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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 07, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-03-07

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E MICHIGA

lief Justice Vinson Issues
)urt Opinion in Lewis Case

WASHINGTON, March 6--)-
.otations from Chief Justice
nson's opinion in the John L.
wis contempt case:
'The trial court properly found
e defendants (Lewis and the
ited Mine Workers) guilty of
milal contempt. Such con-
ript had continued for 15 days
. It was an attempt to repu-
.te and override the instrument
lawful government in the very
Lation in which governmental
;ion was indispensable."
vil Contempt
'The trial court also properly
int; tyre defendants guilty of
11 contempt. Judicial sanction
civil contempt proceedings may,
a proper case, be employed for
her or both of two purposes: to
3rce thedefendant into compli-
6e with the court's order, and to
npensate the complainant for
ses sustained."
s think .the record clearly
rrants a fine of $19,000 against
eendant Lewis for criminal con-
npt A majority of the court,
wever, does not think that it
rrants the unconditional im-
sition of a fine of $3,500,000
ainst the defendant union. It
1 be modified so as to require
defendant union to pay a fine
$700,000, and further, to pay
additional fine of $2,800,000
less the defendant union, with-
five days . . . shows that it has
ly complied with the temporary
traiing order issued Nov. 18,
d the preliminary injunction is-
d Dec. 4, 1946."
thdraw Notie
'The defendant union can ef-
t full compliance only by with-

.

drawing unconditionally the no-
tice given by -it, . . . on Nov. 15,
1946 to J. A. Krug, Secretary of
the Interior, terminating the
Krug-Lewis (working) agreement
as of Nov. 20 and by notifying its
members of such withdrawal.--
and by withdrawing . . . any oth-
er notice to the effect that the
Krug-Lewis agreement is not in
full force until the final determin-
ation of the basic issues arising
under the said agreement."
"We well realize the serious pro-
portions of the fines here imposed
upon the defendant union. But
a majority feels that the course
taken by the union carried with it
such a serious threat to orderly
constitutional government, and to
the economic and social welfare of
the nation, that a fine of substan-
tial size is required in order to
emphasize the gravity of the of-
fense of which the union was
found guilty."
Refused Obedience
"The restraining order sought
to preserve condition until the
cause could be determined, and
obedience by the defendants would
have secured this result. They
had full opportunity to comply
with the order of the district
court, but they deliberately refus-
ed obedience and determined for
themselves the validity of the or-
der."
Highlights from a dissenting
opinion by Justice Rutledge, who
was joined by Justice Murphy:
"Since in my opinion the order
was jurisdictionally invalid when
issued by virtue of the War La-
bor Disputes Act and its adoption
of the Norris-LaGuardia Act's
policy, it follows that the viola-
tion gave no sufficient cause for
sustaining the conviction for con-
tempt."
"The power of the federal courts
to issue stay orders to maintain
the status quo pending appeal, like
other matters affecting their jur-
isdiction except in the case of
this court's original jurisdiction, is
subject to Congress's control.

TRUMAN VISITS THE PYRAMID, OF THE MOON--President
Harry S. Truman of the U.S. stands in his car and points to sights
of interest at the age-old pyramid to the moon at Teotihuacan, 28
miles n'orth of Mexico City.
BLIND LEAD HALT:
Gargoyl-e To PresentQuick,
Painless Guide to Education

'U' Lecturer
Is Honored for
Radio Paper
The Browder J. Thompson Me-
morial Award for the year's best
technical paper on radio engi-
neering has been received by
Charles L. Dolph, lecturer in
mathematics at the University.
Limited to young men under 30
years of age, the cash prize award
was presented to Dr. Dolph in a
ceremony held in New York last
Wednesday.
Presenting a mathematical so-
lution to improvements in radar,
Dr .Dolph's prize-winning paper
was written while he served as a
Naval Research expert during the
war. It was published last June
in the Proceedings of the Institute
of Radio Engineers.
A member oi the radio division
of the Naval Research Laboratory
near Washington, D. C., Dr. Dolph
was engaged in a wartime research
project on radar, which involved
an "improved method of identi-
fying aircraft and ships as friend-
ly or hostile."
Receiving his B.A. degree in
mathematics at the University in
1939, Dr. Dblph then proceeded to
Princeton University where he
served as an instructor in mathe-
matics until obtaining his Ph.D.
Besides his position of lecturer
at the University, Dr. Dolph also
serves as a member of the mathe-
matics group engaged in engineer-
ing research at Willow Run.
Life Saving
To Be Taught
A free course in senior life sav-
ing will be given by the Ann Ar-
bor Red Cross chapter starting at
7:30 p.m. Monday in the Intra-
mural swimming pool.
In the past a considerable num-
ber of University students have
taken this course for the purpose
of securing positions. as counsel-
ors in summer camps, a Red Cross
spokesman said.
The course will continue for
four succeeding Monday nights,
according to Red Cross officials.
Both men and women students are
eligible for the course.
Anyone interested in signing up
for this course is asked to phone
the local office of the Red Cross,
2-5546.

