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May 22, 1946 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, IiAT 22, 1946

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Maize and Blue Net Squad Downedby Kalan

iazoo

Tb ird Doubles Decides Match
As Hornets Edge Out 5-4 Win
Wellington, Mc('lusky Play Dvspite Injuries;
Wolveriie Captai Post Ilteturns to Courts

Nine To Play

Ypsi d Tay

ELEVEN YEARS BACK:
Saturday's Track Meet W]'lh
OSU Recalls Owet's Feats

By BEV BUSSEY
Michigan's tennis team was stung
by the Hornets of Kalamazoo College,
5-4,, yesterday on the rain-washed
Ferry Field Courts in their final
home contest of the season.
With the score even at three singles
and one doubles match apiece, the
final outcome rested upon the results
of the match in which the Wolverines'
Paul Schoenlaub and Dean McClusky
faced Art Leighton and Bob Stowe
of Kalamazoo.
The Hornets took the first set, 6-3,
and were winning the second by two
games when the Maize and Blue duo
pulled up to them. Despite a steady
rain, the netters continued to play
outside, with the lead changing
hands continuously. Finally, Leight-
on and Stowe gained enough points
to take the second set, 8-6, giving
Kalamazoo the decisive match.
Because of Fred Wellington's in-
jury, Coach Leroy Weir shifted his
usual doubles combinations, teaming
Bill Mikulich with Jack Hlersh in the

Tennis Su u1ilIiicsie'

i

Singles:
Eric Pratt (K) def. Jack Hersh
(M), 6-2, 6-2
Bill Mikulicb (M) def. Nick Beres-
ky (K), 6-2, 4-6, 6-4
Art Leighton (K) def. Fred Wel-
lington (M), 6-1, 6-2
John Thompson (K) def. Dean Me-
Clusky (M), 7-5, 6-4

Jim Evans (MVI)
,(K), 7-5, 3-6,
Harold Cook (M)
(K), 6-2, 6-1
1hu1l~es:
Ilersh-Mikulich
Thompson (K)
Besesky-Staake

def. Bob Stowe
6-2
(df iojer 'Shoop

top spot. They came through for
Michigan by toppling Eric Pratt andI
John Thompson, 6-1, 6-2.
Captain Dave Post paired with Jim
Evans in the number two doubles in
his second appearance of the season,
but these two were beaten by the
prowess of Nick Beresky and Don
Staake, 6-3, 8-6.
Chalking up three points for the
Maize and Blue were singles' men
Mikulich, Evans and Harold Cook.
Mikulich went to match point five
times before winning from Beresky
in three tough sets, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3.
Seeded fifth, Evans also had to go
three sets before downing the Kala-
mazoo coach's son, Bob Stowe, 7-5,
3-6, 6-2. Facing 35-year old Homer
Shoop. who plays in a very unortho-
dox style, Hal Cook defeated his op-
ponent with ease, 6-2, 6-1, in the
number six singles.
One of the leading netmen of the
midwest is Eric Pratt, who trounced
top-seeded Jack Hersh in two ident-
ical sets, 6-2, 6-2. Playing with a tap-
ed ankle, Wellington lost, 6-1, 6-2, to
the Kalamazoo number three singles
player, Art Leighton. Dean McClusky
dropped the other singles match to
John Thompson, 7-5, 6-4.
Wolve 311Ce (;oli,
S I
Squad's CoW ii
Cliaiwes (;ood
With an away tilt against the Uni-
versity of Detroit the lone match re-
maining to. be played before the all-
important Conference tournament at
Minneapolis May 31 and June 1,
Michigan's golf team showed in its
two decisive triumphs over Purdue
and Ohio State, last Saturday and
Monday, that it has a fine chance to
regain the Big Ten golf title which
it lost to the Buckeyes last season,
after holding it for thre straight
years.
Out of twenty-one rounds played
last week-end by the top six men who
will probably make the trip to the
,omparatively easier Minnesota
course, all but two were in the 70's.
Against the Boilermakers Dave Bar-
clay carded 75-74; Pete Elliott, 77-,
75; Ed Schalon, 74-79; Rog Kessler,
77-77; Bill Ramsey, 81-78; and Bill
Courtright, 79. Playing in much bet-
ter weather Monday, but handicapped
nevertheless by faster greens, Kes-
A1er lead the field with 75-75; Bar-
clay shot 77-75; Ramsey had two
78's; Elliott a 71-81; Courtright, 75;
and Schalon 74.
If Schalon's and Courtright's single
hounds were counted in place of El-
liott's scores, Monday's low total
for four 36-hole cards would hit 602,
>ix strokes below Satuday's best and
one under the mark that won the title
for Ohio last year.
~

