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June 01, 1946 - Image 2

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, J -FLT NE 1, 1946

PAGE TWO SATURDAY, JUNE 1, 194~

Fifty-Sixth Year

- Edited. and managed by students of the University of
Michigan under the authority of the Board in Control
of Student Publications.
Editorial Staff

Margaret Farmer
lae Champion
Robert Goldman
Emily E. Knapp
Pat Cameron
Clark Baker
Des Howarth
Ann Schutz
Dona Guimaraes

. . . . . . . Managing Editor
. . . . . Editorial Director
. . . . .... .. City Editor
. . . . . . . . Associate Editor
... Associate Editor
. . . . . . Sports Editor
o. . . . . ciate Sports Editor
. . . . . Women's Editor
. . . . Associate, Wonen's Editor

Business Staff
Dorothy Flint . . . . . . Business Manager
Joy Altman . . . . . . Associate Business Manager
Evelyn Milla . . . . . Associate Business Manager
Telephone 23-24-1
Member of The Associated Press
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for re-publication of all news dispatches credited to it or
otherwise credited in this newpaper. All rights of re-
publication of all other matters herein also reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second-class mail matter.
Subscription during the regular school year by car-
rier, $4.50, by mail, $5.25.
REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING Y
National Advertising Service, Inc.
"N College Publishers Representative
420 MADSON AVS. "- EW YORK N.Y.
CHICAGO " 8O071N * LOS ANGELS + SAN FRANCSC
Member, Associated Collegiate Press, 1945-46
NIGHT EDITOR: FRANCES PAINE
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
DP Tragedy
SOME PEOPLE may think it a hilarious joke
... "What did the displaced Balt say to the
non-repatriable Lett?", the new European ver-
sion of Joe Miller, but if the displaced Balt
said anything to his Lett friend, the humor in it
is dubious.
One of the greatest problems left by the war
is the tragedy of the DPs, the displaced persons,
the people from all over Europe who have no
place to go, and live in temporary centers set
up by the Allies.
DP is a very convenient label for 800,000 Polish
deportees, 21,000 Estonian, 61,000 Latvian (Lett),
47,000 Lithuanian, 90,000 Hungarian, 10,000
Romanian, and 3,000 Ruthenian. These people
landed in Germany during the war. Some were
dragged or kidnapped; some were forced there
by economic pressure; some went voluntarily,
finding the money, or, possibly, the Hitlerian
doctrine attractive. However they got to Ger-
many, they must be returned or resettled now.
The original division of attitude among the
Big Three accounts for some of the bungling
that has characterized the handling of the DPs.-
The Russians at first wanted back all people
whom they regarded as their own nationals.
The United States and England worked on the
premise that people shouldn't be sent back un-
less they wanted to go. The Russians acted like
a mother reaching out for her sons. The United
States and Britain wouldn't provide the lasso.
The Russians at last came around to the idea
that only war criminals, quislings, and traitors
should be returned by force, and the dispute
was settled. But the problem remains.
Some repatriation does go on. Within six
months there will only be about 600,000 dis-
placed persons in western Germany. These will
be the non-repatriables, those who can't return
to their homelands and must be given new homes.
About one-third of the non-repatriables will
be Jews. If only for psychological reasons they
must be taken out of Germany. They have natur-
ally turned toward Palestine. Physically there is
no question that Palestine can absorb Europe's
200,000 non-repatriable Jews, if not many more
who want to go there. Which means that Bri-
tish stalling and Arab arguments will have to be
by-passed. This the United Nations can, and
must, do.
The other 400,000 non-repatriables, those
without a promised land of closed doors and legal
malarky, can take hope in the newly-created
United Nations specializedagency which is to
deal with the problem. The agency should pro-
fit by the mistakes of the Intergovernmental
Committee on refugees.
But before any real aid can come to the non-
repatriables, there must be a change in attitude
on the part of the major powers. As James G.

McDonald, a member of the Anglo-American
Palestine Commission said: "governments, when
dealing with refugees, have almost invariably
taken the short view of national self interest and
have ignored or played down the interests of
mankind . . . With few notable exceptions their
actions have been characterized by hesitancy,

ITIsO hAPPENS
Internecine Strife
Inside 'Saratoga Trunk'
FIRST IN A LINE of complaints about the
world in general is an outcry against the
movie-reviewing profession-The Daily's astute
critic not excepted. We have been to "Saratoga
Trunk" on his mild recommendation, and have
this to say:
1) There's no reason why Bill Hart should have
retired while Gary Cooper stayed on,
2) Movie directors have an increasing tendency
to define a symbol as something with which you
hit the audience over the head,
3) There is nothing so offensive as Holly-
wood's maudlin treatment of physical differ-
ences; the handling of the midget Cupidon be-
ing our selection for the worst taste in direction
this year,
4) A proper critical perspective doesn't assume
that just because a movie is better than "Ad-
venture" it should be worth 43 cents and two
and a half hours.
* * * *
Strange and Wonderful Career
VERY ONCE IN A WHILE a little gem (of
pubic relations) is wafted into the office.
Such is the "American Story" of William K.
Jackson, probably the most colorful man ever
to be elected President of the US Chamber of
Commerce.
Ignoring the Horatio Alger emphasis of the
four page release, let us tell you briefly of a
man with shoots of silver in his dark hair, with
green thumbs which broaden into green hands
in his rose garden, a man who grew fast be-
cause he had to, a man whose peak youthful
triumph was a prize-winning essay on "The
Sunday Laws of Virginia."
As the release-with distressing lack of mo-
desty-points out, "this story has adventure."
Well, maybe, but we think mystery is a better
word.
MERRY-GO-ROUND:
NVazi Patients
By DREW PEARSON
WASHINGTON.-Obscured by the strike news,
a vitally important battle is being waged
back-stage in Washington over control of Ger-
man patents. The battle illustrates how when
Harry Truman knows his onions he always
tries to follow through. The issue involves whe-
ther German patents seized by the U.S. Govern-
ment during the war shall be opened to all
companies, or monopolized by one.
Most important German company seized
in this country is General Aniline and Film.
It owns hundreds of valuable patents of great
benefit to all American industry.
When it was seized by Alien Property Cus-
todian Leo Crowley, Crowley placed on the board
of directors Victor W. Emanuel of Aviation Cor-
poration, Standard Gas and Electric, and other
big corporations; also George Allen, another
Victor Emanuel messenger boy. It so happened
that Victor Emanuel was then paying Crowley
a salary of $60,000 a year, even though Crowley
was also acting as Alien Property Custodian.
It also happened that George Allen, though
right-hand advisor to Truman, was being paid
several salaries by Victor Emanuel as a director
of Republic Steel, Aviation Corporation, Vultee
Aircraft, etc.
This nice, neat little keep-it-in-the-family
arrangement has continued, even though Leo
Crowley is now out of the Government. Since
then his stooge, James Markham, also close to
Victor Emanuel, has continued to let General
Aniline and Film hog the Nazi patents.
Finally, the Government's cartel committee
held a hearing to decide the fate of these pa-
tents. General Aniline and Film, no longer run
by the Nazis but still determined to keep Nazi

patents from American industry, hired patent
attorney Will Davis to plead its case. But the
committee ruled otherwise, decided all Ameri-
cans dontributed to winning the war, therefore
all American industry should have access to
enemy patents seized during the war.
Only dissenting vote was Leo Crowley stooge
James Markham, who succeeded Crowley as
Alien Property Custodian. Markham fought so
hard for his Victor Emanuel friends that later
he even went over the cartel committee's head
to the White House.
President Truman, however, turned a deaf ear.
As head of the Truman committee he had in-
vestigated Germany's patents and their mono-
polistic ties with Alcoa and Standard Oil of
New Jersey. He knew what harm these monop-
olies had done the American public in holding
back synthetic rubber and magnesium.
"That happens to be something I know all
about," the President told his Alien Property
Custodian. "Those patents should be open to
all companies."
But despite the official command of the
President of the United States, Alien Property
Boss Markham has not yet carried out orders.
The German patents, at this writing, still are
being hogged by Markham's Victor Emanuel
friends on General Aniline and Film.
(Copyright, 1946, by the Bell Syndicate, Inc.)

eCleeri to the Cior
Candidate's Labor Platform
To the Editor:
I HAVE BEEN ASKED by Mr. Nolan and Mr.
Wild of the A.V.C. for my specific labor plat-
form. The most essential reform I propose aims
at the cause of considerable labor unrest. I refer
to the desire of labor to keep wages in line with
living costs.
I believe that the minimum wage standard
should not be "based on a rigid monetary figure.
Forty cents an hour was adequate at one time.
The sixty-five cents now proposed may not be
sufficient for long. I believe the national mini-
mum wage should be a figure which is variable
and automatically adjustable to meet fluctua-
tions in the cost of living. The President, with the
approval of Congress, should appoint a com-
mission whose function it would be to study
the commodity prices in the country and to
adjust the minimum wage periodically in order
to automatically maintain a real minimum wage.
Commodity prices are now available from month
to month. It is possible to determine with a high
degree of accuracy how much the minimum
wage should be adjusted up or down. Each wage
above the minimum should be defined as the
minimum wage plus a fixed amount. Thus all
wages would fluctuate in relation to the cost
of living.
The employers who are interested in keeping
labor costs low could influence wages by keep-
ing the prices of their own products down. If
prices dropped, employers would not be con-
fronted with the problem of laying off workers,
because the automatic wage cut would allow
them to retain their entire force. Labor leaders
could no longer justify demands for wage in-
creases by pointing to the rising cost of living.
Respectfully submitted,
-Henry Vander Velde
Candidate for Re-
publican Nomination
for Representative
in Congress
* * * *
Deutscher Verein
To the Editor:
IN HIS LETTER of May 28, George Koeser has
misrepresented an organization about whose
activities he is obviously ignorant. By his own
admission he both did not attend the travelogue
on Pre-war Germany and he did not take part
in any discussion about the German relief pro-
gram. The Deutscher Verein is an organization
in which students may practice speaking German
and, at the same time, enjoy themselves. It is
not an organization for the propagation of Ger-
man nationalism. I suggest that he attend a
meeting of the Verein and then, perhaps, he may
write a more accurate letter on the subject, if
he still feels that it is his duty to the University
to uncover subversive activities. Mr. Koeser
mentioned two things about which he was not
fully informed. Since he was not at the meet-
ing, perhaps he would like to know what went
on.
Mr. Koeser obviously cannot imagine time
existing before his own era, and thus all pre-war
Germany was a paradise built by and for Hitler.
The Pre-war Germany of the travelogue was
however the Germany of Goethe and Schiller
and Heine and Beethoven, Brahms and Strauss.
Much of the film was devoted to showing the
topographical features of Germany, the Rhine
River, the Harty Mountains, the sea coast and
so forth. If Mr. Koeser feels that the cathedrals
dating from the 12th century should have been
destroyed by war, he is more narrow than even his
letter shows him to be. It really is too bad that
such works of art and of the ages had to be
destroyed. Not only were they works of art, but
were signposts in the history of world culture,
and in their destruction, the world lost a large
part of its culture. Are you repelled by Strauss or
Goethe Mr. Koeser, or don't you recognize the
names?
As for the collection made in relief of Ger-
man children, in German classes and in the meet-
ing itself, the objection was raised that other
countries needed money and food more than

Germans. To this, the majority agreed. Those
of the students who have relatives in Germany
were told how to send food to them, and other
donations were individual matters. In his letter,
however, Mr. Koeser has attacked the children
of Germany, calling them names and proposing
to allow them to starve, if it goes that far. Does
he blame three-year-olds for the war? And does
he take it for granted that Germany will rise
again as an aggressor nation? If not, he must not
condemn any child, whatever its parentage.
Mr. Koeser, in his outburst, has insulted the
Deutscher Verein and its members.
-Ruth M..Ellis
Airspace and Peace
The dilemma which faced President Wilson
and the other Chiefs of State of the Allied and
Associated Powers at Versailles in 1919 must be
faced again, but under infinitely more difficult
and complex circumstances. The grave possibil-
ities of the use of air power in the new atomic
era pose questions which will make world history.
If the future military disarmament is neces-
sary for security purposes, the right of the state
to use its airspace must be prohibited or fully
controlled. Nothing else will prove satisfactory.
This is the lesson of the Versailles failure.
-John C. Cooper in Foreign Affairs

Pubication in the Daily Official Bul-
letin is constructive notice to all mem-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent in typewritten
form to the Assistant to the President,
1021 Angel Hall, by 3:30 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.n. Sat-
urdays).
SATURDAY, JUNE 1, 1946
VOL. LVI, No. 154
Notices
To the members of the faculty -e
College of Literature, Science, and Q
the Arts:
The June meeting of the Faculty of t
the College of Literature, Science, s
and the Arts for the academic year c
1945-4 will be held Monday, June t
3, at 4:10 in Room 1025 Angell Hall.t
Hayward Keniston
AGENDA
1.Consideration of the minutes of
the meeting of May 6, 1946 (pp.
1264-1268).
2. Electiorn of members on the
University Council and Administra -
tive Board. Nominating Committee:
Associate Professor T. M. Newcomb,
Professor R. V. Churchill, and As-
sociate Professor A. H. Marckwardt
Chairman.
3. Consideration of reports submit-
ted with the call to this meeting.
a. Executive Committee - Pro-
fessor E. S. Brown.
b. University Council - Pro-
fessor N. R. F. Maier. No report.
c. Executive Board of the Grad-
uate School - Dean Okkelberg for
Professor K. K. Landes.
d. Senate Advisory Coimittee on
University Affairs - Professor N.
E. Nelson.
e. Deans' Conference - Dean
Hayward Keniston.
4. Special order on student absence
from classes.
5. Committee on curriculum.
6. Report on veterans refresher
course.
7. Report on faculty housing.
8. New business and announce-
ments.
Notice to Men Students and House-
holders:
The closing date for the Spring
Term will be June 22 and room rent
in approved rooming houses for men
shall be computed to include this
date. As per the terms of the con-
tracts, students are expected to pay
the full amount of the contract three
weeks before the end of the term.
Registration for the Summer Ses-
sion begins June 26 and classes begin
July 1.
If either the householder or the
student wishes to terminate their pre-
sent rooming house agreement, notice
should be given to the Office of the
Dean of Students on or before June
1. Student may secure forms for
this purpose in Room 2, University
Hall.
Orientation advisors are still ur-
gently needed for the sumnier and
fall terms. Men who will be willing
to work between semesters or during
the week beginning Sunday, Septem-
ber 15, please leave their names at
the Union Student Offices, week-
days from 3:00 to 5:00, or call Al
Farnsworth, 2-3002. There are no
restrictions as to class or school, and
veterans and men with previous ex-
perience are particularly needed.
Football Tickets: Football admis-
sion tickets for University of Michi-
gan students will be issued at the
time of registration for the fall se-
mester.
Students who wish to purchase
tickets for their parents or friends
should order tickets before August
1 to be assured of receiving them.
Application blanks for tickets may
be obtained at the ticket office in
the AdministrationBuilding on Fer-
ry Field between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30
p.m. daily.
Lockers at the Intramural Sports
Building must be vacated by June
7. The building will be closed on
and after June 8.

Navy V-12 Senior Engineers: Mr.
L. H. McCormick-Goodhart of the
Ford Motor Company will interview
Nafy V-12 students who are avail-
able for permanent employment in
June 1946, on Tuesday, June 4, in
Room 218 West Engineering Build-
ing. Students may sign the inter-
view schedule posted on the bulletin
board at 221 W. Engr. Bldg.
Seniors in Chemical-Metallurgical,
Electrical, Mechanical and Industrial
Engineering: Representatives of the
Cincinnatti Milling Machine Com-
pany will interview June and August
1946 graduating seniors in the above
groups, on Monday, June 3, in Room
218 W. Engineering Bldg.
. Students may sign the - interview
schedule posted on the bulletin board
at Room 221 W. Engr. Bldg.
A Representative from the North
American Companies will be at the

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Time of Exercise

Time of Examination

Monday at 8
", "f 9
"> " 10
" " 11
Monday at 1
" "r 2
"> ", 3
Tuesday at 8
"s " 10f
" ", 1 1
Tuesday at 1
" "'' 2
a " }" 3

.......................Thu., June
...................... Sat., June
...................... Fri., June l
.................. Tues., June
......................W ed., June
.................... M on., June
.......................Thu., June
...................... Fri., June ]
......................Thu., June
......................Tues., June
.......................M on., June
....................... Sat., June
.................. W ed., June
......................Tues., June
SPECIAL PERIODS

13,
15,
14,
18,
19,
17,
13,
14,
13,
18,
17,
15,
19,
18,

2:00-4:00
2:00-4:00
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
8:00-10 :00
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10:00
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10:00

Spring rfTermilExam Schedule
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
College of Pharmacy
School of Business Administration
School of Education
School of Forestry and Conservation
School of Music
School of Public Health
June 13 to June 19, 1946
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time of ex-
ercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for courses having
quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of the first quiz period. Cer-
ain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below the regular
schedule. To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student should re-
ceive notification from his instructor of the time and place of his examina-
ion. In the College of Literature. Science, and the Arts, no date of examina-
tion may be changed without the Ocnsent of the Examination Committee.

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
Sociology 51, 54 ....................
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 ..................
German 1, 2, 31, 32..............
Political Science 1, 2, 52 ............
Psychology 42 ......................
Chemistry 55 .......................
Speech 31, 32.................
French 1, 2, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62,
91, 92, 93, 153 ..................
English 1, 2 ........................
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54...........
Botany 1 ...........................
Zoology 1 ..........................
School of Business Administration

Thu., June1
Fri., June1
Fri., June1
Sat., June1
Sat., June1
Mon., June
Mon., June]
Mon., JuneI
Tues., June
Tues., June
Wed., June
Wed., June

13,
14,
14,
15,
15,
17,
17,
17,
18,
18,
19,
19,

10:30-12:30
8:00-10:00,
8:00-10:00
10 :30-12:30
10 :30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30

Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary changes
will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Forestry and Conservation
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary changes
will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Music: Individual Instruction in Applied Music
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all applied
music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of the
University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin board at the
School of Music.
School of Public Health
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary changes
will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
June 13 to June 19, 1946
NOTE: For the courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time
of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of the first
quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the exam-
ination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to such work
during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below
the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned examina-
tion periods must be reported for adjustment. See bulletin board out-
side of Room 3209 East Engineering Building between May 29 and June
5, for instruction. To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each stu-
dent should receive notification from his instructor of the time and
place of his appearance in each course during the period June 13 to
June 19.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent of

the Classification Committee.
Time of Exercise

Time of Examnination

Monday
Tuesday

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8'
9
10
11
1
2
3

Thursday
Saturday
Friday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Monday
Thursday
Friday
Thursday
Tuesday
Monday
Saturday
Wednesday
Tuesday
*Tusay

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

13
15
14
18
19
17
13
14
13
18
17
15
19
18
13
14
15
17
17
18
19

2-4
2-4
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
8-10
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2-4
8-10
2-4
8-10
8-10
2-4
8-10
10:30-12:30
8-10
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2-4
8-10
10:30-12:30

Chem-Met 1; E.E. 2a
Draw. 1; M.E. 1; Span.;
E.M. 1; C.E. 2
Draw. 3; Surv. 1, 2, 4
Draw. 2; M.E. 3; Frenct
Econ. 53, 54; English 11
M.P. 2, 3, 4

* Thursday
German*Friday.
*Saturday
*Monday
h *Monday
* Tuesday
*Wednesday

*This may also be used as an irregular period, provided there is no
conflict with the regular printed schedule above.
Prescribed V-12 courses will also follow the above schedule.

Bureau of Appointments, 201 Mason
Hall, on Tuesday, June 4, to inter-
view men who are interested in prop-
erty insurance. Call ext. 371 for an
appointment.
State of Michigan Civil Service
Examination Announcements have
been received in this office for:
Publicist I: Salary, $200-$240.
Publicist II: Salary, $250-$290.
Publicist III: Salary, $300-$360.

tion at the Bureau or Appointments
and Occupational Information, 201
Mason Hall.
New York and Detroit department
stores will be employing college stu-
dents for the summer only. Girls
who are interested may obtain fur-
ther details at the Bureau of Ap-
pointments and Occupational Infor--
mation, 201 Mason Hall.
J. N. Adam and Company, Buffalo.

- - i

BARNABY
We watched your father's team
nractice todav. - .. Gus and1l.

Naturally not. We did our scouting through
a convenient knot-hole ... And made a most

By Crockett Johnson
Instead of ten. Or even fourteen. Which is
permitted in four old cat. But a tenth man

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