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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 24, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

3 R1ID Y, Ill

Chinese Government Troops
Recapture Manchurian Capital

Communist Forces Withdraw Eastward
From Changchun, Offer Weak Resistance

Defending Communist forces with-
drew eastward after putting up only
weak and scattered resistance with-
in the city.
The Communists took Changchun
April 18 after a fiery four-day bat-
tle. This was strikingly contrasted
by today's governmentannouncement
of easy reconquest at 11 a.m., four
hours after the first government
troops entered.
No Communist report on the sit-
uation had been received here, and
there was no immediate indication
what the government success would
mean to the pacification efforts of
General Marshall, special American
-envoy in Nanking.
As if to scotch in advance any
suspicion that Changchun might
have changed hands in a "deal,"
the communique from the govern-
ment military headquarters in
Mukden said Communists seized
within the city bore orders from
their commander, Gen. Lin Piao,
to defend the capital "by all
emeans.".
The communique, issued by Gen.
- Tu Li-Ming, government commander
for the northwest, added that despite
fighting, the populace lined the
streets to cheer entry of the govern-
ment forces. The Communists simi-
I larly had claimed public support
when they took the city.

L .

IIJ FREUDE14)ND ElM.

i

Pharmacists
ToMeet Here
More than 200 Michigan pharma-
cists are expected to attend the 12th
Annual Pharmaceutical Conference
of the College of Pharmacy here
Tuesday, conference Chairman El-
mon L. Cataline announced.
The evening meeting will be a
joint session with the Michigan
Branch of the American Pharma-
ceutical Association, which will hold
its annual election of officers at that
time, prof. Cataline said.
Speakers at the conference will
include Prof. Maurice H. Seevers,
chairman of the pharmacology de-
partment, Prof. John M. Sheldon,
Carrett F. Emch, of Toledo, 0., and
Charles F. Buck, of Indianapolis, Ind.

ANN JUTZ PAUL HARSHA
. Are named as Daily editorial director and associate editors for the fall ter
Lar e Demand for Architects
Engineers Assured b Deans

i.

MARY BRUSIh

ASCAP Prize
Presented to
R. W. Nahstoll
Veteran Wins Award
For 'Copyright Law'
Richard W. Nahstoll has been
awarded first prize of $100 in the
Nathan Burkan Memorial Competi-
tion for his paper on "Copyright
Law", Dean E. Blythe Stason of the
Law School announced yesterday.
Nahstoll, a senior in Law School,
was a lieutenant in the Navy and re-
cently returned to the University
from overseas service. His home is
in East Lansing.
The Competition is sponsored by
ASCAP, the American Society of
Composers, Authors, and Publishers,
and is open to law students through-
out the nation. The prize is awarded
to the student in each school who in
the judgment of the dean, prepares
the best paper on the subject of copy-
right law.
Nathan Burkan, in whose memory
the competition was created in 1938,
was a lawyer who specialized in the
practice of copyright law.
CHAS.
HOGAN'S BAGGAGE
Phone 2-1721
TRUNKS, PARCELS
Small Move Jobs
INSURED

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

LOST: Parker 51 fountain pen. Ster-
ling top. At baseball game. Call
4145. Reward.
BROWN rectangular leather pencil
case. Contains keys, fountain pen,
etc. Lost on Observatory Street be-
tween Stockwell and U. Hospital
May 14 8 a.m. If found, inform
Yoeh-ming Ting, 1552 Stockwell.
Telephone 2-4471. Reward.
LOST: Green Schaeffer pen. Inscrib-
ed on side: service pen loaned by
Siebert and Singer, etc. Call 2-
4561, Carol Siebert. Reward.
WANTED
WANTED DESPERATELY: Two tic-
kets for Panhel. If you have one
or two, call 8942. Ask for Barb or
Lois. Reward.
MIDWAY Bicycle Shop, 322 E. Lib-
erty. We have rebuilt used bikes
for sale. Your bike can be expertly
repaired also.
M.S.C. INSTRUCTOR and family
want 2 bedroom furnished house or
apartment, June 20 to September
1. Box 55.
WANTED:, House or apartment, will
buy or rent, for veteran and wife
both doctors. Desired on or before
July 1. Call Tellman 4741. Re-
ward.

