100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 05, 1946 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"""a "" THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5, 1946

of 4 ty.ixgan Baty
Fifty-Sixth Year

f

I

Cetn tr'oersial gep'tei'

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I.

i

Kdited and managed by students of the University of
Michigan under the authority of the Board in Control
Ef Student Publications.
Editor ial Staffj

Margaret Farmer
Hale Champion
Robert Goldman
Emily E. Knapp
Pat Cameron
Clark Baker .
Des Howarth
Ann Schutz..
Dona Guimaraes

Managing Editor
. . . . . . Editorial Director
, . . . . . . . . . City Editor
. . . . . . . Associate Editor
. . . Associate Editor
.. . . . . Sports Editor
. . ....Associate Sports Editor
. Women's Editor
Associate Women's Editor

Business Staff
Dorothy Flint . . . . Business Manager
Joy Altman . . . . . . Associate Business Manager
Evelyn Mills . . . . . Associate Business Manager
Telephone 23-24-1
Member of The Associated Press
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for re-publication of all news dispatches credited to it or
otherwise credited in this newpaper. All rights of re-
publication of all other matters herein also reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second-class mail matter.
Subscription during the regular school year by car-
rier, $4.50, by mail, $5.25.
REFRESeNTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTIING Y
National Advertising Service, Inc.
College Publishers Representative
420 MADISON AVE. "NEW YORK. N.Y.
CHICAGO * BOSTON . LOS ANGELES . SAN FRACisco
Member, Associated Collegiate Press, 1945.46
NIGHT EDITOR: STUART FINLAYSON
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
German Unity
THE OCCUPATION OF GERMANY will soon
be making the headlines. Last week Ameri-
ca stopped reparations shipments to Russia from
the Americsan zone of occupation, and Moscow
Radio has decried this action as an attempt to
form an Anglo-American block against Russia.
The administration of Germany as a single eco-
nomic unit will be the issue at stake when the
foreign ministers meet on June 15.
The plans for Germany's occupation estab-
lished at Potsdam last August were based on
the presumption that Germany would be con-
trolled as a single economic unit under the con-
trol of a four-power council in Berlin. The same
attitude prevailed last March 26 when the re-
parations agreements were signed. The theory
was that German production would soon be r-
sumed and that non-essential industrial plants
could be taken as reparations. Under these
agreements Rtissia was to receive 15 per cent
of all non-essential industrial plants in western
Germany for which she would pay in food, coal,
and other mineral products, and an additional
10 per cent which she would receive without
making any payment.
Unfortunately, this system has not worked out.
Production in Germany is far behind schedule.
American AMG officials lay the blame on Rus-
sia. The Russian zone contains the raw mater-
ials that the highly industrialized American
zone must have in order to increase or even
maintain production, and Russia has thus far
opposed a free flow of goods between the sepa-
rate zones. Consequently only a trickle of raw
materials has reached the American zone and
production has been stalled.
American deliveries have been halted "to safe-
guard the economy of our zone" in the event that
Germany is never to be administered as a whole.
The American policy, as announced by military
government officials is: "If Germany is to be
divided permanently, our denuding of industry
in our zone would merely give us the dubious
pleasure of always having to support Ger-
many." The fact that our $1,000,000,000 annual
food shipment must be increased to prevent
famine in our sector is an added argument for
free exchange between the agrarian Russian
zone and the industrial American zone.
From both economic and political stand-
points, unified control of Germany is desirable
and necessary. However essential the objective
may be, our action was certainly ill-timed, and
it can scarcely be expected to further amiable
Russian relations or to encourage united Allied
control.
Perhaps it is coincidental that the embargo
was announced soon after the adjournment of
the inconclusive Conference of Foreign Minis-
ters in Paris. Even if we believe this, we still
cannot deny the Russian accusation that we
are lining up the sides for a permanently di-
vided Germany by a move that plainly con-
tradicts our previous decisions and agree-
ments.