XaagSaXon],
Motlisoll May
Take the Mound,
Show AgaiXst Champs
After playing host to baseball's
aristocracy, the World Champion De-
troit Tigers, Michigan will get back
into its owvn social strata today, when
the Wolverines meet Ypsilanti Nor-
mal in a game that will get underwayI
3:30 p.m. at Ferry Field.
The game today will mark tie ihird
meeting of the season between Michi-I
gan and Ypsilanti. The first two, pre-
season exhibition contests, went to
the Wolverines, but in the second
game it took a ninth inning rally to'
upset the Hurons, 4-3.
Savage May Start
Coach Ray Fisher has Indic atedz
that he will use one of his pitchers
who has not seen much action this
season, probably Dick Savage, BobI
Saxon, or Pat Morrison.
In conmmenting on last Monday's
Tiger g ime. Fisher said that he was
very pleased with the defensive show-
ing of his team, but that they should
have hit better. Said Fisher. "They
hit against the Tigers just the way
they did against Minnesota. They
should (d0 better from now on."
ig i Leagues Too Good
Most of the record crowd of nearly
7,000 fans that witnessed the Tigers,
came away convinced that a hustling
college club .just didn't have enough
to stop a majior league team, not even
a bored major league team.
Except for the big sixth inning,
the Tigers never seemed to forget that
they were enjoying a day off from
the rigors of a long baseball cam-
paign. In the sixth, the champions
woke up long enzugh to punch across
six runs.
Three Double Plays
Aside from Jack Weisenberger's
triple in the first inning, which
scored Don Robinson with Michigan's
only run, Wolverine fans had only
defensive maneuvers to cheer about.
Chief among these werethree double
plays, including the most ludicrous
play of the season.
With one out and runners on first
and third, Ted Gray hit a grounder
to Bliss Bowman. Bowman threw tot
the plate and Jimmy Bloodworth wast
trapped between third and home. He
was tagged in the run down. Then ac
quick throw to Dom Tomasi caught
Bob Swift off second base. Tomasi1
and Swift then staged a foot race
to third base with Tomasi winning,i
tagging the Tiger catcher to completet
the double play.
Eat Less,
Giv I/hauYon S(ve{

f
,,_
a
' ;;
'!,
-,
aLS 4
1 \ " i

4mauiq gnew transpertutien

When Ohio State's track team in-
vades Ferry Field Saturday for a dual
meet with the Wolverine thinclads,
the thoughts of many old-timers will
return to that history-making af-
ternoon exactly 11 years ago, when
Jesse Owens became a cinder im-
mortal.
On May 25, 1935 Ohio State's sprint
star put on a one-man show that the
10,000 spectators at the Conference
meet that year will never forget. In
the preliminary heats on the first day
of competition, Owen's qualified in
four events, the low and 220-yard
dashes, the 220 low hurdles and took
only one leap to qualify in the broad
j ump.
Sets Three Records
The following day the 21-year ol:1
sophomore made track history. Fa-
vored by perfect weather conditions,
Owens set three new world's records
and tied another as he personally
accounted for 20 of the Buckeye's
431> points, which gave Ohio State

(M)
,6-1,
(K)

THE
MOTOR

second place honors to michian in
the Big Ten track met.
Although he was never pressed in
any of the four events, Owens tied
the world's record of 9.4 in the 100-
yard dash and lowered the mark for
the 220 by three-tenths of a second,
coverin the furlong in 20.3. The Ohio
State star rounded out his brilliant
perf ormance by scooting over the
220-yard low hurdles in 22.6, which
bettered the former standard by .4 of
a second, and added 6 1, 8 in. to the
broad jump rcor with a leap of 26
ft. " , in. In the1 1I years that have
elape inice Ow,'Cllii great individ-
ual peuor1ance. no one has broken
:ny ot tl e records le set that day.
OSU Succesful
Although Ohio St ate can boast of
no Jesse Owens tlis year, Coach Lar-
ry Snyder's track team is enjoying
its most succesful season since 1942
and will provide stiff competition for
the Wolverines.

def.,
6-2
def.

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Post-

Evans (M), 6-1, 6-3
Leighton-Stowe (K) def. Schoen-
laub-McClusky (M), 6-3, 8-6
Johnson Stars
As S0X Defeat
Detroit Tigers
Williams Ties Score
Witl Double in Seventh
DETROIT, May 21 - (P) - Earl
Johnson, blond southpaw relief hurl-
er, pitched and batted the Boston Red
Sox to a 6 to 4 victory here today over
the Detroit Tigers, climaxing an up-
hill battle by driving in the last two
Boston runs with an eighth inning
double.
Johnson, achieving his third victory
in relief this season, pitched five
innings of hitless ball after the Ti-
gers had profited by sloppy Red Sox
play to get away to an early 4-0 lead.
Boston Overcomes Lead
By coming from behind with a 12-
hit attack, Boston. erased the sting
of four early errors and a wild pitch
that gave Detroit all its runs, in the
first two innings.
The triumph, Boston's fifth in six
starts against the Tigers, boosted the
Red Sox' league lead to six full games
over second place New York.
Dobson Lasts One Jnning
Joe Dobson, Boston starter, lasted
just one inning, yielding two runs,
and Jim Bagby was victim of the
other two unearned tallies in the
second.
George Meckovicl homered with
nobody aboard in the third and the
Red Sox scored twice more with four
bunched singles in the fifth, driving
Virgil (Fireball) Trucks to cover.
Williams Ties Score
Johnson doubled off relief man Al
Benton in the seventh and brought
home the tying run on Ted Williams'
two-bagger.
Dom Dimaggio singled in the eighth
and stole second with a slide that put
him out of the game with a leg in-
jury. Hal Wagner was purposely
passed and Johnson lashed his second
double to right center to win the
game.
Boston 001 020 120-6
Detroit 220 000 000-4
Major Leage
Staihngs

TOM ROSEMA-Slagging Welverine first baseman, who banged out one
of the two Maize and Blue hits against the Tigers Monday, will hold
down the initial sack in the game against Ypsi Normal today.
a-I Nmaricaii To Dic-t Petosky Sports

SEE IT NOW! BUY IT TODAY Al
STOLL BICYCLE MOTOR SALES

Earl T. Mart ineau, famous Maize
and Blue backfield coach will direct
the summer recreation program for
the city of Petosky, it was announ-
ced today.
Martineau was hired by Mayor John
H. Perry, of that city. The well known
grid mentor has been training Mich-
igan backs under "Fritz" Crisler for
the past eight years, and is noted for
PR IN TING
PROGRAMS - CARDS . STIATIONERY
HANDBILLS, ETC.
Downlown: 308 Nowrit MAIN
ATHENS PRESS

his knowledge in the field of physical
education.

Martineau has a summer home at 424 South Main Street
Wallon Lake, near Petosky.
Sread THE MAN 'S MAGAZINE
FOR JUNE
beceuse - Goet your copy now at your
favorite newsstand TODAY

ERIE STANLEY GARDNER'S
The Case of the
Movie Murder

--l Ma
limm
ri%

"'4f
} 'A'
real" -a-t - r era" z

Frle Stanley Gardner, famous author of the
Perry Mason mystery stories, is a noted
criminologist. Out of the thrilling facts of
the Taylor case, one of America's hest
known, real life mysteries - out of the
vanishing clues, contrary statenents,
Hollywood reputation , se cret iden-
tities and mlising witnescss -- comes
a fantastic pizzle. Don't miss Erie
Stanley Gardner's analysis of this
amazing case - amazing, but
every word true in TRUE, the
Man's Magazine.

WHO WILL WIN THE
LOUIS,-CONN FIGHT ?

7:1 : 1-4
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HOW I WILL WIN!
t#&d exclusive y in the Jemne TRUE by
JOE LOUIS
"I'm gunnin' for an early k o.
over Billy Conn and I just
figured how to do it," says
Joe Louis in a TRUE exclusie
that you can't afford to miss.

Previewing the biggest fight in five
years, TRUE, the Man's Magazine,
gives you the views of ARTHUR
I)ONOVAN, for years one of America'a
most famous referees - AND:
HOW I WILL WIN!
old exch vely in fhh ienTRUE by
BILLY CONN
"o'oes a ime fellow. But on
June 19, William David Conn
s going to be heavyweight
thampion ofthr world." That's
Billy Conn talking hick.

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Meanwhile, until m -re dial eq ipmet

THE familiar hum of the dial tone, in e fect,
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h-m-m-tn, you'll get a wrong number or no

Pe4ect

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And DON'T forget
-A new PETTY GIRL,
Miss Curvaceous
Angler -tplus the
adventure, sports
humor and
special men's
departments
which make

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