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June 06, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-06-06

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PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JUNE 6, 1946

Truman Urges Bargaining To Avert Shipping
Strike, Ternms Federal Steps 'Preeautionary'

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, June 5-President
Truman stepped into the maritime
dispute tonight telling both sides

The June issue of 'Insight" will
be on sale on campus for the last
time today.
Leading articles in the latest is-
sue of "The Magazine of Student
Concern" include: "Negroes First-
Americans Second," "This is Willow
Village," "Hollywood Hokum," and
"Fraternities and Sororities, Pro and
Con."
After the campus sale today, copies
of 'Insight' may be purchased at the
Student Religious Association.

to "buckle down and settle this mat-
ter through collective bargaining."
ie emphasized a belief that the
nation-wide CIO shipping strike set
for-June 15 could be averted by such
bargaining, and stressed that gov-
ernment steps to keep the ships
running are "purely reactionary."
Government Control
His statement was a followup to
his news conference comments last
Friday in which he pledged that the
government would work, the ves-
sels if the strike materializes.
New peace offers had come from
both sides earlier in the day. The
government at the same time drafted
a priority list for vital cargoes in
case of the strike.
Priorities for Shipping
The government will not try to,
keep all U.S. ships running if the
strike occurs, a high official told
reporters privately. It is taking steps

to see that the most essential food
and other cargoes move.
With the strike deadline ten days
off, one maritime union president
said "we're still quite a ways apart"
on setlement.
The big CIO National Maritime
Union receded anew, however, from
its demand for a 40-hour work week,
key issue of the whole controversy. It
was believed, but not confirmed, that
President Joseph Curran had gone up
to 44 hours.
* * *
JAW Hoard Protests
CLEVELAND, June 5--P)-The
CIO United Automobile Workers
executive board late today called
President Truman the "number one
strikebreaker of America" for his
method in attempting to prevent
the maritime strike.

CLASSIFIED AVEIL SING

$10 REWARD: Now that you have
used my red Liberty bike for 2
weeks, please return it, Allene Go-
lenkin, Stockwell. (27
LOST: Monday. Navy wallet. Gach's
Picture Shop. Finder please. return
contents to Lynn Shapiro, 1308 E.
Ann. (2
LOST: Small portable R.C.A. radio.
Lost Saturday at Clarks. Call Jean
Gaffney, 2-2543. Reward. (13
LOST: Somebody traded raincoats
with me at the Deutscher Verein
dance. Call Bob, 9888. (12
LOST: Maroon Schaeffer pen on
campus or at Stockwell. Reward.
Call Lois 2-4471, Room 2539. (11
WALLET lost Memorial Day in Ar-
boretum. Reward. Call Guy Bor-
den, 5348. (7
LOST: Chi Omega pin with name
Florence MAfurray on back, between
E. University and Washtenaw on
Willard. Reward! Call Nancy 2-
1146. (9
LOST: Pi Beta Phi pin, May 29.
Engraved "Dorothy Eycleshymer".
Sentimental value. Finder call 2-
4514. Reward. (24
WANTED
WOULD like ride to Lake Tahoe,
Calif., or vicinity, on or after June
19. Share expenses. ' Call room
4016, Stockwell. (22
WANTED: Girl's bicycle with shift,
in good condition. July or sooner.
Call 3185. (3

WANTED: Girl's 3-speed Schwinn,
Rawleigh touring bicycle before the
15th. Evelyn Denton, 2-1938. 6:30-
9:00 p.m. (17
LUGGAGE WANTED: Three piece
set or single pieces. Box 63. (30
PASSENGERS WANTED to Cali-
fornia. 1941 Chevrolet leaving Sat-
urday, June 8. Phone 2-2317.
MIDWAY Bicycle Shop, 322 E. Lib-
erty. We have rebuilt used bikes
for sale. Your bike can be expertly
repaired also.
WANTED TO RENT
HIGHEST PRICE! Paid for a one or
two room furnished apartment.
Lease of two or more years re-
quired. Occupancy at earliest con-
venience. Best references. Care
given property. Call Kashmiry 2-
5553. (28
A RECORD! Up to $250 per month
for a furnished house up to 6 (min-
imum of 4 required) bed rooms.
Wanted by a family at earliest
convenience for a lease of more
than 2 years. No children. Best
references. Call A. Aly, 2-5553. (1
TEACHER in Ann Arbor public
schools desperately needs small
apartment for two. Will take it
anytime before September 1.Con-
tact O. D. Miller, 404 Mich. House,
West Quad., Ann Arbor, Mich. (16
HELP WANTED
MEN for part time work on farm,
preferably with farm background
and experience. Laboratory orch-
ard, 1831 Traver Road. Phone 8023.
(10
PRINTING
PROGRAMS * CARDS * STATIONERY
HANDBILLS, ETC.
Downtown: 308 NoRTH MAIN
ATHENS PRESS

WANTED: Limited number of ener-
getic young men for summer em-
ployment. Big money, travel, and
educational opportunities. See
Coach Cliff Keen, Room 304, Mich-
igan Union, at 4 p.m., Friday, June
7. (18 ,
HELP WANTED: Male drug clerk,
full or part time, experience pre-
ferred. Top pay. Apply Witham
Drug Company in person only.
FOR RENT
A FEW rooms still available for sum-
mer session in Washtenaw fratern-
ity house. Call Ypsi 2808W3. (25
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Naval officer's bridge
coat, size 38 small. Practically
new. Inquire at 523 N. Main, Apt.
1. Evenings. (23
FOR SALE: Lynx fur coat. Size 14.
Very cheap as it is quite worn.
Phone 4143, ext. 38. (26
FOR SALE: Complete set of trap
drums; tom-toms, high-hat, every-
thing a "Hide-Beater" needs. Call
Bill Lambert, 2-4551. (19
FOR SALE: Size 39 tuxedo; size 40,
men's summer formal; size 38, sum-
mer suit, 2 pair trousers. Tel. 2-
1033. (20
CLARINET: 1942. Pruefer Profes-
sional Wooden model. Phone 2-
2035 after 6 p.m. (21
PLATINUM cuff links, Elgin watch
and chain. Man's topcoat, size 38,
hat 7%. Ladies suit 16-18, good
condition, rear ap't, 324 Thompson
St. 2-6294. (14
MISCELLANEOUS
CO-OP summer personnel interviews
for interested students will be held
at the Union, Saturday at 2 p.m. (8
DESIRE TO EXCHANGE furnished
$35 apartment ideal for student
couple for larger one with bed-
room to make way for infant. Call
2-2483. (5
HILDEGARDE SEWING SHOP, 116
E. Huron. Let us make your drapes,
alterations, and custom made
clothes! Phone 2-4669.
MEN'S Used Clothing Wanted. Best
prices paid. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington.

FILED SUIT -- James J. Regan,
Jr., a Philadelphia lawyer who has
filed a taxpayer's suit in Washing-
ton seeking to block use of naval
vessels in the Bikini atom bomb
tests, set for July 1.
ProURte. . .
(Continued from Page 1)
the County Probate Court's "under-
standings." There is no legal maxi-
mumi on the time children may be
held in the Detention Home. They
spend an average of two weeks there,
Judge Pray said, "sometimes as much
as three months."
In an investigation of the home, re-
ported yesterday, Te Diy fon
that children held there are locked
in narrow bare rooms with only sec-
ondhand books to break the monot-
o ny
Asked for a description of proba-
tion procedure in this county, Judge
Pray said children on probation re-
port every month and that in each
case the Assistant County Agent goes
out to their homes.
. J
Mrs. Aa eit mes, wo hod
a doctoral degree from the L03 An-
geles College of Osteopathic Phy-
sicians and Surgeons. Mrs. Ames
told The Daily tht she has taught
elementary school through ninth
grade and is also a "wife and
mother." "Those are my qualifica-
tions," she said.
Arch D. Wilson, County Agent as-
sisting the Probate Court, has said
"20 years experience," the "best
training there is," Judge Pray said
when asked Wilson's formal quali-
fications.
At the Detention Home, Julia De-
maree, the attendant, described her
training as that of a "practical
nurse."
The National Probation Associ-
ation prescribes a "college graduate
who has had special training in
psychology, education and group
work" as qualifications for deten-
tion home supervisor.
Asked what preventive measures
are taken with children who have
come under the court's jurisdiction,
Judge Pray said he talks to them
and their parents. Social workers
from state agencies are consulted in
"not more than 10 per cent" of the
cases, he said.
"One in 20 repeat," eJudge Pray:
to home conditions. "We try to get
them into good homes," he said,
naming Willow Run and Horseshoe
and Whitmore lakes as areas in the
county where poor home conditions
are responsible for many child of-
fenders.
Commenting on the county's De-
tention Home, Judge Pray said
that it would be better if the county

had a separate, larger home, but
that such facilities would be "aw-
fully expensive.
Michigan State Laws Relating to
Juveniles (1944) place responsibility
for juvenile correction on county
boards of supervisors and probate
courts.
"Provision may be made by the
board of supervisors in each county
for the temporary detention of child-
ren to be conducted as an agency
of the court," and "The judge may
appoint a superintendent or matron
and other necessary employees for
such a home who shall receive such
compensation as shall be provided
by the board of supervisors of such
county," the law states.
Tomorrow: Complacency blocks
reform.
ot ,
o Dine in the Charming
Early American Atmosphere
of
THE COLONIAL 1{OOM
Specializing
Steaks - Chicken-- Sea Food

Voters Blamed
For Juvenile
Deliiiquei. iCare
Prof. Carr Charges
Neglect of Probleul
(Continued from Page 1)
program to relieve the utter inade-
quacy of our provisions for dealing
with juvenile delinquency, the so-
ciologist declared. To reform the
county boards one by one would take
forever.
(In Washington, Attorney General
Clark said Tuesday that the govern-
ment was mobilizing public and pri-
vate forces to "forestall the greatest
juvenile crime wave in the nation's
history," according to the Associated
Press.)
Local Taxes Too Low
The problem in Washtenaw Coun-
ty is in the tax situation, Prof. Carr
said. The tax base isn't large enough
to set up a decent detention home
for such a small number of children,
and he does not think that there is
any likelihood of such an improve-
ment being made here. In smaller
counties the problem is even more
acute, he pointed out.
"One answer to this problem would
be in the establishment of regional
detention homes," Prof. Carr stated,
"but this is not a practical solu-
tion now. The best immediate solu-
tion would be to take the children in
to the Wayne County Detention
Home, but here again the voter
would probably object to the ex-
pense. Another difficulty is that the
better the detention home, the great-
er is the tendency to use it as a
correctional institution. It mightj
conceivably be possible to utilize
various security measures in selected
private homes."
Capable Staff Needed
It would help a great deal to have
people as supervisors who have some
background in the kind of work they
are trying to do, Prof. Carr said. The
children should not only be given an
adequate physical examination, but
also psychiatric and psychological
tests, and the background of the child
should be more thoroughly investi-
gated.

NEW YORK, June 5-P) The
United Nations Security Council to-
night appeared to be headed tcward
another bitter fight as it became
clear that Russia. Great Britain and
the United States would refuse to
accept the report of the Council's
sub-committee on Spain in its pre-
sent form.
An authorized Soviet spokesman
indicated that when the report comes
before the Council at 3 p.m. EDT)
tomorrow Soviet Delegate Andrei A.,
Gromyko would be prepried to ob-
ject strenuously to two major points.
While the spokesman would not
comment on ports that Russia
might veto acceptance of the report,
some delegates saw the Soviet atti-
tude as opening the way for a possible
veto.
Neither the United States nor the
British delegations had received in-
structions from their governments
this afternoon, but spokesmen for
both groups said it couid be safely
assumed that they would object to

Report on Spain Heads U.N.
Secuiity Council for Dispute
Refusal by lHnis ia, U.S., reat Britain
j Seen; So-6"ie coTVeormedPossible

some of the sub-committee's
clusions.
The sub-committee report,

con-

culated Saturday after a month's
investigation of Poland's charges that
the Franco regime is a threat to world
peace. concluded that the Spanish
government was not an actual threat
at present but only a "potential
threat."
It recommended that the case be
referred to the 51-nation General
Assembly with a request that the As-
sembly call for a worldwide break of
diplomatic relations with Spain un-
less the Franco regime is "with-
drawn" by September.
PeruDenftistT
Toir T' Clinic
Dr. Herrera Visits
American Schools
Dr. Jose Santos Herrera, professor
of orthodontia in the School of Medi-
cine, University of San Marcos, Li-
ma, Peru, will visit the University
Dental School Monday as part of a
three-month tour of dental schools
and clinics in this country taken at
the invitation of the Department of
Shate.
Dr. Santos Herrera is founder of the
Peruvian Academy of Entomology. As
head of the Public Health Committee
of the Academy, for many years he
has been a leader in the movement
to develop the public health pro-
gram in his country in relation to
dental assistance. Dr. Herrera has
made studies of dental health centers
in Chile and Argentina, and is the
author of numerous publications in
the field of dentistry

Win Ford Award,
Winners of the Eleanor Clay Ford
Award, granted yearly to outstanding
women debaters, were Betty Lou Bid-
well, Harriet Risk and Mary Battle, it
was announced yesterday at the final
meeting of the Graduate Study Club.
Mary Battle, Howard Cole, Joseph
Crafton and Harriet Risk were in-
vited to be members of Delta Sigma
Rho, honorary speech society.

Continuous
Daily
from 1 P.M.

,rr ra s+r

Weekdays
30c to 5 P.M.

STARTING TODAY
TOO LOVELY FOR MURDER?
, - , ' f M:

UE 1TH
- Last Day Today --
THEY WERE EXPENDABLE
with Robert Montgomery
____- and
Laurel and Hardy Featurette
-- Friday and Saturday --
COL. EFFINGHAM'S RAID
with Joan Bennett
-+--- and
LIVE WIRES
with East Side Kids

VERA
Extra Added
MOUSIE
COMES HOME

TIN PAN
ALLEY TEMPOS

I

WORLD
NEWS

I

Coming Sunday!

"TANG IER"

aaE

TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Rented l
Repaired
STUDENT= and
OFFICE SUPPLIES
O. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

I

1

I

.:.

N '0 AMA'
~K
A L EDWARD EVERETT HORTON " JUIE BISHOP - WILLIAM PRINCE
SZ.SAK DIRECTED B BUSBY BERKELEY SROMN STY BY i1E
Also Extra
"MICHIGAN SKI-DADDLE"® BUGS BUNNY CARTOON
Sport "Hare Raising Hare"
Sunday - CROSBY - HOPE in "ROAD TO UTOPIA"

June Issue Now On Sale
WHAT STUDENTS ARE SAYING ABOUT:
PETITT'S ARTICLE ON RACIAL DISCRIMINATION:
"A realistic presentation of racial discrimination in Ann Arbor - with which
most students are unfamiliar. We must realize that the Negro problem does not exist
in a vacuum by itself." -Mat Chernotsky, Pres. of MYDA
"Petitt's article on racism on the campus is highly informative on a factor too
well-known by all the U. of M. students. But, such articles will not do Insight any good
if it is to succeed as a magazine. The University is a place where people earn degrees,

wmwm

North Main Opposite Court House
TODAY and FRIDAY
Brenda Marshall
in
"STRANGE IMPERSONATION"
plus
Johnny Mack Brown
in
"DESERT PHANTOM"

not where they are educated about races."

-A Negro student

l

A r
JQIN THE CROWD, take the ALL-STUDENT SPECIAL TRAIN to BUFFALO
and all points east to New York City. BOSTON travelers, sign up for the
Boston coach and enjoy the ride while you and your belongings are switched
to the Boston train at Albany.
. NO FIGH TING FOR SEATS
NO CHANGING OF TRAINS
A TRAIN FOR MICHIGAN STUDENTS ONLY
A one dollar deposit made NOW guarantees a pleasant trip home. Your
ticket will be available later at this State Street office. Baggage may be
checked.

THE PRO AND CON OF FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES:
"There is truth in many of the accusations in Miss Howell's article. However, it
cannot be taken as describing a general picture of the sorority system. Sororities are
aware of their inadequacies. This is the first step toward improvement. They must
go further in eliminating existing evils. --Marian Johnson, Pres. of Panhel
"THIS IS WILLOW VILLAGE" BY LOW ORLIN
"The article is a very objective and accurate presentation of Willow Run. If any-
thing, the inconvenienre of the place is minimized." --Larry H. Hilton, a Willow Villager
"I do not necessarily agree that the vets at Willow Run feel as left out of social
activities on campus as the article leads one to believe. However, I would like to see
an improved bus schedule between the village and campus to help balance their limited
time." -Rob rt D. Frost, a vet
THE MAGAZINE AS A WHOLE
"The June issue of Insight shows distinct improvement. Fine article on Negroes
on campus." -Hale Cham pion

"Insight is the campus substitute for DDT."

-Perry Logan

II "The articles in Insight hit the surface too much. They could be more provocative.

11

II

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