Mr. Byrnes would probably term this move
"diplomatic coercion." Whatever advantage this
open break may add to our "fight Russia" cam-
paign, it has little chance of accomplishing our
avowed purpose of obtaining a free flow of
trade or of establishing a central economic con-
trol in Germany. -Tom Walsh
U M am y Rva/n'e .lI

NATIONAL POLITICS are grinding slowly into
high-gear, and the old-liners from both
parties are resorting to their usual tricks in
the drive for re-election.
The Republicans seized eagerly upon Presi-
Dulles' Analysis
On Soviet False
IN ITS MAY 27TH ISSUE ever-aspiring Life
presents an analysis of the Russian "problem"
and concludes that there is no "misunderstand-
ing" between Russia and the West; there is a
conflict.
The chief support offered by Life for its edi-
torial conclusion is the current Russian aggres-
sion in Europe and Asia. This conclusion repre-
sents a dangerous confusion of Soviet aims and
Soviet methods.
In the June 3rd issue of Life, John Foster
Dulles, scholarly analyst of international af-
fairs, concludes: SOVIET LEADERS ASSUME
THAT PEACE AND SECURITY DEPEND
UPON QUICKLY ACHIEVING WORLDWIDE
ACCEPTANCE OF SOVIET POLITICAL PHILO-
SOPHY, WHICH SUPPRESSES CERTAIN PER-
SONAL FREEDOMS IN THE INTEREST OF
ACHIEVING SOCIAL HARMONY.
If this conclusion is valid, then it would
seem to substantiate the view expressed in
the Life editorial. But is Dulles' conclusion
entirely justified?
WE DO NOT PRETEND to be able to inter-.
pret the mystical silence of the Kremlin
Politburo.
But although we do not believe that Dulles
intentionally "stacked the cards" in order to
present an apparently irrefutable argument, yet
he did not fail to deal in the ace of spades.
For the purpose of discussion it is convenient
to divide the world of Soviet influence into
three distinct groups-an Inner Zone, a Middle
Zone and an Outer Zone. It is the Middle Zone
with which Life and Mr. Dulles are most con-
cerned.
The Middle Zone comprises territory, current-
ly or recently occupied by Russian armies, which
is nominally independent but whose governmen-
tal policies are subjected to powerful Soviet
influence. This wide belt extending almost un-
broken along the Russian border includes Po-
land, eastern Germany, 'Czechoslovakia, Eastern
Austria, the Balkans, Outer Mongolia, Man-
churia, northern Korea, and the Sinkiang Pro-
vince of China. Dulles points out that there are
current efforts to extend this zone to Greece,
Iran, Turkey, Kurdistan and southern Korea.
Many of the controversies, labelled as ag-
gression in some quarters, in which Russia is
currently engaged are actually nothing more
than natural developments in long-standing,
almost traditional, disputes.
It is impossible to consider the Polish ques-
tion objectively without some knowledge of the
long and involved history of the struggle be-
tween Poland and Russia. The road between
Warsaw and Moscow is a much-travelled and
bloody highway. The Iran controversy is not,
as many believe, a manifestation of Soviet im-
perialism; it is rather the natural outcome of
a commercial rivalry in Iran between Britain
and Russia that can be traced back to the first
World War.
IN THESE AND OTHER cases we should be
wary of labelling Soviet expansion as "un-
warranted aggression." Opportunistic leaders
may be pressing more or less legitimate claims.
Certainly these claims, legitimate or not, should
not be evaluated merely on the basis of current
dims and policies.
Many Russians believe, not without some
reason, that they are confronted by an Anglo-
American bloc. If the present rightist tendencies
in France continue, Russian suspicions of a solid
bloc of the major Western powers will certainly
be aroused. Soviet counter-strategy is to encour-
age "friendly" governments in all bordering
areas. The ultimate goal of Russian leaders is
a wide protective belt of pro-communist gov-
ernments encircling the Soviet Union and pro-
viding a "barrier" against physical attack and
the penetration of dangerous Western influence.

The most obvious precedent for this type of
foreign policy is our own wartime interpreta-
tion of the Good Neighbor Policy. Certainly the
establishment of "friendly" governments
arbund the borders of the Soviet Union is no
more aggressive in principle than is the at-
tempt of the United States to establish a solid
democratic front in Latin America for the
ultimate purpose of strengthening its own
position. If there is a discrepancy in the com-
parison, it is the difference between the eco-
nomic pressure used by the United States to
accomplish this aim and the militaristic mea-
sures employed by Russia.
We agreed that Russian policies are ruthless.
It is not easy to justify Soviet methods in the
light of our own moral code.
Soviet Middle Zone expansion, however, can be
reasonably justified. Despite the implications of
Life and Mr. Dulles, there is no reason to believe
that this expansion of Soviet influence heralds
World War III.
-John Campbell

dent Truman's proposed labor bill as a perfect
opportunity to regain labor support for the
GOP. Bob Taft, rightly termed "Ohio's senior
obstacle to progress" by Sam Grafton, swarmed
into the fray with indignation in his voice and
votes on his mind . . . a new champion of or-
ganized labor.
This is, there is reason to believe, one in-
stance in which experience may turn out to be
a handicap. A man who has spent 25 years in
politics has doubtless accumulated many facts
which are unknown to the new-comer, but often
he merely fits the new facts into the old pat-
terns.
That's the way it is with Taft. He has spent
his life learning seventeen thousand ways to be
elected senator from Ohio; but he refuses to
pull back the curtains and let some light into
that dark, medieval mind. He is still in the pros-
perous year of 1929, before labor came of age.
He seems really to believe that he can support the
Case Bill which is designed to permanently
hobble the American labor movement, knock
the props out from under OPA, attack Great
Britain and Russia, and still pose as- a "friend
of labor" by simply attacking Mr. Truman's
labor bill. Mr. Taft seems to believe that the
majority of voters are still naive . . . the other
possibility, of course, is that Mr. Taft is naive.
In Georgia today there is another example of
an attempt to win votes by the use of tactics
which are as outmoded, as hopelessly obsolete, as
those used by Taft. The Ku Klux Klan has
emerged from its two years in the nether-world,
and is once more prowling the roads by night
and the polling places by day. They hope to
drag out again the old campaign cry of "White
Supremacy," bully and bluster their way into
office, and then use their legal power to crush
the growing strength of labor and the Negroes
in the South. This is another attempt to divert
the voters' attention from the real issue to a
phoney issue, and then steal him blind while
his back is turned. It's the technique of crying
"Wolf" in the morning, and then unleashing the
bear in mid-afternoon.
In Georgia it is a ease of degenerate, moro-
nic Gene Talmadge plucking his red galluses
and announcing that he welcomes the sup-
port of the KKK. In Ohio it is a case of de-
ceitful, reactionary Bob Taft shaking hands
with labor with his right hand while he beats
its head in with his left.
To say that these tactics are stupid and medie-
val is not to say that they are merely humorous.
They are also dangerous. Five thousand cowards
with white robes and whips can kill tens and
hundreds of defenseless citizens. The recent
atrocity in Columbia, Tennessee should remind
us that race riots and vicious brutality are not
yet a memory only.
The actions of both Talmadge and Taft are
motivated by fear, fear of the growing organi-
zation and activity among workers, Negroes, and
poor farmers. We must not judge, as was sug-
gested at the beginning of this column, that
Taft and Talmadge are naive and have failed to
see the storm. They see it clearly and are fright-
ened by it. Every time the National Farmers
Union gives another instance of its growing
solidarity with labor, Taft becomes quickly pan-
icky and digs deeper into his bag of demagogic
tricks. When the National Negro Congress sends
a telegram to the United Nations demanding an
investigation "of the oppression of Negroes in
the United States," Talmadge plucks his gal-
luses more furiously and screams his epithets
more loudly. Taft and Talmadge both fear that
this unity of Negro, laborer, and farmer will
sweep them onto the political scrap-heap.
-Ray Ginger
A nother 1919-1939?
Looking at world events today and the out-
come of the recent war brings a picture simi-
lar to 1919 and 1920.
The world has organized a security council
which does not guarantee security, a debat-
ing society similar to the League of Nations.
The allies have demonstrated their inability
to achieve world cooperation at the Big Three
meeting at Paris. Wilson voiced his ideals at

Paris also to a group of unhearing ears.
The same famine and poverty is prevalent
throughout Europe with the same oppor-
tunities of warping the next generation.
in 1918 the Russians staged a revolution
whose full impact was not feA until 22 years
later. In China today a state of : revolution
exists which may change the world power
balance in years to come.
The United States crawled into a period
of isolation as soon as the shooting was over
in 1918. Today Congressmen are starting
a war against the OPA and the draft, two
measures along with the civilian control of
the atomic bomb are a definite threat to the
security of tomorrow.
-Kay Peffers
Real Brotherhood
We can all demonstrate real brotherhood by
continuing our contributions to the Famine Re-
lief Drive. Give to the weekly collection in your
house. -al Roemer '

(Continued from Page 2)
physicists or physical chemists with
a M.S. or Sc.D. degree. Call the
Bureau of Appointments, 201 Mason
Hall, ext. 371, for an appointment.
Attention Civil Engineers: The
Wayne County Road Commission is
looking for civil engineers. Any sen-
iors or graduates who are interested
should call at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 201 Mason Hall for further
information.
Mr. Eggleston of Aetna Casualty
and Surety Company will be in our
office on Thursday, June 6, to inter-
view men who are interested in in-
surance sales. Call the Bureau of
Appointments, 201 Mason Hall, ext.
371 for an appointment.
Junior mechanical and chemical
engineers interested in try-out jobs
with the Crane Company this sum-
mer may make appointments for an
interview Thursday afternoon at the
Bureau of Appointments, 201 Mason
Hall, or call ext. 371.
Willow Village Program for Vet-
erans and their Wives:
Wednesday, June 5: Bridge, 2-4
and 8-10 p.m. Conference Room,
West Lodge.
Thursday, June 6: Home Planning
Group invited to attend Tuesday
evening Safety Series program.
Saturday, June 8: Record Dance,
8:30 p.m. Auditorium.
Sunday, June 9: Classical Music,
Records, 3-5 p.m. Office.
Lectures
Mr. Harold H. Burgess of Michigan
State College will speak on the Hin-
terlands of Liberia at 4:15 today in
Room 2039 Natural Science Build-
ing.
The talk is sponsored by the School
of Forestry and Conservation and the
Department of Botany, and will be
illustrated with colored slides. All
are cordially invited to attend.
Biological Chemistry Lecture: Dr.
B. L. Baker of the Department of
Anatomy will speak on "Applications
of Chemical Methods to Mcroscopic
Technique" in the East Lecture Room
of the Rackham Building on Friday,
June 7, at 4 p.m. All interested are
invited.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for James
Martin Lafferty, Electrical Engineer-
ing; thesis: "The Analysis, Design,
and Construction of a Millimeter-
Wave Reflex Ocillator," to be held
today at 1:30 p.m., in Room 275 West
Engineering. Chairman, W. G. Dow.
Doctoral Examination for Henry
Norton Bershas, Romance Languages
(Spanish); thesis: "A Critical Edi-
tion of 'La Gran Conquista de Ultra-
mar,' Book IV, Chapters 194-288," to
be held on Thursday, June 6, at 4:00
p.m., in the East Council Room,
Rackham Building. Chairman, C. P.
Wagner.
Make-up examination in Geology
12 will be held today at 4:00 p.m.
in Room 2054 Natural Science Build-
ing.
Seminar in Analytic Functions will
meet today at 3:00 p.m., in 3201
Angell Hall.
Dr. Piranian will continue his talk
on Discard of Functions and Order
of Singularities.
Zoology Seminar will meet Thurs-
day evening, June 6, at 7:15 p.m. in
the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Mr. Royal B. Brunson will speak
on "Life History and Ecology of some
Michigan Gastrotricha." Mr. Max
R. Matteson will speak on "The Life
History and Ecology of Elliptio Com-
planatus Dillwyn." The seminar is
open to the public.
M.P. 9. Foundry. Class will meet in
front of East Engineering Building

Thursday, June 6, at 12:45 p.m., for
trip to visit the foundry of Central
Specialty Company, Ypsilanti. Upon
return from trip a class meeting will
be held in Room 4307 at 4:00 p.m.
Sociology 196: Final examination
Tuesday, June 11, from 7:00-9:00
p.m., Room D, Haven Hall.
Speech Concentrates: Please call at
the Speech office, 3211 Angell Hall, to
sign up for appointments with the
concentration adviser.
Students, College of Engineering:
Students, now enrolled, who expect to
attend the 1946 Summer Session
should report at the Secretary's Of-
fice, 263 West Engineering Building.
Concerts
Women's Glee Club, Marguerite V.
Hood, conductor, asisted by the Navy

Time of Exercise
Monday at 8 ...
" " 9..
,, 10 ...
fi ,5 11 .
Monday at 1
,, ,, 2 . ..
Tuesday at 8...
", T 9 . .
a 9
, 10 ...
* 11 ...
Tuesday at 1 ...
2 ...
" " 3 ...