- LOS ANGELES

Olympics of 1936 - BERLIN

Olympics of 1946- LeaguC Ballroom
Don't-miss the OLYMPIC BALL

TO RENT: Dr. John C. Slaughter of
University Hospital Staff desires
modern 2 or 3 bedroom house or
apartment. Has car and can furn-
ish references. Veteran of over 4
years service. Formerly on staff
here. Mornings phone 2-2521, ext.
320. Afternoons call Health Ser-
vice 2-4531, ext. 9.
APARTMENT wanted in June by vet-
eran and wife, students, without
children or pets. Desire 2, 3, or
4 rooms for two years. Will give
part time service in apartment
building if desired. CallRobert
Schrock, 6881.
APARTMENT WANTED: For fall
and spring terms by veteran. Call
2-4591, 110 Tyler House.
HELP WANTED
HOUSEWIFE: Who needs to earn
liberal amounts full or part time
in dignified selling position. For
interview write H. T. Bair, Reming-
ton Bldg., Kalamazoo, Mich.
HELP WANTED: Male drug clerk,
full or part time, experience pre-
ferred. Top pay. Apply Witham
Drug Company in person only.
MAGAZINE PUBLISHER wants ex-
perienced secretary. Typing and
shorthand required. For interview,
call 7205.
KELP WANTED: Fountain help, top
pay, hours to your convenience,
Apply in person to Mr. Lombard or
Mr. Benden. Witham's Drug Store,
corner of S. University and Forest.
WANTED: University coed or veter,
an and wife to exchange house
work for board and room. Catho-
lic preferred but not essential. Com-
mence late June or first of July.
Address reply box 56 Michigan
Daily.
WANTED: Girl for part time work
at soda fountain. Swift's Drug
Store, 340 S. State. Phone 3534.
MISCELLANEOUS
HILDEGARDE SEWING SHOP, 116
E. Huron. Let us make your drapes,
alterations, and custom made
clothes! Phone 2-4669.
MEN'S USED CLOTHING WANTED.
Best prices paid. Sam's Store, 122
E. Washington.
CLOEHE, I wanna be where you are.
Dear Spike, I'll be at Olympic Ball,
Cloehe.
COMPLETE service on your fur coat.
Cold storage, Insurance. Cleaning,
glazing, restyling, repairing. Gin-
sberg. 607 E. Liberty.
TYPEWRITERS bought, sold, rented,
repaired. Work guaranteed. Two
days' service. Office Equipment
Co. 111 4th. St., phone 2-1213.
FOR SALE
NEW Brancroft, Lee, Dunlop, And-
reef, Hollywood frames. Nylon re-
strings - while it lasts - McClusky
and Dare, 417 8th. St.
EVENING SLIPPERS, silver. Size
7%. Worn only once. 3 inch heels,
ankle strap. $7.00. Phone 9593
after 6 p.m.

Increased Post-War
Building Boom Cited
The fact that the building boom
has been rather slo in getting under
way plus the huge backlog of activi-
ties because of the war insures a con-
tinuous "large demand for architects
for at least eight years," Dean Wells
I. Bennett of the architecture school
said yesterday.
Eight Years Training
Since eight years of education and
practical experience are needed to
become an architect in Michigan,
students who are starting school
now will have an opportunity to es-
tablish themselves, he said.
The architecture school provides
three related programs, a five year
course in architecture, four and a half
years of study for landscape archi-
tecture and a four year course in de-
sign. All these encompass different
professional activities and "provide
promising futures," Dean Bennett
stated.
Prerequisite Training
In regard to the quality of prepara-
tion for entrance intd the architec-
ture school, he listed as especial use
mathematics and some college sci-
ence, such as physics. "The student
must have aliking for building and
planning and be able to visualize
plans and then put them on paper,"
Dean Bennett declared.
Since there are two long sequences
in the school, covering architecture
design and architectural construc-
tion, which run from the freshman
through senior years, he warned stu-
dents of a loss in time in transferring
from other programs.
Rails...
(Continued from Page 1)
officials had to say, but nothing came
of it.
As the conferences broke up Whit-
ney and Johnston made public the
letter of rejection they had brought
to the President. They had not had
an opportunity to hand it to him per-
sonally, but Steelman relayed it to
him.
Less Acceptable Offer
It confirmed their previous state-
ment that the chief executive "of-
fered us 1812 cents an hour on condi-
tion that we abandon our request for
changes in rules." A fact finding
board had proposed a wage increase
of 16 cents an hour and made recom-
mendations on several rules changes.
The union heads declared the presi-
dential proposal "would leave us in
a worse position."
"The improved changes in working
conditions as provided by our request
for rules is the most important issue
in our present controversy," their let-
ter continued. "Wehave told this to
the carriers and to yourself from
the beginning."
The President had held a garden
party for disabled veterans during
the afternoon, and had gone to din-
ner at his usual time as the confer-
ences proceeded. He returned to his
office after dinner, where Steelman,
Snyder and Secretary of Labor
Schwellenbach reported to him after-
wards, but he did not meet with any
of the carrier or brotherhood repre-
sentatives.
Charles G. Ross, press secretary,
said that "the President is not going
to make any statement tonight."

Crawford Predicts
Seve -Year Need
Whereas ten or more years ago
during the depression period engin-
eers were a drag on the market,
now it is impossible to fill the de-
mand, Dean Ivan C. Crawford of
the Engineering College said yester-
day.
The supply of engineers will prob-
ably catch up to the demand again
in seven or eiglht years, he said, in-
creasing the competition with the
result that the less interested and
capable will drift into some of the
many related professions.
Administrative Opportunities
Dean Crawford estimated that 65
per cent or more of the engineers
who have been out of school 25 years
are now in administrative positions.
"It is my belief," he said, "that it is
better for a man interested in man-
agement to prepare for it through
engineering work rather than to train
specifically for an industrial man-
agement position."
There is a great deal of difference
between the- various fields of en-
gineering, he pointed out. Engineers
may be classified as mechanical, elec-
trical, civil, aeronautical and chemi-
cal and also according to their speci-
fic interests, including design, re-
search, operation and management
and sales.
Importance of Specialization
During the first year and a half,
he said, all engineering students at
the University take just about the
same courses, and follow a basic core
through part of the junior year. It
is important, however, that the en-
gineeringstudent investigate the op-
portunities in the various fields and"
definitely select a course to follow.
Dean Crawford emphasized that
no student who is not interested in
mathematics should consider engi-
neering as a vocation."
Df. Hin sdale
Des nDetroit
'U' Graduate Noted
As Educator, Author
Dr. Mary Hinsdale, 80, University
graduate, died yesterday at her home
in Detroit.
Dr. Hinsdale received her master's
and doctor's degrees in education at
the University. An author of articles
on American history and government,
she represented Michigan educators
on a commission headed by Dr. John
Dewey in 1928, which visited Russia
as guests of the Soviet department of
education.
She was a member of the Michigan
State Federation of Women's Clubs,
of the national committee of the
American Association of University
Women, and an original member of
the League of Women Voters.
Her father, Dr. Burke A. Hinsdale,
after whom Hinsdale House, East
Quad was named, was an organizer
and the first administrative head of
the University's School of Education.
. Back the
Famine Drive

ENDS

[C. TNEY

TONIGHT

I

CARL ESMOND "CAT MAN OF PARIS"
Plus - "CALLING ALL CARS"

SATURDAY THRU TUESDAY
Gen afon h orer's Famous Novel! -'

p
L
U
S

(G.(«) tG G.p f t.I tC;
She's almost ready, and she's
really beautiful! The finishing
touch will be her corsage from
the CHELSEA FLOWER
SHOP. Order it now!
P.S. For a really big impression,
get yoir gal one of the special,
locall-grown orchids!
I. ) )C~U C)G '<)t Q G~t f t) (i.- ">) r)\

The Best Assortment of
FANCY and SALTED PEANUTS
is at...
A Cila , &*ectknen
LUNCHES AND FOUNTAIN SERVICE 302 S. MAIN

Honor Societies
Names Officers
New officers of Tau Beta Pi, en-
gineering honor fraternity, are pres-
ident, James Richardson; vice-presi-
dent, Robert Aylward; recording-sec-
retary, Edward Vandenberg: corres-
ponding secretary, James Shaver.
The newly-elected member to the
Engineering Council is Richard
Broadman. Russell E. Duff will serve
as the cataloger.
The new program for next fall
which Tau Beta Pi has initiated in-
cludes plans for a free tutoring sys-
tem for returning veterans in the
engineering college.

1

9:00-12:00

$2.00

Weekdays
3Cc to 5 P.M.

...

I

I

World
News

I

"SAILOR TAKES

A WIFE"

"GOOD FUR DESERVES GOOD CARE"
on your Fur C004
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Restyling and Repairing

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