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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 30, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-05-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

, THURSDAY, MA

50 YEARS OF PROGRESS:
Automotive Industry Beguns
Celebration of Golden Jubilee

DETROIT, May 29-(')-The na-
tion's automotive industry tonight
began a 12-day celebration of itss
golden jubilee with the unveiling and3
dedication of a 60-foot transporta-1
tion tower, symbolizing the rolling
wheel, in downtown Grand Circus1
Park.I
The half-circular park and Wood-1
ward Avenue, the city's main thor-
oughfare which divides it, were rim-
med with decorative figuies as cere-7
monies commemorating 50 years ofI
progress in motorized transportation
got under way.t
Council Lifts Brownout1
The figures when lighted give thet
appearance of huge gold-tipped1
flares. Detroit's coal shortage in-9
spired "brownout" was lifted by the]
city council for four days of the1
celebration.
The jubilee committee meanwhile
announced completion of its prepara-
tions for a series of festivities, in-
cluding street jamborees, parades,
pageants, the opening of its hall
of fame and an exposition of ancient
and postwar model motor vehicles.
Four block long Washington Bou-
levard, which terminates on the west
side of Grand Circus Park was ready
for the big Saturday night carnival.
Postwar Models To Be Shown
The industry which has produced
more than 90,000,000 motor vehicles
since Charles Brady King drove the

first horseless carriage on Detroit
streets in 1896, will have its nearest
approach to an automobile show this
year in the antique car exposition.
Pageant To Be Held
Each present automobile manufac-
turer will show at least one of his
postwar models with 200 or more of
the venerable vehicles as background
at the exposition.
Scheduled to participate in the
Motor City cavalcade parade on Sat-
urday, the one and two cylindered
ancestors of the modern day motor-
car have been arriving for the last
two xieeks from various parts of the
country. Some reached here under
their own power; others were trucked
in. Some will be driven in Saturday's
parade and some will appear on
floats.
* * *
Students In jubilee
Ninety of the University's foreign
students participated last night in
the gala opening day ceremonies of
Detroit's Automotive Golden Jubi-
lee.
Dressed in their native costumes,
students from 20 Latin American re-
publics, Australia, Egypt, Iceland,
Iraq, Liberia, the Netherlands, South
Africa and Turkey draped their
country's flags on the huge monu-
ment dedicated to 50 years of auto-
motive progress.

ROBERT POTTER.... New Daily
Business Manager.

Slash Ordered
In Non-Housing
Building Plans
CPA Announces Deep
Cut in Authorizations
WASHINGTON, May 29-('-
John D. Small. Civilian Production
Administrator, tonight ordered a
deep slash in non-housing construc-
tion authorizations during the next
45 days.
Small directed each agency field
office to reduce its dollar value of
non-housing authorizations by two-
thirds in comparison with its rate
of proirct approvals for the two-
week period ending May 23.
This action is being token, Small
said because of the "impact of strikes
on production of building materials"
and because of the "large volume of
con truction already under way or
authorized."
CPA's order came a few hours af-
ter National Housing Administrator
Wilson W. Wyatt had anounced a
new housing inspection program de-
,igned to tie prices closer to the ac-
tual value of new homes built under
the v:terans emergency nousing ,jr-
gram.
Toastmaster's
Club Is Revived
Oldest Honor Society
Renewed at Banquet
Toastmaster's Club. Michigan's
oldest honor society. established in
1896 and inactive since 1942, was
revived at a spring banquet Tuesday.
The banquet, a fifty year old tra-
dition, and reorganization were di-
rected by Samuel D. Estep who was
president of the club in 1942. T. Haw-
ley Tapping, general secretary of the
Alumni Association, acted as "critic"
at the banquet.
The following people wvere elected
officers for 1946-47: Joseph N. Mor-
ency, Jr., president and Robert C.
Lesma, secretary-treasurer.
Newly initiated into the society
were: Prof. David Owen; John R.
Dykema, Ernest Getz; Robert 0.
Hancox; Edward M. Hindert; Fred-
erick C. Matthaei; James D. Me-
Nicholas; and John A. Wilson.
Bacon Will Judge
Oratorical Contest
Prof. Wallace A. Bacon of the Eng-
lish department has been invited to
judge the Horn Oratorical Contest
at Albion Saturday.
The Horn Contest, in which f in-
alists from the four college classes
compete for one of the college's old-
est prizes, is part of the Commence-
ment Week Program at Albion.

:IJEMORIA L DAY:
Student Religious Groups Plan
Banquets, Meetings, Outings

Live Baby B
To Suspend
Death' Moti

Westminister Guild members will
leave the social hall of the Presby-
terian church at 2:00 p.m. today for
a bike hike and picnic at a local
farm. In case of rain, they will hold
an informal party at the church.
Gamma Deltac Outing...
Gamma Delta, Lutheran student
club, will sponsor a Memorial Day
outing and picnic supper today.
Members will leave the Student
Center at 1:30 p.m.
Cole To Discuss
Work of Rural
Child Service
Mrs. Charley Tidd Cole, drector
of the Rural Child Service program
of the Save the Children Federa-
tion, will speak on the work of that
organization in this -country and
abroadat a meeting from 3 to 5 p.m.
tomorrow in the Rackham Building.
The talk will be given under the
auspices of the local Save the Chil-
dren Federation chapter; which is
headed by Mrs. Preston Slosson, Mrs.
Edward W. Blakeman and Mrs. F.
R. Finch, wives of University faculty
members.
Since 1942, when Mrs. Cole became
director of the Rural Child Service,
it has expanded its work so that it
nw gives financial aid to more than
800 rurual shools, in comparison to
less than 300 before that time. The
organization is now trying to raise
money to open rural schools built
in the South and Southwest by the
Works Projects Administration, but
never opened because of financial
need.
The group is also setting up facil-
ities to serve lunches in rural schools
in cooperation with the Federal Hot
Lunch Program.
Prof. Theodore Newcomb, of the
sociology department, will introduce
Mrs. Cole. The meeting will be open
without charge and no solicitations
will be sought. -
Iarnioi Will Acct
HOLLYWOOD, May 29-(P)--Tom
Harmon, former Michigan All-Ameri-
can gridder and present sports an-
nouncer in Detroit, is here to play
himself in "That Guy Joe Palooka."

SRA Annual Banquet .. .
The Student Religious Association
Installation Banquet will be held at
6:30 p.m. Saturday.
Joyce Siegan, retiring president:
Lyman Legters, president-elect, and
Homer Underwood will give a "Re-
view of the Past Years Events." Har-
vey Anderson will be the master of
ceremonies.
Reservations for the banquet may
be made at Lane Hall,
* *
Club Open House ...
Canterbury Club will hold open
house from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday at
the Student Center.
* * *
Guild Opena House .
The Roger Williams Guild will hold
open house at 8:30 p.m. Friday at the
Guild House with informal games,
music and refreshments.
Lane Hall Coffee Hour,. .
Veterans and their wives will be
guestsrof honor at the Lane all
Coffee Hour from 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Friday.
* ~* *
MCF Banquet Friday.. .
Charles Trautman, associate gen-
eral secretary of Inter-varsity will
speak at the semi-formal banquet of
the Michigan Christian Fellowship
at 6:30 p.m. Friday a1' the League.
The meal has been limited to 650
calories as a famine drive measure.

1our-Pound Dau
Alive in Oygen7

ALLENTOWN, Pa., May 29-(IP)-
A 24-year old wife of a soldier in a
condition of "suspended death" for
six months gave birth to an appar-
ently normal child, her physician re-
uorted today.
Mrs. Leland Wenger's four-pound
daughter spent its first day in an
oxygen tent at Allentown Hospital.
Attendants said the baby is in good
condition.
The mother suffered a brain in-
jury last November when she and
her husbands a corporal then sta-
tioned at Indiantown Gap, Pa., were
in an automobile collision.
Still in critical condition, she had
been fed through a stomach tube
anti until recently physicians had
been anxious about chances of the
child surviving. However, delivery was
normal after rapid labor. No anes-
thetics were used.
Dr. Gabriel A. Schwartz said Mrs.
Wenger is not in a coma but that
cily vital organs of her body in-
dependent of the brain appear to
function and maintain life.
The condition was caused by severe
multiple brain hemorrhages, he said,
which resulted in complete paraly-
sis of her limbs and facial and throat
muscles so that she cannot move,
talk, eat or even smile.
However, Dr. Schwartz observed
thac the mother apparently is semi-
conscious because her eyes move.

I

S30, 1949
orn
ted
ier
1ghter
rent

CLASSIFIED ADVEWTISING

JANET CORK . . . New Associate
Business MVanager and summer
Business Manager of The Daily.
British Report

In

LOST AND FOUNDl
LOST: State St. Tuesday afternoon.
Sheaffer pen marked "Marcia Pet-
erson". 2-2349.

LOST: Chi Omega pin between,
gell Hall and W. Med. Reward.4
Jan Main, 2-3159.

An-
Call
(12

SILVER WINGS - Bombardier.
Large size with safety clasp. Lost
between East Engine Arch and
Rackham. Great sentimental value.
Blossom Singer, 2-5184. (13
WHOEVER TOOK by mistake my
black satin raincoat from the Aller-
gy Clinic, Health Service, last Fri-
day afternoon, and left hers, please
call Doris Waisbrod, 2-2591.
LOST: - Jacket, brown suede leather,
left on South Ferry Field next to
railroad tracks last Tuesday eve-
ning. Call Alsab 6764. (6
WILL THE PERSON who piked up
my camera at Hillel Sunday please6
call Betty Leemon? 2-4471.
WANTED
WANT TO SUBLET YOUR APART-
MENT FOR THE SUMMER?,
Young couple needs apartment for
summer school only. Will take ex-
cellent care of it. Please call Mrs.
Stimson, 7621.
ROOM: Two senior veterans, for
fall and spring semesters. Univer-
sity and townspeople references.
Phone Tom McNall, 115 Winchell.
(17
VETERAN, Michigan graduate, de-
sires single room for summer ses-
sion. Would appreciate information
or contact. Write E. A. Rutan,
654 Walnut St., Elmira, N.Y. (9
SWAP: Furnished three-bedroomed
house in Seattle, Washington,
walking distance from University
for similar house within fifteen
miles of Ann Arbor. Beginning fall
term or earlier. Box 58. (11
WANTED-Ride to California after
June 15th-Will share expense. Call
West Quad, 2-4401. 10 Winchell.
(14
DRIVING to YellowstonepNational
Park June 19. Desire passengers.
Phone 2-4764. (7
MIDWAY Bicycle Shop, 322 E. Lib-
erty. We have rebuilt used bikes
for sale. Your bike can be expertly
repaired also.
HELP WANTED
FULL TIME CLERK WANTED. Over
21. Knowledge of music, typing.
Call in person. Lyon & Healy, 58
E. William. (15
WANTED: Three young men for
dishwashers at children's camp
near Ann Arbor, June 27 to Sept.
1. Salary $35 a week plus room
and board. Box 59. (10
MALE STUDENT MED., pre-med.
or G.I. with orderly 'or Ph. mate
experience to assist old gentleman
invalid for few minutes twice daily.
Telephone Mrs. Bell 8994. (2

WE HAVE openings in an executive
training program for men leaving
school this spring. We prefer men
with military background who have
had personnel or supply responsi-
bility. Training leads to positions
in retail, mail order, or administra-
tion offices. We attempt to employ
you near your home town. For pre-
liminary interviews apply in per-
son at Sears Roebuck & Co., 312
S. Main St., Ann Arbor.
POSITIONS open for counselors for
Y.M.C.A. camp, summer 1946. Ap-
ply Y.M.C.A., Ann Arbor.
HELP WANTED: Male drug clerk,
full or part time, experience pre-
ferred. Top pay. Apply Witham
Drug Company in person only.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: German Reflecta cam-
era, Spaulding top-flight tennis
racket, squash rackey'. Call 2-4616
after 7 P.M.
FOR SALE: Set of 5 matched irons
2 woods. J. H. Taylor model. Call
Des Howarth, 8417 or 2-3241. (3
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Room close to campus
for summer session, Washtenaw
Avenue fraternity house. Call Ypsi
2808W3. (1
FOR RENT: Summer session only,
3 room apartment furnished. No
children, animals. Modern. Write
box 25, Michigan Daily. (18
MISCELLANEOUS
HILDEGARDE SEWING SHOP, 116
E. Huron. Let us make your drapes,
alterations, and custom made
clothes! Phone 2-4669.
MEN'S Used Clothing Wanted. Best
prices paid. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington.
THE ROSICRUCIAN COSMO -
CONCEPTION by Max Heindel.
An authentic textbook which
reveals the harmony of religion
and science and conforms to the
intellectual development of the
modern world. Investigate this
unique book through our lend-
ing library. Phone 2-1507 (16

U. S.

Polio Virus Bombs
Newest War Terror
LONDON, May 29-()-The Daily
Express said today that a new "germ
weapon" reported developed in the
United States was infantile paral-
ysis virus so deadly that one bil-
lionth of an ounce would infect a
person.
The newspaper quoted "British
scientist- in close touch with the
U.S. Chemical Warfare Service" as
saying the virus had been developed
in powdered form by bacteriologists
at a camp in Maryland
(In Washington an Army Chemical
Warfare spokesman said the Daily
Express story "isn't true." Obviously,
the spokesman stated, if a virus had
been isolated it would oe used as the
basis for a cure. He added that a
plant in Indiana, which he declined
to identify further, was on stand-by
basis and has not produced any-
thing.)
The Daily Express said the virus
powder could be dropped over enemy
territory in air-bursting bombs or
rockets as an invisible mist and "once
inside the body it would increase and
paralyze the nervous system within
a few days."

Weapor,

STUDENTS
STAYING FOR THE SUMMER SESSION? Work be-
tween semesters! Student help is needed during the
Alumni Victory Reunion. Start after your last exam,
June 18-19, or before. Work available until June 23rd
or June 30th. Jobs for both men and women students
at good hourly pay.
PART TIME WORK also available during Summer
Session, July 1 to August 23, 1946.
Apply: Manager's office, Michigan Union, Ph. 2-4431.

M14,11GAN
Shores Today
1 :00-3:30-6:16--8:55
No short subjects will be shown
on this program.

HELD OVER!

TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Rented
Repaired
STUDENT and
OFFICE SUPPLIES
O. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

Please Note Unusual Time
Schedules for this Attraction.

I

Continuous
Daily
from 1 P.M.

STARTING TODAY!

Weekdays
30c to 5 P.M.

THESE LIVE LOVABLE ANIMALS . .
The Crow with the The Life Saving
'Taking Ways'!IDogd
T I P I E MRGREEN
The Friendly Fox! The Frog Who Pre-
dicts the Weatherl
SNOOPV -K I NG
The Gun-shy The Seeing-all Eagle!
Squirrel!
The Easy-going The Mighty
Goat! Mountain Lion!

I

I

IVIUEwUITI
-- Last Day Today
CORNERED
starring Dick Powell
and
A GENTLEMAN
MISBEHAVES
-- Friday and Saturday
YOLANDA AND THE THIEF
with Fred Astaire
-- and
WANDERER
OF THE WASTELAND

I

I.

ow .

NOW IS THE TIME
TO LEARN TO FLY
w o ..:t n f Ed .a'-n vdneation

NI5C-

U W W u .M WE5..fl m E - .e

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