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the offfice of the
Assistant to the President, Room 1021
Angell Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Sat-
urdays).

FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1947
VOL. LVII, No. 107

. I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLET

ontinuous from 1

P.M.

By JOAN FISKE
The rumor that "Human Ed"
McKinlay, managing editor of the
Michigan Gargoyle, will replace
Robert M. Hutchins of the Uni-
versity of Chicago is unfounded,
University officials announced to-
day.
McKinlay, recently returned
from an educational conference
in Aberdeen, Washington, could
not be found for comment. Well
informed sources close to the Gar-
goyle office had it that he was in
New York trying out for the Wom-
en's Wear Daily and being fitted
for cap and gown.
What Goes Up
McKinlay's rapid rise in the
field of education istthe result of
the March issue of the Gargoyle.
Devoting himself to the cause of
frustrated veterans driven nearly
mad by the various forms they are
forced to fill out in an effort to
obtain a higher education, Mc-
Kinlay decided to design a quick
and easy guide to education. "I
decided to design a quick and easy

I

guide to education," he once said
candidly.
This revolutionary text, appear-
ing in its first edition under the
title "McGargle's First Reader,"
took laborious minutes to create.
Aided by an enthused and ever
wavering staff, McKinlay barely
managed to get the copy to the
printers on time. The printer
could not be found for comment.
Joie de Vivre
'McGargle's First Reader,"
which makes up the body of the
March issue of the Gargoyle, is the
only sixteen page volume guaran-
teeing a complete education in six-
teen pages.
"The March issue of the Gar-
goyle should appear sometime in
March," Raymond J. Shinn, mal
de siecle of the Gargoyle office,
stated. Daily sources, usually un-
reliable, reported that the .March
issue of the Gargoyle will go on
sale March 14. They were uncer-
tain as to the year.

Now

:. IT'S A
LAUGH-SPREE
INRENO t

Notices
Sorority representatives may call
at the Office of the Dean of'
Women to discuss housing need-
ed for their members outside of
the chapter houses for next fall.
The representatives must bring
with them the full list of members
including those who will live in
the chapter house and those who
will live outside.
Women students attending the
Assembly Ball on Friday, March 7,
have been granted 1:30 a.m. per-
mission. Calling hours will not be
extended.
Hopwood Contests: Attention of
prospective contestants is called
to the following provision: "In
particular or irregular cases the
committee may, upon petition,
waive particular parts of the
rules, but no petition will be re-
ceived by the committee after
March 15, 1947."
Students in Business Adminis-
tration and Economics: Through
a gift of a friend of the Univer-
sity, prizes for essays are offered
to students who are candidates
for the bachelor's or master's de-
grees in Business Administration
or Economics in the following
amounts: first prize, $250; second
prize, $150; and third prize, $100.
The subject of the essays is
"How Can Real Wages for Work-
ers of the United States Be In-
creased?" The essay or paper
should be addressed to a mass,
non - professional, non - academic,
audience such as the general run
of readers ofAmerican newspap-
ers, and its purpose is to clarify
fundamental economic relation-
ships or principles as they bear
upon the subject. The papers
should not be over 10 double-
spaced, typewritten pages in length
and they may be shorter.
The contest will be supervised
by, and the papers will be judged
by a committee consisting of Pro-
fessors William Palmer, Charles
N. Davisson and C. E. Griffin,
chairman. The selection of papers
for prizes will be on the basis of
the Committee's judgment ofasi. -
cess in attaining the stated ob-
jectives. Manuscripts must be
typewritten, double-spaced, and
submitted before May 1, 1947, to
,Mrs. Hile, Assistant to the Dean,
108 Tappan Hall. The author's
name should not appear on the
manuscript itself, but should be
placed on a separate sheet that
will be detached before the paper
is read by the Committee. Awards
will be announced on or before
June 1, 1947.
The Committee reserves the
right to award no prizes or fewer
than three if in its judgment the
number of quality of papers is
inadequate.
Elizabeth Sargent Lee Medical
History Prize: Established in 1939
by bequest of Prof. Alfred O. Lee,
a member of the faculty of the
University from 1908 until his
death in 1938. The income from
the bequest is td be awarded an-
nually to a junior or senior pre-
medical student in the College of
Literature, Science and the Arts
for writing the best essay on some
topic concerning the history of
medicine. Freshmen in the Medi-
cal School who are on the Com-
bined Curriculum in Letters and
Medicine are eligible to compete
in the contest.
The following committee has
been appointed to judge the con-
test: Assist.ant Professor john
Arthos, Chairman, Prof. A. A,
Christman, and Assistant Profs-
sor F. H. Test.
The committee has announced

the following topics for the con-
test:
1. Iistory of a Military Medical
Unit.
2. Medical-Aid Man.
3. Medicine in Industry.
4. Tropical Medicine.
5. Any other topic accepted by
the Committee.
Prospective contestants may
consult committee members by ap-
pointment.
1) A first prize of $75 and a
second prize of $50 is being offer-
ed.
2) Manuscripts should be 3,-
000 to 5,000 words in length.
(3 The maniscripts should be
typed. doubl,, spaced, (,n pne side
of the paper only.
4) Contestants must submit
two copies of their manuscripts.
(5) All manuscripts should be
handed in at Rm. 1220, Angell
Hall by May 1.

University Community Center:
1045 Midway Boulevard, Willow
Run Village:
Friday., March 7: 8 p.m. Inter-
denominational Church Lenten
Service; 8 p.m. Duplicate Bridge
in Study Room; 8:30 p.m., Party

ectures
University Lecture: D,
Smith, Merton Professor
lish Literature, Uniyersity
ford, will lecture on the s
"Shakespeace Criticism, O
New." at 4:15 p.m., Thurs.,
13, Kellogg Auditorium,
Building: auspices of the I
ment of English.
University Lecture: Mr
DeFrancis, United States I
ment of State, will lecture
subject, "The Political C
versy over Language Refc
China," at 4:15 pjn., Tues.,
18, Rackham AmphitheatrE
pices of the Department of
tal Languages and Literatt
(ont inued on Page 4)

BOX OFFICE OPENS TODAY - 10:00 AM.
"THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO"
Mo a/'s omi( opera /' d by tht, ' he Dept. of Speech in conjunction
wi/h the hl f Music and the Uniucrsit y Orchcstr4
Tickets $1.20 - 90c - 60c (tax inc.)
Box Office Hours: 10-5 ... Phone .3.0
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
DANCE TO"NIGHT!
Helen and Eddie Present
MACK FERGUSON SI NGTET
"with Mack at the piano"
at the ARMORY
ADMISSION 75c 9-12 P.M.
liAem1th4,4iI 9j1u*e kat Club&~
PRESENTS THE 5th ANNOAL WINTER CARNIVAL
"MELODY ON ICE
ARRANGED AND DIRECTED BY
OuTSTANDING STARS OF THE MID-WEST
BEAUTIFULLY COSTUMED
COMIC AND SPECTACULAR SKATING
CAST OF OvER 100
AT THEMICHIGAN RINK
SUNDAY AND MONDAY, MARCI 9 AND 10
Tickets at Union, Wahr's, Slaters and the Rink

bridge and dancing ip. Nu
Saturday, March 8: 6 p.m
Luck Supper. For reserva
call 3120, extension 29; 8
Square Dancing, led by Mr
Mrs. David Palmer.
Sunday, March 9: 3-5 p.mr
for graduate students and
wives.
Wednesday, March 12: 8
U. of M. Glee Club at West

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

I

I

JACK HALEY. ANNE

JEFFREYS

LOST AND FOUND

I-

---- -7,7-711111111

A Also

I-

KEYSTONE HOTEL
GERMANY TODAY
WORLD NEWS

A

-- Coming Sunday -
JAMES STEWART
'IT'S A
WONDERFUL LIFE'

J

Sprin ji6 u61 around
t~hecornler"
SUITS . in a variety of jacket lengths
are so wearable. Let Marguerite design
a suit-for your figure.

LOST: Red Wallet containing money
and driver's license. Initials E.C.K.
in corner. Finder please call 4121,
Ext. 456. E. Kimball. )20
,OST: Substantial Reward for return
of Longine Wrist Watch lost Sun-
day, Mar. 2, in State Theater or vi-
cinity. Call 8138 after 5 p.m. )3
I WANT my wallet back. There was
about $15-20.00 dollars in it! I'll
raise the ante to an even $25.00, but
please return the leather and the
papers. Richard R. Stofflett, Box 17,
Mich. Daily. ) 56
LOST: Monday, between Glen Avenue
and Angell Hall, a lady's brown
leather billfold containing around
$40 and stamps from Ration Book
No. 4. Finder please call 2-5266. Re-
ward. )11
BLUE BELT: Coat useless without it.
Taken from League, Feb. 14th. Call
4121, Ext. 2147. )61
LOST: Gruen Wrist Watch with gold
strap, Sun'day evening. Reward. Paul
Taggett, West Lodge, Ypsi. 9161. )2
YOU'RE WELCOME to my right arm if
you return the ducat to the West
Quadrangle's Spring Fantasy at the
Union, April 18. 418 Williams, 2-4401.
)11.
REWARD: for girl's navy blue gabar-
dine ski pants. Lost in Union base-
ment. Call 9158, Doretta Schwartz.
)55
LOST: Brown Sheaffer Lifetime Pen
engraved "E. F. Cross" on 9:00 A.M.
Willow Run Bus, 4 March. If found,
please notify E. F. Cross, 1348 Oak-
ham Ct., Willow Run. Reward! )54
LOST: Wallet containing checks, cash,
and papers. $10.00 Reward. Call
Peter Storer 2-4401.
Hold Those War Bonds

MISCELLANEOUS
PHOTOSTATIC Copying, Enlargements
or Reductions. Leave your work at
Wikel Drug, Calkins-Fletcher, Pur-
chase Camera, Card and Camera,
marriage and birth certificates, dis-
charges, records. 24-hour pick-up
serivec. Technical Photo Service, 917
Sunnyside, Phone 4559, 2-6958. )53

'AND THE NIGHT shall be filled with,
Music." That is, if your radio works
- O.K. If not, call 9241 or leave it at
The Tavern Cafeteria for quick re-
pair service. I am Fred, Ze Great
Radio Man. )62
MALE STUDENT, child counseling ex-
perience, excellent references, form-
erly diplomatic service, desires po-
sition caring for children of family
afternoons, evenings, exchange pri-
vate room, breakfast. Box 23 Michi-
gan Daily. )50
TAILORING and SEWING
DRESSMAKING and alterations, also
teacher of sewing. Miss Livingston
315 S. Division, second floor front.
)33
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Single Room near League.
Suitable for student or business girl.
Write Box 18. )51
TYPEWRITERS NOW AVAILABLE for
rent. Standards or portables. Office
Equipment Service Co., 111 S. Fourth
Avenue. )36
ROOM FOR TWO University students
in triple room. 428 Hamilton. )63
BUSINESS SERVICES
NOW: Your typing needs will receive
immediate attention.eNo waiting for
your turn. State Steno Service, Hill
and State Streets. Phone 9502. )52
ELECTROLUX VACUUM CLEANERS
Sales - JOHN JADWIN - Service.
855 Tappan Ave., Phone 2-7412. )10

WANTED TO BUY
35MM or Small Folding Camera, reason-
ably priced. Cal 2-2012 after 7:30 P.M.
or write Dovelas Sargent, 1700 Fen-
wood. ) 7
FOR SALE
GERMAN Wehrmacht radio transceiver
with 2-volt D.C., 120-volt A.C. power.
pack and supplies; new P-38 Luger;
gauleiter armbands; other souvenirs.
Call 4145, Room P-32. )65
ARMY-NAVY Surplus Goods, many
items. Come in and look around.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14
FUR COAT: Hudson Seal, Size 16-18,
Also a velvet formal and jacket, size
16-18. 1402 Washington Heights or
call 9049. )1.
DETROLA Portable, Electric Radio, new
tubes, $25. Remington Threesome
Electric Shaver, $10. Call Mr. Gold-
man, L-15, 4145. )64
35 MM. CANDID CAMERA, 2.8 lens,
speeds from 1/10-1/1250. Built-in
range-finder and exposure meter.
Phone 2-4401, 106 Allen-Rumsey, after
7:30 p.m. )15
BABY GRAND piano. Walnut case. Like
new. Reasonable. Ph. 24789. )24

WANTED

THERE'S A FUTURE for women in the
telephone business. If you're look-
ing for an interesting, well-paying
job that has a future, come to see

, t.

1352 WILMOT ;Alterations
Telephone 3906 Hours: 9:00 to 5:00
EN6ING

us now. We will
will answer all
cheerfully. Apply,
ton.

welcome you and
your questIons
323 E. Washing.
)5

ati-A

WANTED: Typing. Call Mrs. Joseph
Devlin at 25-8077. Prompt and effi-
cient service. )35

ICI IAN

SATURDAY

di

CRIME BORN
OF FIERCE
LOVE

11

THE FARM CUPBOARD
Specializing in FRIED CHICKEN DINNERS
Open 11:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. including Sundays.
5400 Plymouth Road (on the way to Detroit) Phone 9387

.; : .w

, :.

::

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