100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 15, 1946 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIX

'rH141 4 M~HI A AN IIY

SATURDAY, I

_:...
a..I.lll6A.! .C:A.ATIIP F] . .IILIII.A Jk
f .. ..

Camtpus Talent
Makes Musical
Record Debut
Greek 1etter Groi>s
Perforii for Posterity
Local talent got a boost yesterday
when a mobile recording company
called on various campus fraternities
and sororitics anid made records of
their songs and outstanding solo per-
formers.
Contacted by Johnny Boyle, direc-
tor of the company, members of Sig-
ma Chi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Phi
Delta Theta, Kappa Alpha Theta, Al-
pha Chi Omega, and Pi Beta Phi
made permanent souvenirs of their
Greek letter days. Dr. Hardin Van
Deursen's choir was also given a
chance to perform before the micro-
phone and a minute later hear them-
selves sing.
At the Sigma Chi louse, several re-
cordings were made of Jim Evans and
Nando Gutierrez, pianists, and Bob
Howland, clarinetist. Recordings were
also madle of Howland with Dick
Johnson, pianist, acclaimed by Boyle
as one of the top performers in tlh
field.
Boyle, who started making record-
ings in 1936 when a student at the
University of Illinois, has carried on
his work at 87 universities since that
time. When he discovers special tal-
ent, he tries to play it up and help
the student break into the profes-
sional field.
Ross W ill Give
Violin Concert
Gilbert Ros head of the depart-
ment of stringed instruments in the
School of Music, will give a violin re-
cital at 8:30 p.m. unday in the Lydia
Mendelssolmi Twatre.
Included on t he program will be
works by Caporale, an 18th century
Italian iaster, Handel, Beethoven,
Chausson, and Ross Lee Finney. The
work of Finney, an American com-
poser who is professor of composition
at Smith College, will be a first per-
formance.

ON ITOLICE- FORCE -----
Jap Women Enter Public Affairs

By I'HYLLIS KAYE
"The fact that Japanese women are
now allowed on the Tokyo police
force and that 75 women candidates
are up for election to the Japanese
Diet is not too surprising," Dr. Frank
L. Huntley of the policital science and
English departments stated yesterday.
Dr Huntley spent a number of years
in Japan teaching English at Kyoto
Imperial University.
The Japanese woman has occu-
pied a position of more power than
most Western people give her credit
for, he said. In feudal countries
women have been working side by
side with men for centuries. In
the United States women only be-
came active in industry recently.
The Western peoples consider it a
sign of emancipation for women to
do useful work outside of the home.
We are merely rediscovering a
fact of which many of the older na-
tions have never lost sight.
"Whereas," Dr. Huntley continued,
"the Japanese woman occupies an
inferior state according to social phil-
osophy, she really has influence and
wields power in the home. This is
natural in a country where the family
is the prime social unit."
Examples may be cited of the posi-
tion women have held in Japanese
life, he declared. First of all, Japa-
nese literature shows a singular con-
tribution by women. There were out-
standing female writers as far back
as the 9th and 10th centuries. In the
Western world, it wasn't until the
19th century that women started
writing very much, and then they
st rove to hid their sex by using mas-
culine names.
"Again," Dr. Huntley explained,
"the ,Japanese woman generally has
complete control of the family
budge t. Many an American woman
would give her eye-teeth for such.
domestic power."
The Japanese women, he said, have
gained some of their power by allow-
ing the men to think, in their superior
Rowau To Give
LecLu(res Today
"'tln7illorf M cra n " - U i

way, that they are the more impor-
tant sex, and by not constantly de-
manding emancipation. Quietly,
they have made many literary and
social contributions to their country.
Since the introduction of Western
industry, Japanese women have worn
trousers, worked in the factories, run
streetcars and done many such jobs.
They have worked for a few years
and then gotten married.
"However," Dr. Huntley added,
"the new element in all this is that
Japanese women are beginning to
look on their jobsras careers and
are coming into fields occupied
heretofore exclusively by men."
This .change, he stated, will bring
about a demand for better educational
facilities for women, since those al-
ready in existence lag way behind
the facilities for men.
On the whole, the Japanese woman
has differed from the Chinese wom-
an in that she is inordinately shy,
does not give the appearance of
emancipation, and has achieved her
personality by constant subjection
and denial.
Two exceptions to this rule are
Baroness Ishimoto, whose auto-
biography, Facing Two Ways, Dr.
Huntley recommended as healthy
reading for any American woman,
Saul son Will
Ldead Bike Hike
Trip Will Conlition
For Wcaek ii e }ostel
Stan Saulson will lead the Ameri-
can Youth Hostel "conditioning" bike
hike which will leave at 2 p.m. Sun-
day from Lane Hall and return at 5
p.m.
The following week-end, March
23-24, the hostel will sponsor, an
overnight bike trip to the Pinebrook
Farm Youth Hostel near South Lyon,
about fifteen miles from Ann Arbor.
Nancey Smith will act as leader. Ac-
tivities at the Hostel will include a
hayride, folk dancing and singing,
and horseback riding for those who
are interested. The group will leave.
at 3 p.m. Saturday, from Lane Hall
and will return" Sunday afternoon,
For reservations and further inform-
ation, interested persons should call
Nancey Smith, leader, at 7211.
While both trips are open to all
persons interested in biking, addi-
tional equipment including a sleep-
ing bag or blankets and eating uten-
sils are required for the overnight
trip. A hostel pass is required in or-
der to spend the night at the hostel.
Passes may be secured through the
leaders.
Prof. Slosson Attends
Cocerenc (it Rollins
Prof. Preston Slosson of the his-
tory department is attending an
Atomic Bomb Conference at Rollins
College, Winter Park, Fla. Ie will re-
turn Monday, March 18.

and Mme. Sugimoto, author of
Daughter of the Samurai.
"Therefore," Dr. Huntley conclud-
ed, "that the Japanese woman, who
has always been obsessed with the
idea of remaining in the background,
has decided to enter public life openly
is good for the whole Japanese peo-
ple."
Lutherans Will
Hold Regional
Conference
The University chapter of the
Lutheran Student Association will
act as host to the annual Ohio Valley
Lutheran Student Association re-
gional conference, which will be held
today, tomorrow and Sunday in Ann
Arbor.
Fifty delegates, representing 10
universities in Ontario, Ohio, Penn-
sylvania and Michigan, will attend
the conference.
Starting with registration of dele-
gates at 7 p.m. today in Zion Parish
Hall, the conference will include ad-
dresses by Prof. Paul G. Kauper, of
the Law School, and Dr. Edward C.
Fendt, of the systematic theology de-
partment at Capital University. Prof.
Kauper will speak on the "Plight of
Modern Man" at 8 p.m. today in Trin-
ity Lutheran Church. Dr. Fendt will
discuss "The Power of God" at 10
a.m. and again at 2 p.m. tomorrow in
the League.
Group discussions will take place at
10:45 a.m. and 2:45 p.m. tomorrow in
the League. At 3:45 p.m. an election
of regional officers will be held.
Contralto Will
Give Concert
Nadine E. Lindquist Flinders, con-
tralto, assisted by Marion Owen, pian-
ist, will present a recital at 8:30 p.m.,
Tuesday, in Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
ter.
An instructor in voice in the School
of Music, Mrs. Flinders received her
Master of Music degree at Eastman
School of Music. She came to the
University from the staff of North
Texas State Teachers College of
Denton, Texas.
New Army Policy
WASHINGTON, March 14-(/')-
The War Department said today that
overseas service no longer will be re-
quired of men whose families already
have suffered one death in the Army.
And when one or more immediate
members of a family have been killed
or died as a result of wounds, acci-
dents or disease connected with their
service, remaining members in service
will be stationed, upon their applica-
tion, in the United States at posts
nearest their homes.
The ruling also applies to families
who have a member classified as
missing in action.

:COLY:
Overpublicized
Music Therapy
Is Dangerous
By MARY BRUSH
"Grave danger" to progress in the
use of music therapy as treatment for
insanity was predicted yesterday by
Prof. Martha Colby, of the psychol-
ogy department, if the work in this
field is over-publicized and attempt-
ed by improperly qualified people.
"The danger is that people will
regard this as an independent ther-
apy," Prof. Colby said, pointing out
that it can only be used effectively
in cooperation with highly skilled
scientists and musicians who are fa-
miliar with the whole background
of "pure" or laboratory research.
There is a prolific but very technical
literature in this field, she said.
"What is needed at the moment is
more of this type of work, carried on
under carefully controlled conditions,
over a long period of time," Dr. Colby
explained. Though there has been
very little support for this work in
the past, she noted that Michigan
State College last summer instituted
a specificaly designed training pro-
gram in the field,
Dr. Colby pointed out that two for-
mer students here, trained in physics,
physiology, psychology and music are
now doing interesting theraputic
work in connection with war casual-
ties.
"Psychological and physiological
responses to sound patterns are very
generalized, including the whole or-
ganism, so that music therapy might
logically arouse any patterns of past
experience with which they have
been connected," she explained. "The
music pattern must be very skillfully
selected for the individual case."

Campus Highlights

Owen Open House ...
Robert Owen Cooperative House,
1017 Oakland, will hold its open
house tonight from 8 p.m. to mid-
night.
The house will be open for inspec-
tion from top to bottom, refresh-
ments will be served, and there will
be singing, dancing and games.
Everyone'is welcome.
. M
6"Wild Open House. . .
Following a Bible class led by Dr.
W. P. Lemon at 7:30 p.m. today,
the Presbyterian Guild wil hold
open house from 8:30 to 12 p.m.
SRA Coffee Hour . . .
Dr. Edward W. Blakeman, Counse-
lor in Religious Education, and Mrs.
Blakeman will be guests of honor at
the Student Religious Association
Coffee Hour at 4:30 p.m. today in the
Lane Hall Library.
Progressive Supper . ..

sive supper with courses served at
the homes of several Guild mem-
bers, followed by coffee in the
Guild house.

Hillel Mixer . .

The B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
will hold a Purim Party as its first
Spring Term mixer at 9 p.m. tomor-
row at the Foundation.
In line with one of the traditions
of Purim, the Feast of Esther, "ham-
antashun" will be served at the
party. The Hillel Players will pro-
vide entertainment and there will
be dancing.
Fursten berg To Leave ...
Dean A. C. Furstenberg of the
Medical School leaves today for
Dallas, Texas where he will be
guest speaker on the spring pro-
gram of the Dallas Southern Clini.
cal Society.
lIe will return March 23.
Theta Open H us . . .

Kappa Alpha Theta will hold open
Starting at the Baptist Guild house for veterans on campus from
house at 6 p.m. today, Baptist 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday at 1414 Washte-
Guild members will have a progres- naw.
'"'1nI1J-mFil1Jn1hnTL~fl FLLL f1FI fi l IlL fr

"There is nothing new in the
of music therapy," she said. "It
old as primitive man, and was
in magic and healing rites, but
non-scientific manner."

idea
is as
used
in a

NEW SPRING ARRIVALS
Chomp Hats $6.50 & $7.50
KUOHN'S
CLOTHES SHOP
122 LASr LIBiRrY

M I Idd-tIA Uf Vozmigration, a Un -
versity lecture, will be given by Dr.
William Rowan at 4:15 today in the
tackham Amphitheatre.
Dr. Rowan, noted experimenter in
migration, will also speak on "The
Future of Humanity from the Biolo-
gist's Viewpoint" before Sigma Xi
at 8 p.m. today in the Natural Sci-
ence Auditorium.
Widely traveled both in Europe and
North America, Dr. Rowan was
founder of the zoology department at
the University of Edmonton, which
lie heads today. He also has conduct-
ed extensive lecture tours on the
sub.ject of migration.
Many of his photographs, models
of wild animals and art works have
been displayed in American, Canad-
ian and English museums. As a writ-
er he is credited with the book "The
Riddles of Migration" and several
papers and short stories.

Honor Society
Elects Officers
Richard J. Broadman was elected
president of Tau Beta Pi, engineering
honor fraternity, at a meeting last
week.
Other officers elected were: Borge
Orberg, vice-president; W. R. Ayl-
ward, corresponding secretary; J. A.
Richardson, recording secretary; D.
E. Foringer, cataloguer; and E. A.
Fradenburgh, respresentative to En-
gineering Council.
Heads of committees elected were:
R. Johnson, member committee;
Borge Orberg, program committee;
R. A. Shields, publicty committee;
John Dmitric, social committee; Don
De Graef, initiation committee; and
Jay Johnson, finance committee.
Body of Cardinal is
IBroiught to St. Loutis

H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H

UIN ION I "
B A Is1 NUET

N

12:30 Saturday Noon I
Are you interested in being part of the most popular
and effective student organization on campus?

Sin up NOW for the Union Staff
at the Union Student Offices
The Union Staff has positions for INDUSTRIOUS,
RESPONSIBLE and ENTHUSIASTIC University men.
Find your place on a
"Union Committee"
(a) CAMPUS AFFAIRS: Work pertaining to the Union
in relation to the entire campus.
.(b)SOCIAL: In complete charge of social events
involving the Union.
(c) Administration: Supervises and handles the man-
agement of the Union student offices.
(d) HOUSE: Responsible for activities centered within
the Union.
(e) PUBLICITY: Control of keeping the Union before
the student body.
Come to the 'BIG BANQUET"
YOU'RE INVITED!

9
9
9
9
9
9
F-i

I

9
9
9
9
4
9
-Fl
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
LI

111

W ..

=VIII

1

NNWAI

ALUMNI

ASSOCIATION

OF MICHIGAN CHAPTER OF
TRIfNCLE
FRf4TERNITY,
Desires to COntaCt all members of any
Chapter ,of the fraternity who are

SEVEN GoOD REASONS
TO STOP AND SHOP
1 Ideally located for veterans of Willow Run
2. Large parking space
3. Choice meats - plenty of pork and bacon

SM0A !I A LBoUMS
INFINITE VARIETY IN SMALL SPACE
A partial Listing from our Extensive Stock of Small Albums:

ST. LOUIS, March 14--(AP)-Thou-
sands of persons with bared heads
lined the streets today as the body
of John Cardinal Glennon, beloved
83-year old leader of the St. Louis
Catholic Archdiocese, was brought
home to his final resting place, the
beautiful St. Louis Cathedral,

4. Fresh fruits and Vegetables
5. Groceries
6. Soft Drinks
7. Newspapers and Magazines

now enrolled at the
University
Phone 2-1494

£eAeT £ eA LuperIlArket
EAST MICHIGAN- YPSIlANTI

BING CROSBY
Crosby Classics
Going My Way
Holiday Inn
Bells of St. Mary's
Don't Fence Me In
MAREK WEBER
In Old Vienna
Light Opera
Schubert Melodies
XAVIER CUGAT
Rhumba with Cugat
Conga with Cugat
Cugat's Favorite Rhumbas
Tangos
WARING'S PENNSYLVANIANS
Songs of Devotion
Pleasure Time
GOLDMAN'S BAND
Forward March
March Time
Famous American Marches
EDDIE DUCHIN
Duchin Plays Gershwin
Eddie Duchin Reminisces
JOE REICHMAN
MILLS BROTHERS
BURL IVES

CARMEN CAVALLARO
Strauss Waltzes
Getting Sentimental
I'll See You In My Dreams
Serenade
BOOGIE WOOGIE
Ammons and Johnson
Freddy Slack
Meade Lux Lewis
Basie, James, et al.
BARBER SHOP BALLADS
Yale Glee Club
Benny Goodman Sextet
Fats Waller
Tommy Dorsey
King Cole Trio
History of Jazz (4 Vols.)
Danny Kaye
MUSICAL SHOWS
Oklahoma
Meet Me in St. Louis
Bloomer Girl
State Fair
On the Town
Harvey Girls
Showboat
Polonaise
FRANK SINATRA
MORTON GOULD

'I,

ILI

A

p

I

___. _

TONIGHT at 8:30
GUTHRIE McCLINTIC

Noted Broadway Director and Producer

"THE THEATRE: REMINISCENCES AND PREDICTIONS"

These are but a few of the hundreds of small albums
always in stock at the

!1 1 1 1 116 1 2 1111
; TICKELTS $1,20, 90c, 60c (tax included)

E

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan