100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 19, 1946 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-05-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, MAY 19, 46 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

AT HOME AND AWAY:

Filipino Student Flnds Many
Sinilarities in University Life
By 'ALCE CARLSON shocked until she realized that it
Many of the institutions and tra- was only in fun.
ditions which mean much to Michi- "Our term" she explained, "began
gan students are also familiar to in June and ended. in March, with a
students at the University of the beki coe ewe eetr.
Philippines, Dalisay J. Aldaba ex- break in October between semesters.
plained in cmDasinJ.AedrnativeThat is because our seasons differ
school life to that found on an Am- from yours. We also have a summer
erican campus.session lasting six weeks."
Miss Aldaba, who is studying for When asked how she learned to
her master's degree in voice iri the speak English, Miss Aldaba said that
School of Music, left the Philip- although Tagalog was their nation-
pine Woman's University when it al language, English is the official
was reduced to ruins by the Japan- language and is taught from the
ese. Her parents have lived in Mo- grades up. Spanish is spoken fluently
lolos, Bulacan Province, since the all over the islands, for their fathers
war, but until that time they had and grandfathers were educated in
resided in Manila. the Spanish system.
Pre-war life at her university, Miss The condition of the University
Aldaba related, was very much like of the Philippines is far from what
that at Michigan with a Law School it was when Miss Al daba was a
Ball and a Junior Prom. Their Stu- student there, she said. The music
dent Council was similar to the Con- school is holding classes in a stor-
gress-Cabinet here. Adding that the age room. The other schools are
Filipinos are very fond ofpolitics, practically non-existent, except
she told how the students cam- for the medical, engineering and
paigned for campus positions with nursing schools, she explained.
the enthusiastic support of the stu- "Because all their equipment has
dent body. been completely destroyed, the med-
"We also had honorary sorori- ical classes are forced to use the
ties and fraternities, whose ini- facilities of the hospital." She indi-
tiations were very entertaining." cated that one could have no ideal
Often, she related, the boys were of what the Japanese have done to
told to make love to a girl passing the school unless he were unlucky
by, and at this, the girl was quite enough to have seen it for himself.
One of the youngest of her class,
+. , Miss Aldaba graddated from the Con-
E'ngishi H1ousewiVes servatory of Music at the University
. of the Philippines where she later
Ask Re merataught voice culture. She has had
extensive experience in radio con-
LONDON, May 18-(R)-Speakers cert work as well as in instructing
before a joint conference of the Mar- at other Philippine schools of high-
ried Women's Association and the er learning. Prior to her departure
Women of Westminister declared to- she was feature soloist at weekly
day that "we loathe housework" and USO concerts presented by the Man-
asked some "monetary recognition" of ila Symphony Orchestra for the ser-
their labors in the home, vice men in the Pacific area.
- -

Towers Are
LI'md1iutarks
. T*) ll
fI '' Cmps
By MIRIAM LEVY
Designers of University buildings
have recognized the validity of the
cft-quoted maxim that college stu-
dents dwell in ivory towers.
High-minded individuals casting
glances at the numerous towe's, tur-
rets -- even belfries - surmounting
campus buildings have upheld the
fact that architects have been defin-
itely tower-minded.
The green dome rising above the
now-decadent "U" Hall was the first
of such structures. It was erected
in 1869 to make the building a more
imposing sight when viewedefroml
State Street and adjoining areas.

CARILLONNEUR RETURNS-Prof. Percival Price returned to Ann
Arbor Thursday after an extensive tour of Europe gathering tonal and
archaeological data on some 25,000 bells and aiding committees of Euro-
pean governments to retrieve bells seized during the war.

WPAG
PRESENTS
University of Michigan
VS.
ETROIT TIGERS
MONDAY, MAY 20
3:25 P.M.
PLAY-BY-PLAY

1838 Journal
Sees Joy, Ldove
In Education
"Education is peculiarly and truly
a labor of love and good will," in-
forms the 1838 edition of the Journal
of Education, now on display in the
Michigan Historical Collections ex-
hibit on "Public Schools in Michigan."
William H. Payne, prominent
Michigan educator and editor of the
Journal in 1866, wrote in the flyleaf
of his book: "Complaint has been
made that I am not working my
students hard enough."
Yes, those were the good old days
when Eliphalet, Josiah, Emmaline
and Abigail gaily tripped five miles
to the little Red Schoolhouse, a Flint
teacher's record books, of 1876, also
on display, reveals. Classes were a
family affair then, for out of 21 stu-
dents only four were not related.
An eight-year old's report card
from an Albion school, is prefaced
by this note: "Pupils who fail to pass
their year's studies will find their
promotion certificate not made out".
The certificates were very* daintily
appliqued with a flowery border.
According to the floor -plan of an
Ypsilanti schoolhouse of 1859, the
library was as big as the apparatus
and clothes rooms. One school in
1868 paid more for a shovel and pok-
er than it did for its library.
CHAS.
HOGAN'S BAGGAGE
Phone 2-1721
TRUNKS, PARCELS
Small Move Jobs
INSURED

11 1 1
Girls Guessing
If college girls think they are be-
ing mistreated by the men now, they
should consider the plight tf the
Michigan women of twenty years ago.
At that time, engineers particular-
ly believed women students were in-
truders in college life, and expressed
their feelings of superiority in an
unusual manner.
During lunch hours or warm after-
noons, engineering students reclined
on stone benches which they had
placed on either side of the diagonal
near the Engine Arch. Women stu-
dents taking walks past these bench-
es found themselves the subject of
careful scrutiny.
The male students even went to
the extent of arranging a group of
signals, the secret of which has since
been lost. This system made the pre-
dicament of the women even more
embarrassing, for they were unable
to discover whether they were being
condemned or praised.
No one can explain whether the
engineers practiced this art purely
for amusement or with the hope of
promoting a finer strain of woman-
hood. Whatever the case, this prac-
tice of rating continued for several
years, until University officials, dis-
covering the disastrous effect it had
on the morale of the women, re-
moved the benches from the walk.
Perhaps the engineers missed the
old custom and perhaps it was the
engineers, deprived of this simple
pleasure, who inaugurated the habit
of whistling at women.
Eat Less,
Give WIhdt You Save

The architects were over-enthus-
iastic, for the dome, which was all
of 347 fret, in diameter and rose
60 feet above the building, seri-
ously threatened to cave in the
auditorium beneath. As one stu-
dent phrased it, "To sit beneath it
was definitely damaging to the
body." It was torn dcwn in 1899
and replaced by its "copper-cov-
ered diminutive and bubble-like"
iron successor with a windowed
minaret.
Today there are many mighty and
minute domes to be viewed from
afar. The two bell-shaped towers
above the engineering arch, the
square-shaped clock tower of the en-
gineering laboratory and even the
five-foot tower of The Daily are ex-
amples. One could even try to as-
cend the apparently functionless,
steeple-like turret above Romance
Language Building, or he could cross
the street and climb the medieval
turrets that distinguish Newberry
Hall.
These vantage points were appar-
antly considered insufficient by the
architects, as they constiucted the
Union in 1919 complete with its own
square tower. Conforming to sacro-
sanct tradition, rules explicitly state
that the tower may be entered by
men only, save that one day a year
when women may gaze upon the
world through its sacred portals.
It remained for the Architecture
Building to have a tower as its main
motif, surrounding the stairway to
the upper floors and rising two stor-
ies above the building itself. A seat-
ed figure at the base of the tower
called "Mother Art" is a symbol of
the purpose and significance of the
structure.
The greatest recognition of the
ivory-tower tradition came with
the erection in 1936 of Burton Me-
m~orial Tower. It was erected as
a separate structure onlyrafter all
other proposed sites for the clock
and bells, such as the Union Tower
or the ton .of Angell hall, had been
rejected.
A reinforced concrete shell faced
with limestone, rising 212 feet in the
air, Burton Tower has become the
king of towers, reminding residents,
students in Arboretum 143, canoers
on the Huron, and all others of a
migratory nature that tl'y can't
forget the University as long as Bur-
ton Tower can be seen and heard.

Hey,Bossy Bossy.'
Before the Civil War, the campus IM0d
vas surroflnded by a fence, farms ad
On the w ay to classes, students h t betyn
h a d to b a ttle th e ir w a y th r o u g h s R I NGE
turnstiles to get on campus. Metal ^
posts at the ends of the diagonal
kept the cows from taking a short- 717 North University Ave.
cut.- -- --y n -.-o
AWedding Announeements
I Pand Invitations ... Personal
Cards and Stationery
] FINEST QUALITY - MODERATE PRICES
F] See Our Samples
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
1216 South University Phone 4436
F]
fSUDSI!
A CREAM
* Because T E'fLLIS i t t s I Lr it Lr4k E
leaves no dulling film on the hair.
It sudses profusely; rinses readily
with warm water only. N ~~ A
*So EASY to use-and it leaves
your hair so radiantly clean, 'frcx
grant, soft and manageable.
It's the PERFECT SHAMPOO that
assures a PERFECT HAIR-DO.
ON STATE AT THE HEAD OF NORTH UNIVERSITY

with

BOB UFE
Dial 1050

I I I

...

__
__
-- -----

-os

of

the

on

FOR THE COLLEGE STUDENT WITH AN INTEREST IN CURRENT BOOKS

T-o Secret
by
RALPH fNGERSOL
$3.00
Thi~s House
g fait lhis ouse
by
VINCENT SHEEHAN
$3.50

"Then and Nowv
by
W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM
$2.50
by
MARY JANE WARD
$2.50

I

for SUtinrep
.f>'BRUNCHC O TS
$795
Instantly you'll notice a "material"
difference in these color-bright
brunch coats made to fit right into
the act ve life you lead. They're
simple to get into-flambouyant in
color- beautifully finished- figure
flattering and you won't have to
pamper it in the hottest weather.
>y Sizes in your favorite sleeve length.
Sizes 10 to 16.
/0' 1 / *\ T T TA T ("

it
II

11 1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan