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March 05, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-03-05

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TWO

THlE MIICIGUAN DAILY

TUESDAY,

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_:.._..... __.... ...... _._..___e.._._.____._____.. __....u........__.

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Hospital Needs
Professional
Blood Donors
A great many more professional
blood donors are needed by the Uni-
versity hospital, Dr. Lloyd Burk re-
ported yesterday.
Appointments can be made begin-
ning today for all people 18 years of
age or older. Blood will be typed at
this time in order to place the stu-
dent on the active doning list, where
he will be called on no more than
once every three months, Dr. Burk
explained.
Last year more than 4,000 indi-
viduals donated their blood, he said,
and 500 of that number were pro-
fessional donors. Seventy per cent of
the contributed blood is used in surgi-
cal procedures.
Student donors thus far have been
limited to medical students and in-
ternes, he said, but a larger, perma-
nent list is necessary to cope with
emergencies.
Two Are Added.T'F cut
Two new members have been added
to the staff of the Department of Po-
litical Science, it was announced yes-
terday.
Dr. Clinton L. Rossiter, who re-
ceived his Ph.D. from Princeton, has
been appointed as an instructor. Dr.
Rossitor was in the Navy for four
years and spent a large part of that
time overseas. He was a lieutenant
~junior grade.
Arthur P. Steruerwald, a former
captain in the Army, has been ap-
pointed as a teaching fellow.

'CARETAKER GOVERNMENT':
Oust Franco, Abolish Falange,
Three Powers Ask Spaniards

SI
King Charges1
Agents Directed1
Irl- IS

SORRY FOLKS:
No New Directories 'Til Fall

...........

1.

I

BULLETIN!
By The Associated Press
MADRID, Tuesday, March 5-
The civil governor of Santander
announced today that a group of 40
armed Spanish guerrillas who
crossed the border from France
hadsbeen "liquidated" in a moun-
tain pass in Southern Santander
province after a clash with civil
guards.
The governor said the guerrillas
had been discovered after crossing
the frontier on Feb. 26 and had
been trapped in the snow-covered
pass. All in the band were killed
or captured, he declared.
The guerrillas were equipped
with hand grenades, rifles, subma-
chine guns, compasses and a field
radio, said the governor. They car-
ried concentrated food supplies and
each had about 100 pesetas (ap-
proximately $11) on his person.
Ie quoted the prisoners as say-
ing they had been working as wood-
cutters in southern France. They
maintained, the governor said, that
they had been told that a monarchy
already had been set up in Spain
and that a movement for establish-
ment of a republic was on foot.
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Mar. 4-The Unit-
ed States, Britain and France today
asked the Spanish people to oust
Generalissimo Franco by peaceful
means, abolish his Falange party, and
set up a "caretaker" government
pledged to hold free elections.
,The declaration stopped short of an
immediate diplomatic break with the
Spanish regime but said the nation
faces an international cold shoulder
until it gets rid of the dictator.
At the same time, the U. S.-which
proposed the three-power statement

on Spain - made public 15 docu-
ments captured in Europe, citing
chapter and verse of Franco's ties
with Hitler and Mussolini, and his
fervent hopes that the Axis would win
the war.
In general, the documents revealed
that Franco proposed to:
1. Seize Gibraltar, cut off the vital
Mediterranean's western mouth from
the Allies, insure the control of West-
North Africa, and ship vital war ma-
terials to Germany and Italy exclu-
sively, if
2. Hitler and Mussolini guaranteed
Franco quantities of war supplies,
armaments, planes, submarines, fuel,
food and manpower.
With these conditions met, a con-
fident Franco told the Axis leaders in
1940 that he would place Spain "in
the struggle against common enemies
(the Allies)."
The proposal, the document
showed, came to nothing when Hitler
told his chief partner, Mussolini, that
Hitler was not convinced that Spain
had the same intensity of will for giv-
ing (aid to the Axis) as for talking."
The three Allied governments
warned, in their joint declaration,
that the Spanish people cannot ex-
pect "full and cordial association"
with them so long as Franco remains.
Emphasizing there was no intention
to interfere in Spain's internal af-
fairs, the statement expressed hope
that the Spanish people would not
again have "the horrors and the bit-
terness of civil strife.

rro m lIM osco wVIf the University students want 0
see a Michiganensian this year, they
will just have to be content. with the
Espionage Inquiry fall issue of the Student Director.
Uncovers 'Network' Any hopes for a new Directory
listing the names of the many re-
OTTAWA, March 4 - Prime Min- turning veterans, new students or
ister W. L. Mackenzie King an- those with new addresses and
nounced today that Canada's es- phone numbers are in vain, accord-
pionage inquiry had produced evi- ing to Ann Wallerstein of the 'En-f
dence that Soviet and Canadian sian staff.
agents, operating under "direct in- The 'Ensian staff, which is respon-
structions from Moscow," had formed sible for the publication of both the
a "network" to obtain information University yearbook and the Direc-
on American troop movements, and tory is concentrating all its efforts
righ no ongetingthematerial for
highly confidential wartime scienti- right now ohe '46 'Ensin in shape for theprint-
fic data on the atomic bomb and ers by April 1. At present, the 'En-
radar.. sian staff is operating with a mini-
Zabotin in Charge mum number of members because of

short-handed staff and would cause
a delay perhaps as great as that of
the '45 'Ensian staff in getting
your Michiganensian to you.
So, hang on to those fall Director-
ies. They're all you're going to get.

IDiaiiornl
and
Weddi
SINCE
5ss / IRINGS
717 N. University Ave.

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Continuous
Daily
from 1 p. m.

....
.IA'iNAABDR3iIIC YTrrlvz"d

Weekdays
30c
to 5 p. m.

-TO-DAY AND WEDNESDAY-

As vrl/eltas th/ietrfirst ernv6rce...
daiasdaizyerorr s ~tl6laethst!

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i

Col. Nicolai Zabotin, military at-'
tache of the Soviet Embassy in Ot-
tawa, was declared to have been in
charge of the operations in Canada,
working with other members of the
embassy staff and with employes of
the Canadian Government and a
woman in the office of the United
Kingdom High Commissioner's Of-
ffce, which is Britain's counterpart
of an embassy here.
The British woman and three Ca-
nadian government employes had

those whom they lost in the February
graduating class.
Miss Wallerstein said that to add
to their burden by undertaking the
tedious job of putting out a Direc-
tory for the spring term would only
result in a great strain on the
Child Speech1
Aid Is Offered

WALTER WANGER presents
a FRITZ LANG production
EDWARD G. ROBINSON
JOAN BENNETTA

Fi q
i

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Don't Miss The
J-Hop Extra!

L w

IF

MICHIGAN

NOW SHOWING
JUNE WYMiAN

RAY MILLAND

In the bDraisiutic .[Fit#i

Hayes Attacks
Policy in Spain
By The Associated Press
PEORIA, Ill., March 4-Carelton
J. H. Hayes, noted historian and U. S.
ambassador to Spain from 1942 to
1945, advised tonight "I would leave
Spain to the Spaniards and patiently
trust them to bring about their own
evolution."
His remarks, at a forum meeting
sponsored by a Catholic Te Deum
group, came after a simultaneous an-
nouncement by the United States,
France and Great Britain that ex-
pressed hope for a "peaceful with-
drawal of Franco" and establishment
of an interim government.
Hayes said that when President
Roosevelt sent him to Spain in 1942
his instructions were in accordance
with "traditional American foreign
policy.,"
"But now," he said, "we seem to be
following a new line which says we
must virtually invade a country in
order to hold democratic elections."

He refused to guess at Michigan's
upcoming weather.
L ASSI FlE D

IRA Will Hold Elections
At Meeting T o iiorrow
The Inter-Racial Association will
hold its first meeting of the spring
semester at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in the
Union.
Election of a president and ratifica-
tion of the new constitution will take
place. All those interested, as well as
present members, are urged to attend.

been charged with conspiracy and
violation of Canada's Official Secret A course to aid boys and girls of
Acts, it was announced. high school age in overcoming speech
One Pleads Guilty difficulties will begin Monday at the
Speech Clinic.
They were arraigned today, and Boarding homes for each of the
only one -- Mrs. Emima Woikin, em- children planning to take the train-
ployed by the Canadian government ing course have been secured with
-pleaded guilty. The others did not -families in Ann Arbor, according to
enter a plea. They faced a maximum Dr. Harlan Bloomer, director of the
penalty of seven years imprisonment, clinic.
The Prime Minister made public To overcome their particular de-
an interim report of the two-man fects, which includes cleft palates,
royal commission conducting 'the es- voice problems and articulatory d.e-
pionage inquiry. It was the first de- fects, the children will spend six
tailed announcement of the nature hours a day at the clinic. Some of
of the espionage activity, the difficulties can be cleared up in
the first six weeks of training, Dr.
Bloomer said, but others will need
f1' e thernan. f a longer period of instruction.
A lip reading class for adults who
DETROIT, March 4 - UP) - The are hard of hearing will also be start-
weatherman hemmed and hawed here ed Monday and will run for approxi-
tonight and finally closed up like an mately eight weeks.
out-of-season clam_ - --------

DAN DURYEA
JESS BARKER
MARGARET LINDSAY
ROSALIND IVAN
SAMUEL S. HINDS
-ALSO
JOBS AHEAD
1946
WORLD NEWS
Coming Thursday!

A.

"The LOST
WEEKEND"~

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MATINEES 30c

NIGHTS 43c
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FOR RENT
ROOM FOR RENT: 725 Haven Ave-
nue. Girls' League House. Half-
block off campus. Has all con-
veniences.
ROOM AND BOARD
MEALS: For girls. Splendid home
cooked meals at League House, 604
E. Madison. Phone 4489.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Part or full time,
excellent hrs., top pay. Witham
Drug Store, corner Forest and S.
University.
WANTED
MIDWAY Bicycle Shop, 322 E. Lib-
erty. We have rebuilt used bikes
for sale. Your bike can be expertly
repaired nalso.
FOR SALE
MAN'S BLACK TUXEDO . . . size
. 30 waistline . . . perfect condition.
Call at 305 W. Hoover.
FOR SALE: 1 pr. basketball shoes,
size 7%. 836 E. University, phone
6061. Corea Hemsing.
FOR SALE: One tuxedo, one dress
suit, including shirts and shoed.
Very good condition. Phone 3909.
-LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Grey and silver Parker "51"
inscribed John H. Birkennmier.
Call Gloria H. Birkenmcier, 4121-
2147; reward.
IfOUND: Handimade silver ring, con=
structed from coin. Inscription in-
side. Owner please identify. Phone
2-1017.
LOST: Small gold Bulova nurse's
watch with initials I. B. R. on back,
Sunday between 4-6, from 1033
Packard & S. State, or between S.
State & Forest Hill. Contact 5754
after 5:00 p. m., Apt. 4.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR HIRE: A-1 dance orchestra, 5-6
pieces, as dates open, Cam"p,
references. Phone Ypsilanti 1220w.i

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