Time of Examination
Thu., June 13, 2:00-4:00
Sat., June 15, 2:00-4:00
Fri., June 14, 10:30-12:30
Tues., June 18, 10:30-12:30
Wed., June 19, 8:00-10:00

Spring Term Exam Schedule
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
College of Pharmacy
School of Business Administration
School of Education
School of Forestry and Conservation
School of Music
School of Public Health
June 13 to June 19, 1946
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time of ex-
ercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for courses having
quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of the first quiz period. Cer-
tain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below the regular
schedule. To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student should re-
ceive notification from his instructor of the time and place of his examina-
tion. In the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, no date of examina-
tion may be changed without the consent of the Examination Committee.

. . ..............Mon., June
...............Thu., June
.. . . .... .Fri., June
.. . Thu., June
...............Tues., June
....... .........Mon., June
...............Sat., June
...............Wed., June
...............Tues., June
SPECIAL PERIODS

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
Sociology 51, 54 ....................
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 ................
German 1, 2, 31, 32 ................
Political Science 1, 2, 52 ............
Psychology 42 ......................
Chemistry 55 ....................... .
Speech 31, 32....................
French 1, 2, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62,
91, 92, ,93, 153 ...................
English 1, 2.....................
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54...........
Botany 1 ...........................
Zoology 1 ..........................
School of Business Administration

Thu., June
Fri., June.
Fri., June
Sat., June
Stt., June
Mon., June
Mon., June
Mon., June
Tues., June
Tues., June
Wed., June
Wed., June

17,
13,
14,
13,
18,
17,
15,
19,
18,
13,
14,
14,
15,
15,
17,
17,
17,
18,
18,
19,
19,

10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10:00
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10:00
10:30-12:30
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30

Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary changes
will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Forestry and Conservation
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary changes
will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Music: Individual Instruction in Applied Music
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all applied
music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of the
University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin board at the
School of Music.
School of Public Health
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary changes
will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
June 13 to June 19, 1946
NOTE: For the courses having both.lectures and quizzes, the time
of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of the first
quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the exam-
ination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to such work
during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below
the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned examina-
tion periods must be reported for adjustment. See bulletin board out-
side of Room 3209 East Engineering Building between May 29 and June
5, for instruction. To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each stu-
dent should receive notification from his instructor of the time and
place of his appearance in each course during the period June 13 to
June 19.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent of
the Classification Committee.

Time of Exercise

Time of Examination

Monday
Tuesday

(at
(at
(f~t
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Thursday
Saturday
Friday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Monday
Thursday
Friday
Thursday
Tuesday
Monday
Saturday
Wednesday
Tuesday

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

13
15
14
18
19
17
13
14
13
18
17
15
19
18
13
14
15
17
17
18
19

2-4
2-4
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
8-10
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30

2-4
8-10
2-4
8-10
8-10
2-4
8-10

Chem-Met 1; E.E. 2a
Draw. 1; M.E. 1; Span.;"
E.M. 1; C.E. 2
Draw. 3; Surv. 1, 2, 4
Draw. 2; M.E. 3; Frenc
Econ. 53, 54; English 11
M.P. 2, 3, 4

*Thursday
'German*Friday
*Saturday
*Monday
h *Monday
* Tuesday
*Wednesday

10:30-12:30
8-10
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
' 4
8-10
10:30-12:30

*This may also be used as an irregular period, provided there is no
conflict with the regular printed schedule above.
Prescribed V-12 courses will also follow the above schedule.

s

BARNABY

By Crockett Johnson

and University Choirs, will be heard
in its spring concert at 8:30 Thurs-
day evening, June 6, in Hill Auditor-
ium.
Open to the public without charge,
the program will include songs by
Brahms, Rachmaninoff, Rossini, Ker-
nochan, Wood, and Hageman. Fol-
lowing intermission the Glee Club will
present a group of Latin-American
songs.

rill Wilson, and Clinton Norton, play-
ing Kohler's Grosses Quartett, Op.\
92; Earl Bates, clarinet, heard in
Piece de Concours by Raboud, and
Promenade by Delmas. The public
is invited.
Events Today
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Society
initiation at 8:00 this evening in the
Rackham Amphitheatre, followed by
a reception in the Rackham Assembly

Can't you find his name in the
telephone book, Mr. O'Malley?
/ (Oh ... There are plenty of

It DOES pose a problem. McSnoyd
just won't play on your father's
team unless I can get a favorable
ruling from Happy himself-But

I could ask Pop. He might
know the number. Or could
you wave your magic cigar
instead, Mr. O'Mallev... ?

Legerdemain IS somewhat
flashy ... A conference
with your father might
solve all our oroblems.

Ii

G i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan