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June 02, 1946 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-06-02

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FOUR

THE MICIllGAN DAILY

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND:
Building Up Germany

By DREW PEARSON
WASHINGTON-Greatest tragedy of the cur-
rent strikes is one which few people realize.
They switch the public focus away from the
seeds of war being planted abroad.
Right now, for instance, the U.S. Army has
quietly adopted a new policy in occupied Ger-
many. The change may be purely accidental;
or it may be deliberate. Either way it may bring
future war.
The new policy is to build up Germany in the
American-occupied zone. Here are some con-
crete examples of what has happened.
Recently, the U.S. Army has been suffering
a shortage of gasoline in Germany. However,
there is no serious shortage of gas among
German civilians. They now have more than
under Adolf Hitler.
Furthermore, the U.S. Army has now turned
over to German civilians a total of 8,000 army
trucks. This is one reason why so much gasoline
is flowing in Germany-to keep the 8,000 trucks
moving. With these trucks also went extra
parts and spare tires.
C 1

Simultaneously France and Belgium had been
seeking these trucks, while Czechoslovakia had
requested gasoline. Both were allies of the
United States, not enemy nations. Both were
turned down. The army told the French and
Belgians that the trucks were not in good con-
dition, despite the fact that they are now per-
forming well on German highways. The Czechs,
who were pleading for 20,000 tons of gasoline,
were finally given half that amount-without
disturbing the German economy.
It may have been that the meager help given
Czechoslovakia was due to back-stage Russian
influence in that country and the recent ap-
pearance of Soviet troops in Czechoslovakia,
ostensibly enroute to Berlin.
Aid to Germany at the expense of Belgium
and France is more difficult to explain. It may
simply be due to American efficiency and the
desire to do a good job in any area where Amer-
ican troops are located. In either case, the policy
of building up an ex-enemy which has caused
more wars than any other nation in Europe, is
a vitally important change which the American
people are entitled to know about.
IT HASNT LEAKED OUT, but a Russian re-
quest to purchase 500,000 bales of raw cotton
from this country has been turned down on the
grounds that some of the cloth would be ex-
ported in competition with U.S. textiles. Mean-
while the Department of Agriculture is pro-
ceeding with its plan to furnish German mills
with 154,000 bales of American cotton.
Thus, the Department of Agriculture is
actually pushing a plan to have German mills
export textiles in competition with us-and
with our financing.
(Copyright, 1946, by the Bell Syndicate, Inc.)
.t

BOOKS

P 1
THIS WEEK'S BOOK LIST contains Upton
Sinclair's A World to Win, the seventh in as
many years of the Lanny Budd novels of what
his publishers term The World's End Series. In
this latest volume Sinclair traces the events of
World War II through his seemingly ageless
presidential agent 103, Lanny Budd. It is history
in story form, which is Mr. Sinclair's avowed
purpose of the series. While Sinclair, a writer
not without some merit, could probably write
creditable fiction or creditable history, this, his
latest systhesis, suffers as a result of the com-
bination. For as history A World to Win is
shallow and often misleading in its over simpli-
fication and interpretation of deeply complicated
political, economic, and military occurences
from Vichy through, and including, the German
attack on Russia. And as fiction it is too like
a newspaper account of the inside story of what
Churchill said to Roosevelt over their private
telephone.
Lanny Budd has intimate talks not only with
Petain, Admiral Darlan, and Hitler, but he chats
amiably with "Winnie,' "F.D." and "Uncle Joe"
and even drinks a toast with Stalin to the effect
that, "may he (Stalin) live to carry out a pro-
gram of democracy, with freedom of speech and
religion for all men." These along with other
in-the-know items will undoubtedly delight the
fans of Upton Sinclair, and there seem .to be
many. But for those who are concerned with
the state and welfare of American letters, A
World to Win is a confirmation of the present
day assertion that we are a sick people.
It is no better, and certainly no worse than
the preceding volumes. And next year we can
certainly look forward to reading what good old
Mac said to Hirohito upon their first meeting
in the eighth of this Without End Series.
-Don Thornbury.
General Library List
Butcher, Henry C.
My Three Years with Eisenhower
New York, Simon & Schuster, 1946.
Farrell, James T.
Bernard Clare. New York, Vanguard, 1946.
Forbes, Roita Torr
Appointment with Destiny. New York, Dut-
ton, 1946.
Hutton, Graham
Midwest at Noon. Chicago, University of
Chicago press, 1946.
Stuart, Jesse
Foretaste of Glory. New York, Dutton, 1946.
Werfel, Franz
Poems, translated by Edith Abercrombie
Snow. Princeton, Princeton University press,
1945.
NIGHT EDITOR: CLYDE RECHT
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
World Example
A recent newspaper article written by an
American correspondent in China states that
"many Chinese find it hard to understand why
a nation as insistent as the United States is
that China put in order its affairs for peace is
unable to bring cooperation into its own house-
keeping."
The eyes of the entire world are resting on
the American domestic scene. The breakdown
of our economy due to the current railroad
and coal strikes wil have severe economic re-
percussions in both Europe and the Far East.
These areas depend on us for vital food and
other commodities. If we cannot manage to
care for the physical needs of these people and
keep our house in order, we cannot expect to
retain American influence abroad.
At present, we are competing with Russian
influence in our zones of occupation and sur-
rounding areas. American progress in Germany
has not been encouraging; Gen. Marshall's
Chinese peace was short-lived. If, in addition
to these none too prepossessing records, we fail
to feed the starving people of the world, Amer-
ica's stock in international approbation will

Donmini Says

R ELIGIOUS CALLINGS are in the running
again. For fully half a century the Graduate
Courses in Religion and the Theological Sem-
inaries have been getting few of the first rate
minds. But today, due to a combination of
influences they are getting the best. Yale, Union
at Columbia, Chicago, Pacific School of Religion,
and Princeton advise us that the fall classes
promise more for the religious leadership of the
future than at any time during the current
century. Likewise, the inquiries made by vet-
erans as to the possibility of some form of
religious leadership in world affairs is encour-
aging, not as to numbers but as to quality.
Now that the post-war period of reconstruc-
tion begins to take on patterns some of the
influences may be enumerated. The depression
followed by a second world war made plain to
youth the sickness of our culture. That sick-
ness appearing at the bottom of the Fascist
and Nazi type of social nihilism surprised but
did not embitter our youth. It taught them
that the nature of civilization lies deeper than
economics. Their fathers and mothers thought
the whole sickness could be cured by shun-
ning Communism and labor leaders, or by
learning more of an old economic theory. They
sent their boys into Engineering, Business
or Political Science. The sons begin to under-
stand that life is complex and that there are
indirect causes more powerful than, the sur-
face ones. They ask about the purpose of
life itself.
Having been educated by the dole during the
depression, advised that our democratic way,
by sheer virtue of truth would speedily give
every man employment and by means of free
enterprise would offer adequate inducement for
the more ambitious of the population to make a
few millions as their fathers did, our students
went to war. Now that we come out of war with
a forbidding repudiation of the Four Freedoms
for which they bombed Cologne and traversed
the Pacific with atomic energy, they are dazed.
Having been drilled upon the Atlantic Charter
with its humanitarian announcements while
they were in uniform, they look about to find
that lobbies in Washington never quote that
document. In the home-town they discover that
adequate housing is delayed because for ten
years the money grabbers who sent those lob-
bies to the capital never did believe F.D.R. when
he properly enough told them that liberty could
be maintained in the U.S. and introduced to
other countries of the world. -Human nature is
certainly complex. What is life anyhow?
The youth entering graduate study in religion
are doing so not to escape hard thinking and
great intellectual conflict. They say deliberately,
in so far as we have met them or received direct
reports from other Counselors, that the prob-
lems are deeper than political systems, more
profound than economic theory alone, more
fundamental than reshaping the governmental
controls and more difficult than our current sec-
ular education had led us to believe. That the
top scientists have come out of laboratory and
organized themselves into crusading bands is
assurance enough that religion was correct in
the first place. Now they say let us get down to
giving religious goal the necesary techniques.
One way to do this is to look beneath the symp-
toms, discover causes, know the ideal and master
motivation. Religion broadly conceived is the
field which must be brought abreast.
-Edward W. Blakeman,
Counselor in Religious Education

Russias Fea r
U.S.=Briish floc
By EDDY GILMORE
((Eddy Gilmore, Associated Press Correspondent
now home for a vacation, has spent the last five years
in Russia. Ie is married to a Russian girl, knows the
language, and has had an opportunity vouchsafed to
few if any other foreigners in Russia in recent years.
It was through Gilmore that Stalin recently addressed
to the world a promise of cooperation for peace.)
NEW YORK, May 30 P)--Despite Secretary
Byrnes' protestations that no Anglo-Amer-
ican bloc exists against the Soviet Union, the
prevailing opinion in the U.S.S.R. now and in
the past is that such a bloc does exist and words
alone, no matter how earnest, will do nothing
to eliminate the belief.
British and American representatives in Mos-
cow are acutely aware of the Russian point of
view on this subject and it is often one of their
most delicately handled bits of protocol. Both
sides go well out of their way, often to what
seems fantastic ends, to avoid it.
Only recently, when the new United States
Ambassador, Walter Bedell Smith, was to arrive
in the Russian capital, it came up-and pointed-
ly.
Several high ranking members of the British
colony announced they planned to journey to
the airport and give Smith the customary diplo-
matic welcome.
"Oh, no, we won't," said persons in authority,
"we can't give the Russians the impression that
we're welcoming a new batsman to the cricket
field."
The well meaning, friendly Britishers stayed
at home.
The fact that Americans and Englishmen
speak the same language is, in this one par-
ticular, unfortunate. Just as spectators at a
ball game never know what the umpire and
players are saying to one another, the Rus-
sians never know what the Americans and
British are saying.
The suspicion of the bloc has been coming
along at a nice rate for a diplomatic matter.
Seeking to comment on the question about
18 months ago I wrote:
"The Russians believe there is a movement
among the British and Americans to gang up
on them."'
The censor suggested that I write it:
"The Russians hope there is no movement
among the British and Americans to gang up
on them."
Twelve months later I put it much stronger
and it passed. After Winston Churchill's Mis-
souri speech, I don't believe the censor would
like it if you suggested that the Russians. were
not firmly convinced that a gang-up was in
progress.
The testimony of General Eisenhower and
Admiral Nimitz before the House Foreign Af-
fairs Committee that military and naval col-
laboration among countries of the Western
hemisphere is necessary is sure, to anyone
remotely acquainted with the state of the
present Russian mind, to set off new bursts of
suspicion.
Russians are going to read Eisenhower's
words "anyone who looks at the globe can ob-
serve that the shortest air route to the United
States from Asia or Europe is over the North
Pole" with new alarm.
The whole Hemisphere defense proposal is
going to cause a tempest of discussion in the
high councils in the U.S.S.R.
Frankly-and I stress Pm only trying today
to explain the Russian point of view-it's going
to sound like what has come to be known in
Moscow as the Churchill Plan to Attack Against
the Soviet Union.
At the same time the Russians are going to
growl and mutter to themselves and perhaps
publicly, that people who not only object but
often denounce them for their policy in certain
countries in Europe, now suggest American
Military and Naval collaboration with South
American countries.
To a Russian this is either blindness or su-
preme hypocrisy.
County PoliticsI

Last week Washtenaw County Prosecutor
John W. Rae was acquitted on a disorderly
charge in Municipal Court. This case was
lifted from the realm of the inconspicuous by
its serious political implications.
During the course of the trial a public of-
ficial of twenty years experience and almost
four terms in a position of high trust admitted
calling the chairman of the County Republi-
can Committee to determine his course of
action in the case in order to "avoid publi-
city."
This same official was charged with endea-
voring to persuade Prosecutor Rae to resign
his office so that the charges could be drop-
ped, since his actions were apparently ini-
mical to the party name and interests.
No formal charges were placed against Rae
until more than two months had elapsed after
the date of the incident. Meanwhile, no
attempt was made by any local officials to
investigate the case. Finally, the attorney-
general undertook the investigation at the
behest of the county Board of Supervisors.
Such reprehensible actions by those in
office and politics leave only two alternatives
for those interested in cleaning up local
government: The ballot box or the grand
jury. -Clyde Recht

(Continued from Page 2)
Examination Announcements have
been received in this office for:
Publicist I: Salary, $200-$240.
Publicist II: Salary, $250-$290.
Publicist III: Salary, $300-$360.
Public8Relations Executive IV: Sal-
ary, $380-$440.
Bacteriologist I: Salary, $200-$240.
Bacteriologist II: Salary, $250-$290.
Closing date June 19.
For further information, call at the
Bureau of Appointments, 201 Mason e
Hall.q
Willow Village Program for Vet-s
erans and their Wives: .
Sunday, June 2: Classical Music.
Records, 3-5 p.m. Office, West Lodge.
Tuesday, June 3: Discusion Group, t
7:30 p.m. Office.
Tuesday, June 4: Safety Series,
"Home Groan," Miss Frances E. Wil-
son, Home Demonstration Agent of
Washtenaw County-demonstration,
followed by movie on canning. 8:00
p.m. Village Community House.
Wednesday, June 5: Bridge, 2-4
and 8-10 p.m. Conference Room,
West Lodge.
Thursday, June 6: Home Planning
Group invited to attend Tuesday
evening Safety Series program.
Saturday, June 8: Record Dance,
8:30 p.m. Auditorium.
Sunday, June 9: Classical Music,
Records, 3-5 p.m. Office.
Lectur?s
Lecture, College of Architecture
and Design: Tau Sigma Delta,
Architecture and Design Honorary,
will sponsor Mr. Roger Allen, Pres-
ident, Michigan Society of Archi-
tects, Wednesday, June 5, 4:15 p.m.,
in the College of Architecture audi-
torium. The annual Tau Sigma
Delta Sophomore awards will be
made at this time.rThe public is
invited.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Filadelfo
Panlilio, Engineering Mechanics;
thesis: "The Theory of Limit Design
Applied to Magnesium Alloy and
Aluminum Alloy Structures," Mon-
day, June 3, at 3:00 'p.m., in 406
West Engineering. ChairmannJ. A.
Van den Broek
Doctoral Examination for William
H. Sullivan, Chemistry; thesis:"Arti-
ficially Produced Radioisotopes of
Tungsten and Rhenium," to be held
on Tuesday, June 4, at 2:00 p.m., in
the East Council Room, Rackham
Building. Chairman, K. Fajans.
Sociology 196: Final examination
on Tuesday, June 11, from 7:00-9:00
p.m., Room D, Haven Hall.
Department of Bacteriology Sem-
inar: Tuesday, June 4, at 8:30 a.m.
in Room 1564 East Medical Building.
Subject: The Paracolon Bacilli. All
interested are invited.
Concerts
Carillon Recital: Percival Price,
University Carillonneur, will present
a program at 3:00 this afternoon,
which will include a group of hymns,
Sonata for carillon by Van Hoof, and
six British folk songs.
Student Recital: Harry I. Phillips
will present a recital in partial ful-
fillment of the requirements for the
degree of Master of Music in Wood-
wind Instruments, at 8:30 Tuesday
evening, June 4, in Rackham Assem-
bly Hall.
He will be assisted by Mildred
Andrews, pianist, and Edward Or-
mond, violist, in a program during
which he will play compositions for
the clarinet, flute, and oboe. His in-
structors in these instruments have
been Albert Luconi and Russell How-
land. The public is cordially invited.

University of Michigan Women's
Glee Club, Marguerite V. Hood, Con-
ductor, will present its annual spring
concert at 8:30 Thursday evening,
June 6, in Hill Auditorium.
The first half of the program will
consist of compositions by Brahms,
Rachmaninoff, Rossini, Kernochan,
Wood, and Hageman, while the sec-
ond half, entitled "Latin-American
Fiesta", will feature appropriate mu-
sic. It will be open to the general
public without charge.
Events Today
Hindustan Association: Spring
Meeting at 7:30 tonight at Lane Hall.
The program includes formation of
a committee for the forthcoming De-
troit performance, secretary's and
treasurer's reports, solo dances and
songs. Members and their American
friends are cordially invited to at-
tend.
(Continued on Page 7)

Time of Exercise
Monday at 8 .,.
"o "$ 9 ..
" 10 ...
"f " 11 ...

Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
",

at
t
at
"I
"
at
",

1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

...............Tues., June
................Wed., June
'... '.'....... Mon., June
................Thu., June
............... Fri., June
...... ... Thu., June
........... Tues., June
...............Mon., June
................Sat., June
...............Wed., June
...............Tues., June
SPECIAL PERIODS

18, 10:30-12:30
19, 8:00-10:00
17, 10:30-12.30
13, 10:30-12:30
14, 2:00- 4:00
13, 8:00-10:00
18, 2:00- 4:00
17, 8:00-10:00
15, 8:00-10:00
19, 2:00- 4:00
18, 8:00-10:00

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Spring Term Exam Schedule
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
College of Pharmacy
School of Business Administration
School of Education
School of Forestry and Conservation
School of Music
School of Public Health
June 13 to June 19, 1946
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time of ex-
ercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for courses having
quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of the first quiz period. Cer-
tain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below the regular
schedule. To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student should re-
ceive notification from his instructor of the time and place of his examina-
tion. In the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, no date of examina-
tion may be changed without the consent of the Examination Committee.

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
Sociology 51, 54 ..................
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 ..................
German 1, 2, 31, 32 ................
Political Science 1, 2, 52 ............
Psychology 42 ......................
Chemistry 55 .......................
Speech 31, 32 ....................
French 1, 2, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62,
91, 92, 93, 153 ..................
English 1, 2 ............. . ...... .
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54..... ....
Botany 1........................
Zoology 1...................
School of Business Administration

Thu., June
Fri., June
Fri., June
Sat., June
Sat., June
Mon., June
Mon., June

13,
14,
14,
15,
15,
17,
17,
17,
18,
18,
19,
19,

10:30-12:30
8:00-10 :00
8:00-10 :00
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10 :00
8:00-10 :00
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30

Time of Examination
Thu., June 13, 2:00-4:00
Sat., June 15, 2:00-4:00
Fri., June 14, 10:30-12:30

Mn.,,
Tues.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
.Wed.,

June
June
June
June.

Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any necessary changes
will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Forestry and Conservation
Courses not covered by this schedule as w'ell as any necessary changes
will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Music: Individual Instruction in Applied Music
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all applied
music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit.in any unit of the
University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin board at the
School of Music.
School of Public Health
Courses riot covered by this schedule as well as any necessary changes
will be indicated on the School bulletin board..
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
June 13 to June 19, 1946
NOTE: For the courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time
of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of the first
quiz period.
Drawing and laboratorywork may be continued through the exam-
ination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to such work
during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below
the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned examina-
tion periods must be reported for adjustment. See bulletin board out-
side of Room 3209 East Engineering Building between May 29 and June
5, for instruction. To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each stu-
dent should receive notification from his instructor of the time and
place of his appearance in each course during the period June 13 to
June 19.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent of
the Classification Committee.

Time of Exercise

Time of Examination

Monday
Tuesday

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Thursday
Saturday
Friday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Monday
Thursday
Friday
Thursday
Tuesday
Monday
Saturday
Wednesday
Tuesday

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

13
15
14
18
19
17
13
14
13
18
17
15
19
18
13
14
15
17
17
18
19

2-4
2-4
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
8-10
10:30-12:3.0
10:30-12:30

2-4
8-10
2-4
8-10
8-10
2-4
8-10

Chem-Met 1; E.E. 2a
Draw. 1; M.E. 1; Span.;
E.M. 1; C.E. 2
Draw. 3; Surv. 1, 2, 4
Draw. 2; M.E. 3; Frencl
Econ. 53, 54; English 11
M.P. 2, 3, 4

*Thursday
German*Friday
*Saturday
*Monday
h *Monday
* Tuesday
*Wednesday

10:30-12:30.
8-10
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2-4
8-10
10:30-12:30

*This may also be used as an irregular period, provided there is no
conflict with the regular printed schedule above.
Prescribed V-12 courses will also follow the above schedule.
Fifty-Sixth Year
Edited and managed by students of the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Hoard in Control of Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Margaret Farmer . . . . . . . . . Managing Editor
Hale Champion.. . . . . . . . . . . Editorial Director

BARNABY

By Crockett Johnson
1.

MMMM

WV,

I

There's precedent for a ten man baseball team
m'boy. Abner Doubleday to the contrary. Merely

Your father's feeble team)
could use an extra hand-

I W;"

The same. He's always good for a base on
balls. And imagine him on the defense-

0

IMAifnr

--1---_i .r_15- --

F.

I I

r

Robert Goldman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . city Eaitor

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