside
Room.

Assume Active
Part in Politic.
The two Brazilians who wer
first holders of University ex
change scholarships for that coup
try pare now taking an active pa
in the political and education
affairs of their country, accordin
to Robert B. Klinger, assistar.
counselor at the Internation
Center.
The first scholarship holder
1939-40, Dr. Osvaldo Trigueir
is now serving as governor of ti
State of Paraiba in Brazil. 1
specialized in political science i
his study here.
Paschoal Lemme, the secon
student in that year, is now
member of the Executive Con
mittee of the Instituto Brasil-E
tados Unidos in Rio de Janier
The organization is similar to ti
Office of the Coordinator of Inte:
American Affairs in the Unite
States.
Two scholarships have bee
made available to Brazilian stL
dents each year since 1939.
Bill Asks Overhaul of
Compensation Agency
LANSING, March 6-(A)--TI
separation of the State Workmer
Compensation Commission fro
the State Department of Lab
and Industry is proposed in a b
being prepared today for- introduc
tion in the' House of Representf
Lives.

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,_om _ies

this is my home. No housing problem for me.

, * . - momplooffsom IW

I've got a place to live ... for years. This is it.
This wheel chair, supplied-along with the finest of
medical care, food and nursing-by the U. S. A.
It's all mine, free, in exchange for services rendered at
some places I'd rather forget.
It could be a lonesome little home-so lonesome -
But your Red Cross helps keep it cheerful!
The Red Cross, working under direct supervision of Army, Navy, and Veterans
hospital authorities, brings me music, games, books.. .
writes for me the letters that I can't write myself.. .
keeps me in touch with my family and friends back home...
helps me to dream, to hope .. . r

IN

PLEASE: Keep the American Red Cross visiting
iy home. Give, so that the Red Cross will be able
te help 4henever and wherever human beings are in
trouble: in veterans hospitals, in servicemen's
camps and bases-at home and overseas, in disaster-
stricken communities, in your own neighborhood.

GIVE-so your RED CROSS can carry on!

I,

'<1

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